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Full text of "Memoirs of Wayne County and the city of Richmond, Indiana; from the earliest historical times down to the present, including a genealogical and biographical record of representative families in Wayne County"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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3 1833 02300 5306 



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RFYNOLDS HfSTORlCttL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/memoirsofwaynecoOOfoxh 



MEMOIRS 



□ F 



W A Y N E C U N T Y 



ANtl THE 



City of Richmond 



t n n t a n a 



FROM THE EARLIEST HISTORICAL TIMES DOWN TC 

'HE PRESENT, INCLUDING A GENEALO' ." :AL 

AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OI 

REPRESENTATIVE FAMILIES 

IN WAYNE COUNTY 



HON. HENRY CLAY FOX, Editor-in- chief 



LLUSTRATED 






VOLUME II. 



MAUISON. WISCONSIN 
WESTERN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUILIC LIBRARY 

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



BIOGRAPHICAI 



7031^7? 443 



Enos Warfel, a veteran school teacher and farmer of the town- 
ship of Jefferson, and a prominent citizen, was born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 22, 1853. 11 is parents were Amos and 
Catherine (Brown) Warfel, natives of Pennsylvania. It is prob- 
able that the name, Warfel, was originally "Warfield." There were 
three brothers who came from Germany before the Revolutionary 
war, and two of them settled in Pennsylvania and one in Maryland, 
and they became the founders of the family in America. The 
paternal grandfather was Jacob Warfel, who married a Miss Lontz, 
and they became the parents of eleven children — George, Christ, 
Jacob, Peter, Paul, Susan, Leah, Fannie, l'.elsy, Mary and Amos. 
The maternal grandparents were Jacob I'.rown and wile, the 
maiden name of the latter having been McCurdy. They were of 
Scotch-Irish nationality and became the parents of six daughters, 
five of whom married and came to Indiana, and one of whom died 
in Pennsylvania. There were also three sons who remained in 
Pennsylvania. Amos Warfel came to Wayne county in 1865, 
bringing with him his family of seven children, three having died 
in infancy. Of the seven who grew to maturity, Amanda married 
Washington Leek, of Germantown, Ind., and thev had five chil- 
dren—Laura. Ellsworth, Frank, Alva, and Willard"; Aldus, who is 
a farmer at Germantown, married Lmma Lorn* and thev have two 
children— Flora and Lillie •: Harry C., who reside- in ' Richmond, 
married Lucinda Worl and the)' have two children — Frank W. and 
Fred; Lnos is the next in order of birth ; Millard F., who resides at 
Richmond, married Ada Tout and they have seven children — 
Harry, Ethel, Edward, Xella, Ersie, Donald, and one that died in 
infancy; Elmer, who is in the United States mail service at Con- 
nersville, married Clara lamison ami thev have three children- 
Grace, Charles, and Raul; and Ella is the wife of William I'.ehr, of 
Germantown, and they have four children — Carl, |oseph, Russell, 
and llobart. Enos Warfel was twelve years old when he came to 
Wayne county with his father, and he received his education in the 
public schools of Germantown, Cambridge City and Lublin. II is 
father was engaged in the United Stales mail service for a period 
of twenty-live years, carrying the mail from Cambridge City to 
Mlincie until the advent of the railroad and then from Cambridge 
City to Jacksonburg. The son began to do for himself at the age of 
fourteen years, as his father believed that a boy should begin early 
to earn his own way in the world. He worked at various things, 
principally on farms, and attended school during the winter terms 
until qualified to teach, which occupation he followed for twenty 
years, farming during the summer months. He farmed in Harri- 
son township two years ami then purchased the tract of 110 acres 
which he now occupies in Jefferson township. To-day he has as 
fine a country home as there is in the county ; the house is entirely 
modern in appearance as well as in the conveniences therein, and 
spacious and comfortable out buildings and barns adorn the place. 
He devotes his attention to general farming and stock raising, mak- 
ing a specialty of hogs. On Sept. 5, 1878, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Mollie Jarboe. She is a daughter of Henry J. and Eva- 



444 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

line (Flook) Jarboe. The mother was born in the State of Mary- 
land, Oct. 30, 1820, and died in Wayne county, Feb. 19, 1880. The 
father, also a native of Maryland, born Oct. 30, 1817, came to 
Wayne county in 1845 and resided here the residue of his life. Mrs. 
Warfel was born in Wayne county, Nov. 14, 1858, and received her 
educational training in the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Warfel 
were blessed by the birth of two children: Alonzo, burn July 25, 
1879, died Aug. 19, 1901 ; and Ray J., burn Sept. 2, 1881, is farming 
in Jefferson township. Ray J. married Mary Taylor, daughter of 
Jacob and Sadie (Hindman) Taylor, the former a resident of 
Ilagerstown and the latter is deceased. Two daughters — Sara 
Irene and Ruth Josephene — have been born to Kay J. and wife. 
Mr. Warfel is a Republican in politics. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian Church. 

Theodore Alexander Shafer, a prominent farmer of Jefferson 
township, was born in Miami county, Indiana, March 30, 1855. 
His father, John Shafer, was a native of Wayne county, and his 
mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Shafer, was born in 
Pennsylvania. John Shafer was a son of Adam Shafer, who in turn 
was a son of Nicholas Shafer, who removed from York county, 
Pennsylvania, to Center county, in the same State, and whose de- 
scendants later came to Indiana. The Shafer family is descended 
from the "30,000 Dutch" who came to America from Germany in 
the earl}' Colonial period. Nicholas Shafer and his brother John 
were captains in the Revolutionary war. Adam Shafer came to 
Wayne county, Indiana, in 1830. He had married Rebecca Rouch 
in Pennsylvania, where she was born and reared to womanhood, 
and settled about four miles north of Cambridge City, on a farm 
which still remains in the possession of the Shafer family. ( >f 
this union were born nine children: Fannie married Amos Kauff- 
man, a farmer of Jefferson township, and the}- had eight children — 
Rebecca, Silas, Mary, Martha, Louisa, Anna, Willard, and Ida; 
Michael, who became a farmer in Jefferson township, married 
Mar}- Smook and the}' had seven children — Elvina, Elizabeth, 
Adam and Catherine (twins), Levi and Eli (twins), and Mary; 
John was the father of Theodore A.; Elizabeth, who died in early 
womanhood, was the wife of Isaac Cromley ; Adam, who became a 
farmer in Henry count}-, married Rachel Gephart and they had 
eleven children — Ellen, Rebecca, Susan, John, Lydia, Emma, Ma- 
linda, Edna, Ary Francis, Charles, and Dora; Isaac died at the age 
of eighteen years; Mary Ann married Peter Lutz, of Delaware 
county, and they had live children — Mary R., Flora, Henry, Hector, 
and Emma; William died at the age of twenty-six years; and 
Henry, who is a retired farmer in Jefferson township, served three 
years as a soldier in the Civil war. After the death of his first 
wife Adam Shafer married Mary (Rouch) Miller, a sister of his 
first wife, and of this union were born five children: Andrew, de- 
ceased, married Ruhammah Whcalen and they had three children — 
Minnie, Mary, and Delia ; Daniel, who is a farmer in Wayne 
county, married Virginia Ware and they had four children 
Sarah, Samuel, Odis, and Ola; George died young; Nicholas resides- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 445 

in Hagerstown; and Samuel died young. John Shafer was born in 
Wayne county in 183 1, on the old Adam Shafer farm, where he 
grew to manhood. He became a prominent man in his neighbor- 
hood, being an arbitrator in disputes, settling estates, etc. lie was 
a Jeffersonian Democrat and his religious faith was expressed by 
membership in the United Brethren church. In 1908 he received 
his summons to another world, and his wife passed away in iQio. 
To this thrifty, hardy couple were born ten children — six sons and 
four daughters: Margaret A. is the wife of Daniel Smith, of Rich- 
mond, and they have eight children — Clarissa, Albert, William, 
Henry, Esther, John, Hugh, and Ruth; Theodore A. is the second 
in order of birth: Sxlvester, a real estate dealer in Muncie, married 
Maggie Houser, and they have one child, Edith; Sarah is the wife 
of Isaiah Howard, of Muncie, and they have two children — Walter 
and Alary; Henry resides on the John Shafer homestead, in Jeffer- 
son township, is married to Fannie Nichols and they have two 
children — Ralph and Harry; Amanda is the widow of Edward I n- 
derhill and the mother of two children — Ruby and Gertrude; John, 
who is a surveyor in Indianapolis, married Alva Beck, and they 
have one child, Helen; Ozro B. resides in Seattle, Wash.; Elmetta 
is the wife of William Keppler, of Indianapolis, and they have three 
children — Arthur, Frank, and Mary; and William died in child- 
hood. Theodore A. Shafer started his independent career at the 
age of twenty years by teaching school, which occupation he fol- 
lowed thirteen years, lie then began farming near Hagerstown, 
in 1885, and resided there until 1902, when he removed to his pres- 
ent farm of 128 acres, situated on the pike, two miles northeast of 
Hagerstown, where he follows general farming and stock raising. 
He is a breeder of a fine strain of Barred Rock chickens and has a 
number of fine specimens in his (lock. Air. Shafer has been twice 
married — first to Anna Replogle, which union was dissolved by 
divorce. On Oct. 7, 1908, he was married in the township of Jef- 
ferson to Mrs. Emma Rinehart, widow of Charles Rinehart and a 
daughter of John and Nancy Harris, of Henry county. By her 
former marriage Mrs. Shafer has four children — Frank, Harry, 
Lawrence, and Ada, the last named of whom resides al the Shafer 
home. Mr. Shafer is a staunch Democrat in his political views and 
the religious faith of himself and wife is expressed by membership 
in the United Brethren church. He is a popular man in his com- 
munity and is the adjuster for the German Baptist Tri-County 
Mutual Protective Association, of Hagerstown. 

Moses Keever, one of the prominent agriculturists of Jeffer- 
son township, was born in Wayne county, Indiana, Jan. 25, 1870. 
His father, Jackson Keever, was born in Wayne county, and the 
grandfather, Joseph Keever, was the father of ten children: Ma- 
linda married John Brooks, Seneca married Phoebe Waltz, Moses 
was the third and Jackson was the fourth in order of birth, Joseph 
died in 1844, William married Anna Bales, Margaret married Alah- 
lon Beeson, Miles married Margaret Lamb and after her death 
Ellen Martin, Abram married Mary Jackson, and Mary J. married 
Warren Lowrey. The father, Jackson Keever, followed agricul- 



44^> MEM OIKS OF W'AYNK COUNTY 

tural pursuits all his active career, lie was domestic in his tastes 
and lumest and honorable in all the relations of life, lie was a 
prominent Democrat and his religious faith was expressed by mem- 
bership in the United Brethren church, lie married Miss Mary 
E. Fleming, daughter of David ami Lucy (McMurray) Fleming, of 
Wayne county, and of this union were horn seven children: Mar- 
cus, who is a mechanic in New Castle, married Martha Mahoney; 
Ella is the widow of Jefferson Leavell and has a daughter, Daisy, 
who is a graduate of the Hagerstown High School and has for 
many years devoted her time and attention to leaching; Katy died 
in childhood; Granville, a mechanic at Muncie, lnd., married Min- 
nie Abbott and the)' have a daughter, Eva; William died in child 
hood; Moses is the next in order of birth; and Elizabeth is the 
wife of Harrison V. Brown, of Muncie, lnd., and they have a son, 
Robert. She graduated in the Hagerstown High School in 1893 
and devoted several years to teaching, in the meantime graduating 
in the State Normal School. David Fleming came from Pennsyl- 
vania to Indiana in 1830. He was a miller by trade and operated a 
mill on West river for many years. He was twice married and 
became the father of six children, the eldest being Mary E., born 
Feb. 27, 1837, who became the mother of Moses Keever; Laura 
married John Doughty, a farmer of Wayne county, and they had 
five children — Charley, Anna, Josephine, Frank, and Sallie ; Harriet 
married John Baldwin and they had three children — Ozro, Lewis, 
and May; Lucy, deceased, became the wife of John M. L. Menden- 
hall (see sketch) ; Francis is deceased; and David W. married Clara 
Hockett. Moses Keever graduated at the Hagerstown High School 
in 1893, with class honors, which entitled him to a scholarship in 
DePauw and the Crawfordsville universities, but he did not take 
advantage of either, turning his attention to farming, lie worked 
on his father's farm until twenty-five years old, when he removed 
to the farm of 156 acres where he resides. The farm is given over 
to general agriculture, with a specialty of the dairy business, and 
Mr. Keever keeps on an average a herd of twenty cattle. He de- 
votes a great deal of attention to the breeding of Jersey stock, and 
his farm is well located and under a high state of cultivation. In 
the matter of politics Mr. Keever is a- stanch adherent of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party, but has never sought public office 
of any nature. On Nov. 24, 1894, he was married to Tina Replogle, 
daughter of Joel and Orilla (McLucas) Replogle, of Wayne county, 
where both parents were born. Joseph Replogle, the father of 
Joel, came from Pennsylvania to Indiana in 1832, with his wife, 
whose maiden name was Christine Fpperley, and they were both 
Pennsylvania Germans, whose parents came from the Fatherland. 
To Joel Replogle and wife were born two children — Mrs. Keexer,. 
born March 21, 1866, and John M., who is a farmer in Jefferson 
township, married Rebecca Pipher and they have a child, Golden. 
To Moses Keever and wife have been born two children — Chester 
E., born March 22, 1896, and Francis M., born May 27, 1898. Mrs. 
Keever is a graduate of the Hagerstown High School ami devoted 
several years of her early life to teaching. 



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BIOGRAI'IIICAI. 447 

Nelson Baldridge Thornburgh, who has been ewgaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits all of his life, is a native of Wayne county and 
was born in Jefferson township, Sept. 27, 1848. II is father and 
mother — John II. and Harriet (Parsons) Thornburgh — were na- 
tives of Wayne county, the father having been born in Jefferson 
township, Nov. 5, 1824, and the mother, July 6, 1827. The father 
has passed away, his death occurring Aug. 27, 1887, and the mother 
resides in Hagerstown. The paternal grandfather was Jesse 
Thornburgh, and in his family were eight children: Cornelius II, 
married Mary Conoway and they had four children — John \\ ., Mar- 
garet, Wayne, and Thomas; John II. was the second in order of 
birth; Jesse married Kmeline Wright and they had five children — 
Charles, Josephine, Orville, Ulysses, and George; Sarah married 
Richard Cheesman, a farmer of Dalton township, 
five children — Rebecca, Josephine, Harry, Edward 
Mary married George Hindinan, of Hagerstown, 
seven children — Mattie, Frank, Laura, William, Clara 
James married Libbie Bower and they hail six ch 
Florence, Fay, Leone, and two others; William mar 
Slifrer and they had a son, Oliver; and Margaret 
Mathers, of Hagerstown, and they had two children 
ceased, and Gertie. John 11. Thornburgh was reared in Jefferson 
township, where he established a home and resided all of his life. 
He was a good citizen, and as a husband and father was unexcelled. 
He served in the State legislature and was justice of the peace in 
Jefferson township a number of years. On June 1, 1845, he was 
married to Harriet Parsons, daughter of Benjamin and Martha 
(Garrison) Parsons. Mr. Parsons was bom near Philadelphia, Pa., 
and his father came from Scotland when a young man, married in 
Pennsylvania and had two children — Benjamin and Phoebe. Har- 
riet (Parsons) Thornburgh was the youngest of twelve children. 
To her and her husband were born seven children: William, who 
resides in Muncie, Ind., married Maggie Conway and they have 
four children — Otto, Walter, Blanche, and Ira; Nelson 11. is the 
second in order of birth; Martha is the wife of John A. Locke, of 
Hagerstown, and they have two children — Emma and Edgar; 
Alice resides with her mother in Hagerstown; Ilattie, deceased, 
was the wife of Bennett P. Weaver, of Hagerstown, and they had 
three children — Frank, Raymond, and Bula ; Noble, who is a car- 
penter at Muncie, Inch, married Clara Lamb and they have two 
children — Maude and Harry; and May, deceased, was the wife of 
Roe Sherry, a farmer of Jefferson township, and they had two chil- 
dren — George and Lulu. Nelson 15. Thornburgh received his early 
education in the district schools of his native township, and after 
his school days were completed, at the age of twenty years, began 
life as a farmer on the old homestead, where he has continued to 
reside up to the present time. He is located about two and one- 
half miles from the village of Hagerstown, where he follows a line 
of general farming. In March, 1870, he was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth Dolley, daughter of John A. Dolley, of the village of 
Hagerstown, and of this union there is a son, George, born March 



448 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

13, 1872, who is engaged in the tea and spice business in Indian- 
apolis, and is married to Gertrude Stevenson. The first wife hav- 
ing died, Mr. Thornburgh was married to Mary Elizabeth Wilson, 
daughter of Willis and Lettice (Thompson) Wilson, of Conners- 
ville, Ind., both deceased. Mrs. Thornburgh was born at Conners- 
ville, Aug. 19, 1852. To her and her husband have been born three 
children — Charles Rudy, born April 10, 1876; Rush Porter, born 
June 28, 1882; and lone Beatrice, born Feb. 10, 1885. Charles is 
engaged with the Light Inspection Car Company at Hagerstown. 
He married Geneva Martin, of Indianapolis, and of this union there 
is a daughter, La Verne Esther, born Sept. 15, 1903, who is being 
reared by her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Thornburgh. Rush P. 
is engaged with the Maxwell Automobile Company, of New Castle, 
and he married Florence Keyes, of Hagerstown. lone B. resides 
at the parental home. Nelson B. Thornburgh is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias lodge at Hagerstown, and also of the Uniform 
Rank of the same order. His two sons — Charles R. and lone B. - 
are also members of the Knights of Pythias. Charles R. served as 
a soldier in the Spanish-American war with an Indianapolis com- 
pany. Willis Wilson, father of Mrs. Thornburgh, was a native of 
Kentucky, bom in 1811, and died in March, 1885. He was for 
many years a shoe merchant at Connersville, I ml., where his death 
occurred. His wife, Lettice (Thompson) Wilson, died at the age 
of forty-two years, when Mrs. Thornburgh was but five years old. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson there were born six sons and two daugh- 
ters: Malpheus Mason, who is living retired at Connersville, 
served as a soldier throughout the entire period of the Civil war; 
Martin Jerome, deceased, also served as a soldier in the Civil wai ; 
Arabella is the wife of William Brothers, of Cincinnati, Ohio; 
John Taylor, who also served as a soldier in the Civil war, was 
last heard from in the Western States; Rush Brooks resides in Des 
Moines, Iowa; Mrs. Thornburgh is the next in order of birth; and 
Thomas L. and George A. reside in Connersville. 

Robert Anderson Howard, deceased, a striking example of that 
class of Old Virginia gentlemen who have proved to be citizens of 
such sterling worth to the Slate and county of their adoption, w..s 
born in Wythe county, Virginia, Aug. 13, 1829. lie was a son of 
Anderson Howard, a native of the Old Dominion, where he lived 
out his allotted time and is buried, as are the ancestors for three 
generations. The Howards came from England in 1770, and Wil- 
liam Howard, great-grandfather of Robert A. and Ezekiel, the 
grandfather, were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Robert A. 
Howard acquired his education in his native State and spent his 
early life in the locality of his birth. In 1855 he moved to Rich- 
mond, Ind., where he became one of the foremost civil engineers 
in the city at that time and was elected county surveyor in 1806, 
continuing in that office until 1871. In thai year he was named 
city engineer of Richmond, in which capacity he remained until 
1875. He then removed with his family to McArthur, Ohio, to 
accept a position as engineer for the Ohio & Hocking Valley rail- 
road, maintaining headquarters at Gallipolis, Ohio. He returned 







ROBERT ANDERSON HOWARD. 



biographical 449 

to Richmond in 1885 and a year later was again elected county 
surveyor, continuing in that office until his death. That sad event 
occurred July 21, 1910, and terminated a long, successful, and use- 
ful career. In 1854 was celehrated his marriage to Miss Eliza 
Wheeler, a true helpmate, a native of Virginia, and of their union 
were horn two daughters — Lillian A., of Santa Cruz, Cah, and 
Mrs. Belle 11. Horlon, who is a widow and resides with her mother 
in the old home in Richmond. Miss Lillian A. Howard is a teacher 
in drawing in the high school at Santa Cruz., Cal. Mrs. llorton is 
a member of the Richmond chapter of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution and also of the Order of the Eastern Star, of 
which local organization she is secretary. Four grandchildren and 
one great-grandchild also survive Mr. Howard, one of the former, 
Howard Horton, being named by the county commissioners to fill 
out the unexpired term of his grandfather as county surveyor. He 
had been in the office with his grandfather as assistant several 
years, being thus thoroughly acquainted with the work, and made 
an efficient official. Mr. Howard had been an Odd Fellow for 
more than sixty years, having joined the organization when a 
young man in Virginia. He was a very prominent member of the 
Indiana Engineering Society, although he never held an office in 
the organization, but read many papers before the various meet- 
ings. His work in Wayne county is manifested by the splendid 
roads, and a large number of the streets in Richmond were per- 
fected during the time he was city engineer; and practically all 
of the bridges and other improvements in the public highways in 
the county are his work. He also supervised many of the im- 
provements in Glen Miller Lark. He was a man of friendly nature 
and congenial spirit and had a host of friends, among whom he- 
was highly esteemed. He was one of the most popular men in 
Wayne count}'. He was a truly public-spirited citizen, who re- 
served for himself the right of independent views as to the men 
and principles for which he voted. His remains were taken to 
Cincinnati, where they were cremated, and the ashes were then 
interred in Elkhorn Cemetery. 

John R. Thornburgh, who is descended from sturdy American 
stock and is a prominent and prosperous farmer of Jefferson town- 
ship, was born in Dalton township, Jan. 25, £864. His parents 
were Thomas E. and Mary A. (Fonts) Thornburgh, natives of Dal- 
ton township. His father, who was born in 1837, died in 1889, be- 
ing survived by his wife, who was born Aug. 31, 1840. The pater- 
nal grandfather was Dempsey Thornburgh, who came to Indiana 
in 1819, with his father, Walter Thornburgh, and Dempsey at that 
time was eighteen years old. They came from Knoxville, Tenn., 
ami were accompanied by Henry Thornburgh — a brother of Wal- 
ter — and a sister. Walter Thornburgh settled in Ferry township, 
two miles west of Economy, and there followed farming. Demp- 
sey Thornburgh married and became the father of twelve children: 
John died in infancy; Irena married Lindsey Dennis, of Dalton 
township, and they had six children — Martha J., Melinda, Demp- 
sey, Emma, Mary A., and Oliver; Rachel married Wilson Dennis, 



450 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

of Dalton township, and they had three children — Elizabeth, Lydia, 
and Thomas; Waller removed to Santiago, Cal., married and had 
two children — Walter and Jennie; Seth married Mahala Bookout 
and they had nine children — Thomas, John II., Oliver, Frank, Alice, 
Esther. Charles, Roscoe and Dexter; Zarilda first married Ezra 
Lee, of Dalton township, by whom she had two children — Jane 
and Ellen — and after his death married Joseph Routh and they had 
four children— Etha A., Cynthia, Irene, and Etta E. ; William R. 
married Betsy M. Spradlin and they had four children — Rachel, 
Emma, Walter, and Ella; Thomas E. was the sixth in order of 
birth; James Riley died in infancy; Dempsey C. married Ethlinda 
Williams and they had three children — George L., Frank V., and 
Harry C. ; Sarah E. is the wife of Thomas C. Dennis, of Richmond, 
and they had eleven children — Albert, Henry, David, Dempsey, 
Alice, Margaret, Eunice, Etha, Grace, Clara, and Nellie; and Alary 
Jane, who is deceased, married Lewis Spradlin, of Dalton town- 
ship, and they had six children — Levada, Lillie, Rene, Elwood, 
Dempsey, and Allie. Thomas E. Thornburgh was reared on the 
home farm and lived the greater part of his life in Dalton town- 
ship. He was a carpenter by trade, but spent the greater part of 
his time cm the farm, lie was considered a good man in his neigh- 
borhood and to make his acquaintance was synonymous to making 
a new friend. When he died he had the respect of the entire com- 
munity and his loss was greatly felt by all who had the privilege 
of his companionship. On March 15, 1858, he was married to Mary 
A. Fonts, daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Stabler) Fonts, and of this 
union were born two children — John R., and Clara M., born Aug. 
21, 1875. John R. Thornburgh was educated in the district schools 
of Dalton township. After his school days were completed, at the 
age of seventeen years, he began his independent career by work- 
ing on a farm six years. He then engaged in the barber business 
at Hagerstown twenty years and in that business accumulated 
enough to acquire, with his mother, the farm of 1 _>o acres where he 
resides and which he purchased in 1908. The farm is located on 
the West River Pike, two miles north of Hagerstown, and he fol- 
lows general farming and stock raising, his specialties being Jer- 
sey cattle and Roland China hogs. The farm is well improved ami 
has been made productive by skillful husbandry, lie L a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 25, at Ha- 
gerstown, and of the Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 198, at the 
same place. Of the latter organization he has served as Chancellor 
Commander and for two years was Deputy Grand Chancellor of 
the Sixth Indiana district. Mr. Thornburgh is a Republican, but is 
not active in politics, preferring the quiet enjoyment of his home 
and family to the strifes and dissensions that politics and office 
seeking Avill bring. He has never married, and his mother and 
sister are the other members of his family circle. His home is 
noted, for its hospitality and visitors come away with the impres- 
sion of meeting a family whose greatest interest is to be useful to 
each other and make the home a paradise on earth. He is a mem- 
ber of the Friends' Church. Mary A. Fonts, mother of Mr. Thorn- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 45 1 

burgh, is a daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Stabler) Fonts, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Philadelphia, Pa They were 
married in Ohio and later came to Wayne county, settling on what 
is now the farm of John M. Mendenhall, in Jefferson township. 
They relocated later on the present Oscar Brown farm and both 
died there. The father was always a farmer and both he and his 
wife were members of the Church of the Brethren. I le died at the 
age of eighty-one years, July 15, 1893, ;m( l sne died Feb. 27, 1897, 
aged ninety-three years. To them were born two children — Mary 
A., and Margaret, widow of Samuel Brown. Mr. bouts' people 
were from North Carolina. 

Adam Rowe, of Jefferson township, is descended from one of 
the German families whose dauntless spirits conquered the wilder- 
ness and whose fortitude and steadfast principles for right have 
done so much to build up not only this community but the country 
in general, lie was born in Frederick count}-, Maryland, March 14, 
1851, son of John aid Caroline Rowe, born in Germany, where they 
were married, and in 1843, with two children, migrated to America, 
landing in the city of Baltimore. The name Rowe has been di- 
verted from Rough, the German form of spelling, fohn Row e re- 
mained in Maryland until 1861, and then, feeling the call of the 
newer country in the West, with his family came to Indiana, set- 
tling in Jefferson township, this count}-, where he purchased land 
and lived until his death, April 15, 1890. Although active in poli- 
tics and other public duties, he never held office of great impor- 
tance, but considered his duty and honest political convictions 
paramount to any issues in either civil or political life. He and 
his first wife were members of the Church of the Brethren. Of 
their marriage were born eight children: Magdaline married 
Dav-d Replogle, of Wayne county; Thomas married Lizzie Ben- 
nett ; Caroline married David Werking, of Henry county ; Susan R. 
married David Rhodes, of Henry county; John married Catherine 
Hoover, of Jefferson township; Adam is the sixth in order of birth; 
Christina married Martin Werking, of Wayne count}- ; and one 
child died in infancy. After the death of his first wife John Rowe 
was married to Lydia L. Brown, daughter of Samuel Brown, who 
came to Hagerstown from Maryland about 1850, and many years 
was a justice of the peace, being known as " 'Squire Brown." Of 
this union were born eleven children: Anna M. is the wife of 
Oliver Brown, of Hagerstown; Catherine is the wife of John 
Teeter, of Hagerstown; Emma is the wife of Lloyd Williams, of 
Indianapolis; Charles married Ida Gephardt and resides in Mun- 
cie; Rebecca is the wife of Lewis Waltz, of Anderson; Etta is the 
wife of William Dawley, of California; William resides in Bloom- 
ingdale, Ohio; Agnes is the wife of William Jessup. of Anderson; 
Oliver married Amanda Deresdorf and resides in Hagerstown ; Liz- 
zie is the wife of Wayne Nicholson, of Anderson, Ind ; and Mvrtle 
is the wife of Arthur Champlin. Adam Rowe's earl} education was 
obtained in the schools of Maryland and in the schools of the town- 
ship of his adoption in Wayne count}-. He assisted his father on' 
the farm until twenty-one years old and then began his independ- 



452 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ent career, working as a farmhand by the month twenty years. lie 
then rented land five years, at the end of which period he pur- 
chased the farm of 140 acres where he resides, and where lie has 
made many modern improvements. Jn politics he is a stanch 
Democrat. In 1882, in Jefferson township, he was married to 
Georgie Ella Brown, daughter of David and Maria (Knode) Brown, 
natives of Maryland, the former horn in Washington count}', Nov. 
II, 1814, and the latter on May II, 1815. The father died Nov. 13, 
1890, and the mother in 1809. They were married Jan. 15, 1837, 
and were members of the Church of the Brethren. One child was 
born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Rowe, but it died in infancy. 
The farm where Mr. and Mrs. Rowe reside is the old Brown home- 
stead. Mrs. Rowe is one of ten children born to her parents: 
Hamilton W. died in childhood; Richard II., Samuel II.. Archibald 
K., and Molly are deceased ; Thomas T. married Adelia Hawser and 
resides in Clinton, Mo.; Anna Amelia is the widow of William 
Burns and resides in llagerstown; Oliver 1). is deceased; Mrs. 
Rowe was born Sept. 27, 1853; and one child died in infancy. David 
Brown moved to Wayne count \ in 1850 and settled on a farm in 
Jefferson township, one-half mile north of Hagerstown. In 1858 
he moved to a farm one and one-half miles north of Hagerstown, 
where Adam Rowe resides, and there spent the balance of his hie. 
John Carver Keever, one of the representative tanners in the 
township of Dalton, where he is extensively engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits, is a native son of Wayne count)- and a scion of one 
of the old and honored families of this section of the State. He 
was born in Dalton township, this county, Aug. 6, 1854, a son of 
Moses and Sarah ( Bales) Keever, the father Don in ( )hio, in 1828, 
and the mother in Dalton township, where her forebears located in 
the early pioneer period. Joseph Keever, paternal grandfather of 
the subject of this review, was a native of Ohio and a sun of Henry 
Keever, who came fn in Germany to Pennsylvania, later removed 
to Kentucky and thence to Ohio, where Joseph was born. Joseph 
Keever married and became the father of ten children: Seneca 
married Phoebe Waltz ami the) had eight children — William, Jo- 
seph, Pauline, Helen, Charlotte, Peter, Lorin, and Theodore; Ma- 
linda became the wife of John Brooks and they had seven chil- 
dren — Nelson, Louzina, Lorinda, Emma, Delilah, and Mary and 
Sarah, twins; Moses was the third in order of birth; Joseph died 
in 1844; Margaret became the wife of Mahlon Reeson and they had 
three children— Wilbert, Ella, and Laura; Jackson married Mary 
Fleming and they had five children — Marcus, Ella, Katie, Gran- 
ville, and Moses; Mary J. marred Warren Lowrey and they had 
a son, Nelson; William married Mrs. Anna (Bales) Beeson; Miles 
married Margaret Eeavell, who bore him two children — Levi and 
Franklin— and after the death "i his first wife he married Ellen 
Martin, who bore him six children — Aide, llearsey, Lou, Grant, 
Otto, and U'oscoe; and Abram married Man Jackson and the) had 
three children — Leslie, Ola, and Bertha. Mdm - Keever was reared 
to manhood on the old homestead farm, in Dalton township, duly 
availing himself of the advantages of the > mimon schools, lie 



BIOGRAPHICAL 453 

continued to be actively identified with agricultural pursuits after 
initiating his independent career, which occupation he followed 
throughout life, until his death in 1885. lie was well known and 
highly esteemed in this county and, while never an aspirant for 
public office, gave a zealous support to the cause of the Republican 
party. He married Sarah Bales, daughter of John Bales, who came 
to Indiana at the age of nine years, in 1808, with his father, Jacob 
Bales. The Bales family located in Dalton township and John 
Bales resided there until i860, when he removed to Randolph coun- 
ty and died there in 1884. Of the three children horn to Moses 
Keever and wife, the subject of this sketch is the eldest; Clara is 
the wife of William Root, a farmer of Dalton township, and they 
have three children — Everett E., Charles P., and John C. ; and a 
brother, Oliver P., died when eighteen months old. John C. Keever 
secured his preliminary educational training in the public schools 
of Dalton township. lie began farming for himself when eighteen 
years old, renting land two years, and then purchased a farm of 
eighty acres, to which he later added two tracts — one of twenty 
and one of sixty— -both in Dalton township, and this land he oper- 
ated until 1905, when he purchased the place where he resides, 
consisting of twenty-one acres, retaining the other farms. In addi- 
tion he owns fifteen acres north of his residence and another tract 
of forty acres, making his total landed possessions 236 acres, lie 
is an up-to-date farmer and stock raiser, enterprising, and a man of 
affairs in his township. In his political allegiance Mr. Keever is 
found arrayed as a loyal supporter of the cause of the Republican 
party. On Oct. 20, 1875, Mr. Keever was united in marriage to 
Miss Romana Lamb, daughter of Caleb and Cecelia ( Locke) Lamb, 
the former of whom died in 1910, aged seventy-three years. The 
mother died in 1898, aged sixty-one years. Caleb Lamb was a na- 
tive of Henry county, Indiana, and was a carpenter by trade, also 
followed farming. In the later years of his life he lived retired at 
Greensboro, Henry county, Indiana. He was a member of the 
regiment commanded by Sol. Meredith during the Civil war. His 
wife was bom in Perry township, and of their union was one child, 
Romana, born Oct. 8, 1859. Mr. ami Mrs. Keever, having no chil- 
dren, reared Ernest Anderson from the age of seven years to man- 
hood. He married Amy Baldwin and they had a daughter. Lulu 
Fern, born July 18, 1896. When the daughter was seven years old 
the mother died, and Mr. and Mrs. Keever took the daughter, who 
is now in the first year at high school. Mr. and Mrs. Keever are 
members of the West River Friends' Church. 

Albert Nathan Chamness is one of the younger generation of 
farmers of Dalton township and the success which he lias achieved 
in life marks him as a man of more than ordinary acquirements. 
He was born in Randolph count)-, Indiana, Sept. 19, 1873, son of 
Mahlon H. and Emily (Hodgin) Chamness, born in Randolph 
county, the father on Jan. 24, 1840. The paternal grandfather was 
Joshua Chamness, who came from North Carolina and located at 
Green's Fork, in Wayne county, and later removed to Randolph 
county, where he resided until his death. He was a strong \boli- 



454 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

tionisl and his convictions on the slavery question caused his emi- 
gration from North Carolina, lie was married to Hannah Cham- 
ness and shortly afterward came to Indiana. After six years he re- 
turned to North Carolina and brought his father — William Cham- 
ness — and mother to Indiana. In the family of Joshua Chamness 
were five children: Isaac married Elizabeth Dennis ami they had 
six children— Marion", Milton, Esther, Maggie, Elmina, and Lizzie; 
Mary became the wife of Jesse Pidgeon, of Dailon township, and 
they had eight children — David, William, Martha, Lizzie, Belle, 
Wilson, Ella, and John; Isabella received an injury which rendered 
her an invalid for thirteen years and is living in the village of 
Franklin; Mahlon II. is the next in order of birth; and Rachel is 
the wife of David Morris, of California, and they have six children — 
Lizzie (a missionary to the Esquimaux in Alaska), Lincoln, berth.', 
Belle, Lenna, and Albert. Mahlon 11. Chamness was reared in 
Randolph county and followed farming all of his active career, his 
farm adjoining the old homestead. lie now lives retired with Ins 
sister, Isabella, in the village of Franklin. II is wife, who died Nov. 
24, 1908, was Emily Hodgin, daughter of Nathan and Mournen 
(Coffin) Hodgin, who lived for many years in Wayne county, and 
Nathan Hodgin died in Fountain City, in 1902, at the advanced 
age of ninety years. Emily (Hodgin) Chamness was one of eight 
children born to her parents, the others being: Abigail, who mar- 
ried Asa Fond, of Grant county; Eunice, who married James 
Bunch, a minister of the Friends' church in Oklahoma; Ruth, who 
married Allen Thorne, of Fountain City; Martha, who married 
Caldwell Townsend, of Grant county; Milton, who resides at Foun- 
tain City, married Malinda Reese, and after her death was wedded 
to Mrs. Mahala (bales) Jackson; and Rosa, who is the wife of 
Rollie Collins, of Fountain City. Mahlon bb Chamness and wife 
became the parents of two children : Lorinda A. is the wife of 
Oliver P. Shafer, a farmer of Henry county, and they have two chil- 
dren — Roscoe D. and Elbert M.; and Albert N. Albert N. Cham- 
ness received his primary education in the public schools of Ran- 
dolph county and was reared to the occupation of a farmer. After 
reaching man's estate he entered the hardware and well drilling 
business, under the linn name of Shafer & Chamness, at Moore- 
land, Bid., and that occupation he followed for a period of seven 
years. He then began farming in Perry township, this county, and 
two years later located in Dalton township. In 1902 he purchased 
the farm of J 43 acres, whereon he has since followed general farm- 
ing, and in addition operates an extensive maple syrup plant in 
season. For fourteen years he also followed the threshing busi- 
ness. His farm has the advantages of a very fertile soil and ill 
modern improvements. Mr. Chamness is a Republican in his po- 
litical affiliations and his religious faith is expressed by member- 
ship in the Friends' church. In 1904 he was elected trustee of 
Dalton township and held that office one term His early educa- 
tional equipment has fitted him for any position in life. After 
completing the course of the common schools he attended Danville 
College, at Danville, lnd., and later took a course in Ball Busi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 455 

ness College at Muneie. On Oct. 9, 1895, occurred the marriage 
of Mr. Charmless to Miss Rebecca E. lliatt, the ceremony being 
performed according to the rites of the Friends' marriage ceremony, 
and the marriage was solemnized in the Friends church at Econ- 
omy. .Airs. Chamness is a daughter of Oliver and Emma (Ed- 
wards) Iliatt, of Perry township, and of this union there have been 
born two children — Vaughan Oliver, horn April 26, 1 Sij.S, and 
Helen Celia, born Oct. 6, 1904. The parents 'of Mrs. Chamness are 
natives of Wayne county, and the father has followed farming all 
of his active career. To him and his estimable wife were born 
three children: Lawrence, who resides in Randolph county, mar- 
ried Nellie Frazier, who bore him three children — Mildred, Pauline, 
and Wilber— and after her death he married Mr-. Lydia (Hill) 
Love; Mis. Chamness, who is the second in order 1 if birth, was horn 
on March, 15, 1877; and Celia is the wile of Glenn Shively, a farmer 
of Miami count}', ami they have a daughter, Margaret. 

Bertsch Family. — The following is the result of an attempt to 
secure an account of the Bertsch family in the line of descent 
from the first American ancestor to those of the name who are 
now so prominently connected with industrial affairs in Wayne 
count}. Christian Bertsch was the immigrant to America and 
came in the later days of the Colonial period. There is a general 
agreement among those of his descendants who are well informed 
that the name is of French origin. It was and has been spelled in 
various ways. In the French language it is pronounced as if 
spelled "Bar-shay." Jn Pennsylvania it has often been transformed 
into Bartsch, Barge, Berge, and into other forms of spelling. It 
is claimed by some that the proper way is Bartsch and that Bertsch 
is the German form. However, in the old records of Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania, the name is spelled Bertsch, so far as Chris- 
tian, the immigrant, is concerned. There is another agreement 
that this first immigrant came from the Province of Alsace, which 
was at one time a portion of Eastern France hut, since 1871, a 
part of the German Empire, along with Lorraine. From these 
provinces came much of the Protestant-Huguenot immigration to 
America, fleeing from religions persecution, and the majority of 
them adhered to the Reformed denomination. Christian Bertsch 
could speak both the German and French languages, as was com- 
monly the case with his countrymen, who lived in a region which 
had alternately been under the sway of both the French and Ger- 
man governments. According to the records of Egypt Church, of 
Lehigh count}-, Pennsylvania, he was born Aug. 17, 1753. So far 
as the records have been searched there is no data showing the 
exact time when he came to America, but it was doubtless before 
the Revolution and when he was a boy or young man. According 
to tradition and also the records among the Pennsylvania archives, 
Christian Bertsch was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, lie 
was at that period a young man of from twenty-three to twenty- 
eight years. In the archives he is mentioned, in Book 4, page 601, 
as serving under Captain Serfus in the first class of the Northamp- 
ton county militia, in actual service in the United States army. 



456 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

The regiment was under command of Col. Christian Shaus. This 
is recorded Sept. 22, 1781. Nearly twenty years later, in the 
troublesome period of the "Whisky Rebellion," led by John Freas, 
he again took up arms in defense of the National government. This 
occurred about 1799, and as he marched away from home his son, 
Christian, then a boy of eight years, recollected seeing his mother 
crying as the father left the door of their home. The insurgents 
had dispersed into marauding bands in that part of Northampton 
county where Christian Bertsch resided, so he, with others, built 
a fort and stocked it with arms and provisions, making ready for 
defense against a siege. He was then in the prime of life, being 
about forty-six years old. The marriage of Christian Bertsch took 
place in the period of the Revolution, about the year 1779. His 
wife is supposed to have been of a German family, though this is 
not certain. Her name was Julianna Seiberling (sometimes spelled 
Seyberling in the old records). She was born Sept. 12, 1758, and 
a very long life appears to have been granted her, as her death 
occurred Sept. 7, 1837, at the age of seventy-nine years. The chil- 
dren of this union were ten in number, born on the following dates: 
Margaretta, March 24, 1780; Maria Barbara, June 13, 1782; Juli- 
anna, Aug. 1, 1784; Magdalena, March 5, 1786; Julianna (second), 
March 22, 1789; Christian, Jr., Oct. 22, 1791 ; Maria Mary, June 13, 
1797; John, 1793; Jacob, and Daniel, Dec. 20, 1801. Christian 
Bertsch and wife Julianna are buried at Cherryville, Northampton 
county, Pennsylvania, and the name on the tombstone is spelled 
"Berge." Christian was an extensive land owner and most of his 
sons were well-to-do farmers, one being an extensive owner and 
operator of coal mines. Christian was one of the foremost men in 
the congregation of Egypt Church and was one of the largest and 
best contributors, presenting a Bible to the congregation in 1780. 
Jacob Bertsch, his ninth child in order of birth, was a prosperous 
farmer. He married Barbara Apt and of this union were born 
children, among whom was Adam Bertsch, father of Charles Adam 
Bertsch, founder and present head of the manufacturing firm of 
Bertsch & Company, at Cambridge City, thi^ county. Adam 
Bertsch, father of Charles A., was a prominent farmer in Butler 
county, Ohio, where he resided until 1864, when he removed to 
Wayne county, Indiana. He was an industrious and frugal man, 
with an unusually sympathetic nature. He was a Lutheran in his 
religious faith and took a serious and active interest in the church 
and its affairs. The maiden name of his wife was Elizabeth 
Jacoby and among their children was Charles Adam Bertsch, 
heretofore mentioned. Charles Adam Bertsch was born at Hickory 
Flat, Butler county, Ohio, Oct. 20, 185 1, and came to Wayne coun- 
ty with his parents in his seventh year; and with the exception of 
several short intervals has spent his life in Wayne county. He 
received his early scholastic training in the public schools of Wayne 
county and began his independent career by renting and operating 
for a time a grist mill near llagerstown. He i^ the inventor of the 
Diamond Burr Dresser. While still engaged in the grist mill' busi- 
ness he purchased, fattened, and sold cattle and hogs, and later 



BIOGRAPHICAL 457 

continued in the cattle business in Missouri one year. Returning 
to Wayne county, lie purchased and operated two meat markets in 
Cambridge City and finally formed a partnership in that business 
with his brother, J. J. Bertsch. About this time he again spent 
several months in the West — in Kansas — buying, fattening, and 
shipping cattle and hogs. Later he and his brother, J. J. Bertsch, 
purchased the Cambridge City Agricultural & Machine Works, 
which they operated and managed under that name, manufacturing 
agricultural implements, until the firm name and kind of output 
were changed, in 1884, Charles A. Bertsch having invented several 
valuable and useful patents during that time in the line of agri- 
cultural implements. In 1884 the firm name became Bertsch & 
Company, but the ownership remained unchanged. At this time 
the company began to build small tinner's squaring shears and 
forming" rolls, and the present business has been built up by the 
manufacture of that line of tools — punches, shears, and rolls for 
punching, cutting, and rolling plates, structural shapes, and sheet 
metal. They are used in shipyards, railroad shops, rolling mills, 
sheet iron shops, boiler shops, structural iron shops, tank works, 
etc. The company has built several of these machines, each of 
which weighed fifty-five tons. They have been shipped to every 
State in the Union and to Canada, Australia, South America, Japan, 
and England. The brother, J. J. Bertsch, died in 1803, am l m 1 ^>97 
Charles A. Bertsch purchased from his brother's heirs their inter- 
est in the business, and has since been the sole owner and pro- 
prietor. From his boyhood days lie has been a loyal supporter and 
worker in the Lutheran church at East Germantown and is one 
of its most liberal contributors. In the matter of politics he es- 
pouses the Democratic cause. Mr. Bertsch married .Miss Susanna 
Anna Howard, of Cambridge City, daughter of the late Isaiah 
and Mary Ann (Berg) Howard. Isaiah Howard was born in York 
county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 22, 1813. Ten children came to bless 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bertsch, and of them the following 
specific mention is appropriately made: Lawrence Howard Bertsch 
was born Oct. 18, 1879; graduated in the Cambridge City High 
School in 1897, and in the Indianapolis Business University in 1898; 
from 1898 to 1901 he was a student at Earlham College; received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts at the Indiana University in 1902, 
and that of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from 
the University of Michigan in 1907; is the mechanical engineer for 
the firm of Bertsch & Company, at Cambridge City ; in politics is 
a Democrat and was the Democratic candidate for Joint Repre- 
sentative from Wayne and Fayette counties in 1910; is a member 
of the Sigma Chi fraternity, the Masonic lodge, the Richmond 
Country Club, and his religious affiliations are with the Lutheran 
church. Walter Raymond Bertsch was born July 18, 1881, at 
Cambridge City; was educated in the Cambridge City High School 
and at Indiana University; is employed as assistant manager of 
the firm of Bertsch & Company ; is a Republican in politics and is 
a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity. Nina Ethel Bertsch was 
born Nov. 29, 1882. Joshua Alvin Bertsch was born at Cambridge 



458 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

City, March 18, 1885; graduated in the Cambridge City High 
School in 1905 ; from 1905 to 1907 was a student of mechanical 
engineering in the University of Michigan, and from 190740 1909 
in the Indiana University, and is the present superintendent of the 
linn of Bertsch & Company; he is independent in politics and has 
membership in the Sigma Chi fraternity. Harry Exert Bertsch 
was born in Cambridge City, Nov. 29, 188C; graduated in the 
Cambridge City High School in 1906; in the years 1906-1907 was 
a student of mechanical engineering in the University of Michigan, 
ami from [908 to 1910 in the Indiana University, and is now as- 
sistant superintendent of the linn of Bertsch & Company ; he is 
independent in politics and has membership in the Sigma Chi fra- 
ternity. The names of the other children, with the dates of their 
respective births follow: Mary Elizabeth, April -7, 1889; Hazel 
Anna, April i<>, 1802; Ruth Ophelia, Jan. 6, 1894; Robert Oscar, 
Jan. 15, 1896; and Charles Russell, born March 23, i<;oo, died on 
March 2~, of the same year. The paternal grandfather of Mrs 
Bertsch was Henry Howard, born in England, and her maternal 
grandfather was David Berg, born in Lancaster count), Pennsyl- 
vania, of German parents. David Berg was married on Feb. 22, 
1820, to Magdalena Newcomer, bom in 1782, and her parents also 
came from Germany. 

Thaddeus E. Frazer, who operates the Adam II. Bartel Com- 
pany's establishment at Cambridge City, manufacturers of Perfec- 
tion overalls, shirts, suits, pants, duck coats, etc., was born near 
Greenup, 111., west of Terre Haute, Ind., Nov. 13, 1869. His father 
was Paul and his mother was Irena (Coggshall) Frazer. The 
father, a son of Alexander Frazer (see sketch of George Frazer for 
ancestral history), was born in Pennsylvania, was a fanner by oc- 
cupation, and had lived in Wayne county for some years prior to 
his removal to Illinois, where his death occurred about 1881. The 
mother died ( )ct. 21, igii, at Cambridge City, Ind. They were 
the parents of three children, of whom Ellen and Emma are de- 
ceased and Thaddeus F. is the sole survivor. He is the last born 
of the children; his earl)' education was obtained at Williamsburg, 
and this was further supplemented by a course in the Indiana Slate 
Normal. I lis first work in life was school teaching, and this pro- 
fession was followed for two years at Williamsburg. After that 
period he entered the drygoods store of Edwards & Lewis, at Wil- 
liamsburg, later with \V. A. Clems, at Fountain City, remaining 
six years with each of these firms. He came to Cambridge City 
in 1902, and on July 18 of that year organized the Adam II. Bartel 
Manufacturing Company's plant, of which he has since been the 
manager. Of this company, A. II. Bartel is the president, John M. 
Coate vice-president, Fred J. Bartel treasurer, Ida E. Bartel, secre- 
tary, and T. F. Frazer, manager, while the board of directors in- 
clude in addition the names of Benjamin G. Bartel and F. W. Fled 
derjohn. The factory has about 5,000 square feet of floor space 
and at the start gave employment to about thirty-five people, but 
now from sixty to seventy-five people are regularly employed. 
Fight traveling salesmen are on the road and the products of the 



DIOGRAPHICAL 459 

factory are sold direct to jobbers and retailers. Electric lights 
and power are used in the building, which is heated with steam 
throughout. In November, 1896, was celebrated Thaddeus E. 
Erazer's marriage to Miss Maggie Wright, of Economy, Ind., who 
for eight years was a teacher in the schools of that place. Mr. 
Frazer is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Cornelius M. Connell, who is actively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits and who maintains an attractive farm residence in Wash- 
ington township, is one of the honored and distinctively popular 
citizens of the county, lie is a native of Wayne county, Indiana, 
having" been born in Washington township, a son of Morris and 
Hannah (Sullivan) Connell, born in Ireland. They came to the 
United States and located in Washington township, Wayne coun- 
ty. Indiana, where the father followed farming. Later he removed 
to Connersville, Ind., where he was engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness twelve years, and then engaged in farming in Fayette county, 
where he died. The mother passed away when Cornelius M. was 
a small boy, and both parents were consistent members of the 
Catholic church. They became the parents of live children: 
Cornelius M. ; Mary, the wife of John McDumich, a mechanic of 
Connersville, Ind.; Catherine, the wife of Peter A. Coss, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Anna, deceased ; and William, a mechanic at Conners- 
ville, Ind. By a subsequent marriage of the father there were five 
children: Elizabeth, the widow of a Air. Mailey, resides at Con- 
nersville; Nellie, the wife of Andrew llerrahl, a farmer of Conners- 
ville; and Margaret, Alice, and Morton, a telegraph operator, all 
of whom reside in Connersville, Ind. The father was a man of 
strong individuality and impregnable integrity — one who ever com- 
manded the unqualified confidence and regard of his fellow men. 
lie took a loyal interest in public affairs and was a supporter of 
the cause of the Democratic party from the time of his arrival in 
America until his death. Cornelius M. Connell was reared at the 
parental home and his early educational advantages were those 
afforded in the public schools of Connersville. lie continued to 
be associated with the work of the home farm until his father's 
death, and then, in 1808, purchased his present place of forty acres 
in Washington township, where he built a residence and has since 
resided, engaged in general farming. In politics Mr. Connell is 
aligned as a loyal advocate of the principles of the Democratic 
party, and he and his wife hold membership in St. Elizabeth's 
Catholic Church. Cambridge City, in which faith he was reared. 
On Nov. 3, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Connell to 
Miss Catherine Creighton, daughter of Patrick and Winifred (Jor- 
dan) Creighton, of Jackson township, Wayne county, Indiana. 
The parents were born in Ireland, but came to the United States 
and settled in Jackson township, where Mr. Creighton followed 
farming, which industry engrossed his attention during the major 
portion of his active business career, lie and his wife are both 
deceased. Mr. Creighton was a Democrat in politics, and both 
he and his wife were zealous members of the Catholic church. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Connell has been bom a daughter, Agnes, born 



4^)0 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

July 19, 1900. The living children of Patrick and Winifred (Jor- 
dan) Creighton are: Mary, widow of William Kirt, of Rushville ; 
John, of Fayette county; Anna, of Rushville; Airs. Council is the 
next in order of birth; and Dennis, of Fayette county. 

Ellis D. Filby, proprietor of the Cambridge City Cigar Com- 
pany, was born in that city, April 18, 1864. llis father was John 
Filby, born in Pennsylvania, lie was a cigar manufacturer by 
trade and in early manhood removed to Cambridge City, Ind., 
where he followed that vocation until the breaking out of the Civil 
war. Then he enlisted as a private and served valiantly as a sol- 
dier of the Union, lie died about three months after being dis 
charged from the army. He was married to Anna M. Smith, who 
survives him and resides in Cambridge City, and of this union was 
born an only child, whose name introduces this review. Mrs. 
Filby is also a native of Pennsylvania. Ellis D. Filby was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Cambridge City, and after his 
schools days were completed began life's work in the store of F. 
R. Hastings & Son, after which he was a traveling salesman for 
safes, in the employ of IF D. Cary, two years. At the expiration 
of that period, about 1888, he started a feed and implement store 
in partnership with E, W. Whelan. This partnership was later 
dissolved, Mr Filby taking the grocery department, and he con 
tinned in this line of endeavor until January, 1890. lie then re- 
moved to Indianapolis, but in June of the same year returned to 
Cambridge City and formed a partnership with E. R. [Tastings. 
Later he disposed of his interest in this business to Mr. Hastings 
and went on the road as a traveling salesman for the William 
Doney Cigar Company, in which capacity he served until 1897, 
and then for a time handled a line of furniture on the road. He 
then became associated with Frank Ohmit in the cigar brokerage 
business, which developed into the Cambridge City Cigar Company 
in 1903, in which A. W. Bradbury became a partner. On July 6. 
1906, Mr. Filby purchased the interest of Mr. Bradbury, a fire hav 
ing occurred at this time, and has since been the sole proprietor, 
doing a jobbing business in cigars, tobaccos, pipes, and smokers' 
articles of all kinds. Two men are kept constantly on the road 
and they cover all of Indiana and as far east as Dayton, < )hio. The 
business has grown to considerable extent under the management 
of Mr. Fill)y. His duties as a citizen have not been neglected ami 
the office of trustee of the Fifth ward of Cambridge City is now 
held by him. He is placed among the first citizens of the com 
munity and ranks among the most progressive in Cambridge City. 
On June 18, 1890, was celebrated his marriage to Miss Lillian 
Maud Cole, daughter of Joseph J. and Margaret (Thomas) Cole, 
of Connersville, Ind. Her parents are natives of Fayette county, 
Indiana, and the father is now a retired farmer, living in Conners- 
ville. A daughter, Helen Cole, has been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Filby. Fraternally, Mr. Filby is a member of the Masonic order, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of 
Pythias, and he also has membership in the Travelers' Protective 
Association and the Indiana Travelers' Association. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 461 

Joseph A. Commons, a substantial citizen of Wayne county, 
now living retired, was horn on a farm in Center township, May 
22, 1842, son of David Commons. The paternal grandfather was 
Robert Commons, born in Ireland of English parentage, 111 1748, 
and removed in infancy with his father's family to Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, lie was married to Ruth Mayes and removed to 
West Virginia in 170-', and thence, in 1812, to Center township, 
Wayne county, Indiana, locating a mile. and a hall northwest of 
Centerville, where he resided until his death, Dec. 19, 1837, aged 
eighty-nine years. To him and his wife, whom he married in 
Pennsylvania, were born nine children: Lydia married Adam 
Davis in Virginia, removed to North Carolina and thence, in [811, 
to Washington county, Indiana, and finally to Mercer county, Illi- 
nois; Phehe married Jesse Bond; Isaac came to Whitewater in 
1807, married Mary, daughter of John Townsend, and in 1810 set- 
tled seven miles north of Richmond, in what is now branklin town- 
ship; William married Sarah Brady; John married Elizabeth 
Mote, of Ohio; Ezekiel married Sarah Julian; Hannah married 
Greenbury Cornelius in Virginia, and they both died in Center 
township in 1824.; Nathan married Martha, daughter of Patrick 
Heard; and David, father of Joseph A., was the youngest of the 
nine children, lie was born in Grayson county (now West Vir- 
ginia), July 18, 1800, and came with his father to Center township 
in 1812. He was reared on the pioneer homestead ami in 183!) pur- 
chased a farm, on which was a small mill for grinding corn, lie 
rebuilt this mill in 1839 and furnished it with two runs of buhrs, 
one for grinding wheat and one for corn, lie also built a saw 
mill and, in 1838, erected the brick residence now owned by his son, 
Walter S. He was a man of energy and endurance ami was in 
advance of the time in the affairs of the day. In 1836 he was 
elected commissioner of Wayne county and served three terms. 
In 1847 ne was elected to represent Wayne county in the State 
legislature and seiwed two terms. He was an extensive farmer, 
real estate owner and a breeder of line stock. He was very public- 
spirited, was energetic in securing pike roads, and was one of the 
builders of the Indiana Central railroad, being one of its directors 
for years. He was also one of the organizers and a director of the 
Centerville National Rank, and in politics was a Republican. In 
1838, after the death of his father, he removed to the farm he had 
owned for many years, and there he died Feb. 7, 1874. He was 
married Feb. 26, 1824, to Rachel, daughter of John and Rachel 
Mote, of Miami county, Ohio, and had by her two sons — John, who 
married Eliza Jane, daughter of John Boyd, and Philip S., who 
married Hannah Ann, daughter of John Maxwell. The first wife 
died May 22, 1827, and on Sept. 29, 1831, Mr. Commons married 
Bethena, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Jones) Carter, and a 
native of Greeneville, Tenn., born Aug. 13, 1813. Of this union 
were born seven children : Sarah A. is the deceased wife ot Thom- 
as Jordan, of Indianapolis; William M. died Aug. 25, 1853; Isaac 
E. died in Evansville, Tenn.; Robert D. served three years in the 
Civil war with the Eighth Indiana infantry and was wounded 'at 



462 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Vicksburg, May 22, 1863; Joseph A. is the next in order of birth; 
Mary E. is the widow of Ira Izor and resides in Indianapolis; and 
Walter S. (see sketch). Joseph and Elizabeth (Jones) Carter, 
parents of Mrs. Commons, came to Indiana in 1X20 and settled in 
Madison county. They became the parents of thirteen children — 
Wesley, Mary, Bethena, Usiah, John C, J Iila.li, Edward J.. Joseph, 
William, James C, Thomas K., Nancy, and Levi, all deceased. Jo- 
seph A. Commons attended the common schools, Earlham College, 
and the Miami Commercial College at Dayton, Ohio. After finish- 
ing his scholastic work he was engaged with his father and 
brother, Robert 1)., in the milling business, located at the old 
homestead, and he so continued until the fall of 1868, when he 
purchased a farm of 245 acres, three miles north of Centerville, on 
the Williamsburg pike. During the three years immediately fol- 
lowing he devoted his attention to the management of this farm, 
and in 1872 removed to Centerville and purchased the place which 
was the residence of Sylvester Johnston, remodeling the same in 
1874. From 1872 to 1879 he was engaged in the live stock busi- 
ness, shipping hogs, cattle, horses, etc., to the Eastern markets, 
and in 1870 he purchased the saw mill of the John Sintz estate, and 
conducted that about twenty years. While engaged in the saw 
mill business he purchased a farm of sixty acres, lying one-half 
mile south of Centerville, ami to this he later added too acres ad- 
joining, the 160 acres having formerly been the home of Levi Fox, 
the father of Judge Henry C. Fox, of Richmond. After retiring 
from the saw mill business, in 10,02, Mr. Commons erected a num 
ber of suitable and modern horse barns and stables — models of 
their kind — on this farm, and gave his attention to fanning in a 
general way and to the raising of horses, mostly for track pur- 
poses. In i<;05 he retired from the active management of the 
place and his son, Lawrence D., assumed it. Mr. Commons is a 
public-spirited and generous man and has been a recognized leader 
in public affairs, having served as guardian and administrator of 
a number of estates. He was for years connected with the Wayne 
County Agricultural Association, and was superintendent and di- 
rector for several years when it met on the grounds south of Cen- 
terville. In the matter of politics Mr. Commons is allied with the 
Republican party and he has served two terms as trustee of Cen- 
ter township. His second term in this position was cut short by 
his resignation, a change in the law effecting the office of town- 
ship trustee. He was also elected as Representative in the State 
legislature from Wayne county, in which position he served two 
terms, lie has been treasurer of the school board of the village of 
Centerville at intervals during the past twenty-one years, and for 
the past twelve years he has served in that position consecutively. 
In his fraternal relation he is a Scottish Rite Mason, being a mem- 
ber of the Indiana Consistory at Indianapolis. On Nov. 28, 1868, 
Mr. Commons was married to Amanda Beeson, daughter of David 
11. and Rebecca (Bice) Beeson, of Wayne county. Mrs. Commons 
was born June 30, 1849, anc ^ ner death occurred Oct. 2, 1906. Of 
this union was born a son, Lawrence D. Commons, who died Oct. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 463 

3, 191 1. He was married on April 25, 1895, to Ella, daughter of 
Thomas and Martha McConaha, and of that union there is a son, 
Howard, horn Feb. 21, 1S96. The "Western Horseman" of Oet. 6, 
191 1, has the following to say in regard to the death of Lawrence 
1). Commons: '"Indiana has lost another of its prominent breeders 
and trainers in the death of Lawrence 1). Common.^, of Centerville, 
Ind. lie was a young man who had attained more than a fair share 
of fame, as a breeder, trainer, and driver. At the Commons' stock 
farm at Centerville the well known stallion 'Anderson Wilkes,' 
was the premier, and Mr. Commons had surrounded himself with 
a small but select group of brood mares. In addition to his breed- 
ing and farming operations, Mr. Commons each season campaigned 
a small stable over the tracks of the Middle West. This year Mr. 
Commons was very successful with the three-year-old pacing filly, 
'Grace IV by 'Anderson Wilkes,' which he raced on the half-mile 
tracks in Ohio and Indiana, and after he was taken ill, late in Au- 
gust, this filly was turned over to Curt Gosnell, who gave her a 
world's record uf 2:10 [-4, for a three-year-old pacing till)' in a 
race over a half-mile track. Mr. Commons' death will come as a 
shock to a large number of friends, for although his death was not 
expected by bis immediate relatives, yet the fact that be had raced 
up to the middle of the season led many to believe that he was en- 
joying bis usual health." 

Solomon Ebersol, deceased, for many years prominent as an 
agriculturist near Olive Hill, Wayne comity, was born in Cumber- 
land county, Pennsylvania, April 12, 1803, son of Jacob and Bar- 
bara (Schalley) Ebersol. lie resided in Pennsylvania until 1850, 
when he came with his family to Wayne county, Indiana, and set- 
tled on a farm north of Olive Hill, where he spent the residue of his 
life. He continued in the active management of the farm until bis 
death, in 1877. Reside the members of his immediate family he 
left a wide circle of friends to mourn his passing. In November, 
1826, was celebrated Mr. Ebersol's marriage to Anna Longenecker, 
born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and of this union were 
six children: Joseph, born Aug. 26, 1828, Jacob, bom Feb. 8, 1830, 
and Sarah, bom Dec. 10, 1833, died of scarlet fever on the 7th, 8th, 
and 9th of January, 1839, respectively; Mary Jane, bom April 25, 
[836, was married on Dec. 27, 1853, to William Culbertson ; George 
W ., born Jan. 13, 1841, was married on April 7, 1805, to Mary Jane 
King, and died Jan. 9, 1903; and Ellen lb, born Nov. 19, 1844, was 
married on Aug. 2J, 1868, to Harland Bond. Georye W. spent two 
or three years at Earlham College, after which he taught school 
two years and then engaged in farming. After his marriage he 
moved to the obi Daniel King farm and resided there until bis 
death. Of his union with Mary Jane King were three children: 
Vashti K., born Jan. 25, 1867, was married to John Davis, fan; iS,. 
1888; Charles G., born June 25, 1871, was married to Laura Snyder, 
July 3, 1891 ; and Ida M., born Oct. nj, 1873, was married to An- 
drew J. McKinney (see sketch). George Ebersol's wife was the 
daughter of Daniel and Maria (McAlister) King, among the oldest 
settlers of Wayne county. Daniel was a son of Jesse and Cinthia 



464 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

King, of English descent. They came to Wayne county from Bour- 
bon county, Kentucky, in the year 1815, and located on what is 
now known as the "Beeson farm." A few years later they entered 
land north of Green's Fork and lived there the remainder of their 
lives. They were the parents of sixteen children: John, born 
May 13, 1783; Elizabeth, born Nov. 21, 1784; James, born April 10. 
1780; Mary Jane, born Sept. 15, 1787; Samuel, born March 1, 1789; 
Joseph, born May 1, 1790; Elisha, horn Oct. 11, 1791 ; Rebecca, 
born Feb. 1, 1793; Daniel, born Nov. 1, 1794; Nancy, born May 19, 
'797 5 Sarah, horn Jan. 1, 1799; Anna, horn March 10, 1801 ; Elijah, 
born Aug. 10, 1803; Jane, born May 6, 1805; Eorenzo, horn Aug. 7, 
1807; and Presley, "born May 5, 1809. In the year 1819 Daniel 
King entered government land, which he cleared and on which he 
built a house of logs, about three miles north of Centerville. lie 
was married to Maria McAlister, June 21, rS2I, and died at the 
home of his son, William, at Alexandria, Feb. 2, 1878. To him and 
his wife were horn seven children: James E., horn July 30, 18J4, 
died Oct. 12, 1853; John A., born Oct. 17, 182)), died Dec. 24, 1861 ; 
Newton, born Jul)' 25, 1828, was married to Sarah Burton, Dec. 31, 
1857, and died in 11)02; William M., born Aug. 10, 1830, was mar- 
ried to Cinthia Norris, Jan. 13, 1807, and died Aug. 10, 1909; Isaac 
Y.. horn Jan. 25, 1833, married Sarah Study in 1853 and died July 
17, 1910; Levi, born Jan. 20, 1837, married Demaris Chee.sman in 
1857 and died May 5, 1910; and Mary Jane, horn Sept. 4, 1842, mar- 
ried George Ebersol, April 7, 1865, and died July 10, 1903. 

James Columbus King, a successful farmer of Center town- 
ship, whose homestead is near the place of his birth, was born in 
Center township, this count)', Aug. 6, 1854, son of James W. D. 
and Malinda L. (Jackson) King. His paternal great-grandfather 
was Jesse King, a native of Kentucky, who came to Wayne county, 
Indiana, with a large family, in 1820, and settled near what is now 
the village of Green's Fork. Five of his sons — Samuel, Daniel, 
Elisha, Lorenzo D., and John — preceded him to Wayne county 
about two years. John King, the grandfather of James C, located 
about one and one-half miles north of Centerville, hut in 1830 
moved to a place just north of the village, where he spent the 
residue of his life, lie was a farmer by occupation and became 
one of the influential men of that locality. To him and his wife 
were born nine children: Lucinda, who became the wife of Joshua 
Eliason ; James W. D., the father of James C. ; Joseph ; William; 
Mary, who became the wife of Oliver T. Jones (see sketch of Lin- 
coln 11. Jones); Presley; Nancy, who became the wife of John M. 
Maxwell; Jackson; and Jesse. James W. D. King was horn Aug. 
12, 1814, in Kentucky and came with his parents to Wayne county 
when twelve years old. He received his education in the schools 
of Center township and followed farming during all of his active 
career. On March 26, 1835, he was married to Malinda L. Jack- 
son, born May 2, 1816, daughter of Caleb Jackson, and they reared 
a family of eleven children: John W. died in infancy; Olive be- 
came the wife of J. W. Boyd; Caleb W., a prominent citizen of 
Richmond, died in that place in 1911; William S. ; Joseph J. (see 



BIOGRAPHICAL 465 

sketch) ; Judith E. became the wife of John Meyers; Eliza A. be : 
came the wife of Jesse C. Stevens (see sketch) ; Sarah M. became 
the wife of William Smith; James C. is the next in order of birth; 
Lncinda became the wife of Charles Staats ; and Mark P. James 
W. D. King died Sept. 4, 1864, and his wife died July 24, 1879. 
James C. King received his preliminary educational training in the 
district schools of Center township and the schools ui Centerville. 
lie resided at home until twenty-five years old, at which time he 
became the owner of a farm which he inherited from his father's 
estate. He traded this land for the farm where he now resides', 
consisting of 115 acres, to the operation of which he has since de- 
voted his attention. In the matter of politics Mr. King espouses 
the cause of the Republican party, but has never sought office. In 
religious matters he is identified as a member of the Christian 
church. On Aug. 7, 1879, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss 
Rachel L. Martin, born in (enter township, Aug. 27, 1859, daughter 
of the late James B. and llilah Jane (Humbert) Martin (see 
sketch). To Mr. and Mrs. King were born six children: Edna 
May, born April 14, 1881, died Jan. 18, 1883; Florence |., born Nov. 
3, 1883, died Aug. 13, 1884; Clifford M.. born Nov. 1*9, 1885, is a 
graduate in the mechanical engineering course at Purdue Univer- 
sity and is located at Gary, hid., where he has the position of as- 
sistant rate-engineer in the American Steel Bridge Company; Clai- 
born F., born Oct. 12, 1888, resides at the parental home; Mabel, 
born May 31, 1892, graduated in the Centerville High School with 
the class of 1910, took one year in Earlham College and is en- 
gaged at teaching in Green township; Mark G., born Aug. 19, 1896, 
graduated in the district school in the spring of 1910 and is a stu- 
dent in the Centerville High School. In 1902 Mr. King became 
afflicted with muscular rheumatism, which has become very seri- 
ous in its manifestations, and he is in a crippled condition. His 
son, Claiborn F., manages the home farm. 

Charles M. Hurst, a popular farmer of Washington township, 
was born in that township, Wayne county, Indiana. Sept. 1, i860, 
son of Elijah and Maria ( Lewis) Hurst, natives of Washington 
township. The paternal great-grandparents were Jacob and Mary 
Hurst, born in Maryland of Irish ancestry. John Hurst, the grand- 
father of Charles M., was bom in Maryland in 1781, and in that 
State, in 1802, was married to Elizabeth Marshall. Shortly after 
his marriage, with his wife and his brother Benedict, he started for 
what was then called the Western Reserve. His wife's: father had 
given her a horse. The young husband arranged a pack saddle into 
which he placed their worldly goods, and with his wife on the 
horse, he and his brother walking, they started on their journey. 
In this way they traveled, stopping wherever night overtook them, 
on the plains or in the mountains, and they continued westward 
until their small amount of money was exhausted, this occurring 
near Hamilton, Ohio. There John Hurst sought employment. 
About the only kind of work to be found was clearing and rail 
splitting. Hard work, however, had no terrors for him. He took 
contracts for both himself and brother and together they worked 



466 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

early and late. In 1804 his wife gave birth to a child, and two years 
later another child was born to them. By 1807 he had accumulated 
a little sum, besides having supplied the meager wants of his little 
family, and that year they pushed further west, coming over into 
Indiana and making a permanent location in what afterward be- 
came Wayne county. He selected first an eighty-acre tract of land 
on Noland's Fork, built a rude cabin, and as soon as possible got his 
family comfortably located. When the land was placed on the 
market he entered same and, as after years showed, made a wise 
selection. Then he commenced in earnest the work of development 
and making a home. Soon he had a few acres under cultivation, 
and never from that time on did his family want for the necessaries 
of life, and ere many years had come and gone he was able to pro- 
vide them with some of the luxuries also. As soon as he got 
his land opened up he began raising corn and hogs, finding a mar- 
ket at Cincinnati, and later he dealt largely in stock, driving to the 
Cincinnati market. In his earnest efforts to make a home and ac- 
cumulate a competency on the frontier, Mr. Hurst was ably as- 
sisted by his good wife, who was a helpmate in the truest sense of 
that word. She, too, worked early and late to clothe and feed her 
family. In those days the spinning and weaving for the family 
were all done in the home. Both Mr. Hurst and his wife were 
noted for their hospitality and generosity, friend and stranger re- 
ceiving a welcome at their door, and the needy were never turned 
away empty handed. Mr. Hurst kept pace with the progress of the 
new settlement, or, rather, kept in advance of it, for he was always 
the first to give his support to any improvement or new invention. 
The first cooking stove in the community was bought for his 
home and in his parlor was placed the first ingrain carpet of the 
neighborhood. These "luxuries" came after the old cabin had van- 
ished and a commodious frame house had taken its place. As the 
years passed by and his prosperity increased, he invested in more 
land, until his estate comprised 2,000 acres of the best land in 
Wayne county. Hard work and exposure in all kinds of weather 
shortened his days, however, and he died in May, 1S38, at the age 
of fifty-seven years. His wife survived him until Nov. 5, 1850. The 
record of her children is as follows, the first two having been born 
in Ohio, the others in Indiana: Cyntha, Dec. 8, 1804; Benedict, 
Dec. 11, 1806; Bennett, Dec. 8, 1808; Sanford, April 5, 1811; Be- 
linda, Dec. 7, 1812; Marshall, Feb. 13, 1814; Isaac, Feb. 5, 1817; 
Anna, born April II, 1819, died young; Dickson, Dec. 7, 1821 ; 
twins, Elijah and Silva (wife of Robert Watt), Oct. 29, 1824; and 
Mary E. (wife of John Orr), July 12, 1827. John Hurst, though 
never aspiring to political honors, was a stanch Democrat, and to 
this party his descendants, with few exceptions, have given their 
support. Elijah Hurst, the father of Charles M., grew to manhood 
on his father's farm, and after his marriage settled in the same 
neighborhood. He cleared and improved a farm and devoted his 
active career to carrying forward the work inaugurated by his 
father. He inherited the many sterling characteristics of his worthy 
sire and, like him, has the confidence and respect of the entire 



BIOGRAPHICAL 467 

community. He is now living retired with his son, Charles M. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Maria Lewis, was the daughter 
of Caleb and Polly (Willits) Lewis, born April 4, 1835, and died 
Nov. 8, 1906. Caleb Lewis was born in Virginia, Feb. 22, 1793, of 
Welsh parentage, and came to Wayne county in 1815 He was a 
son of George and Leah (Viney) Lewis, who passed their lives and 
died in the Old Dominion, both being representatives of old Vir- 
ginia families. Their children were Caleb, John, Charles, Leah, 
and Attie. Upon coming to Indiana Caleb Lewis located at Center- 
vi lie, where he clerked and taught school prior to his marriage and 
afterward turned his attention to farming. For a few years he 
farmed on a small place south of Centerville. Selling that farm, 
he bought a large tract of land on Green's Fork, some 300 acres, 
on which he lived for forty years, most of his children being born 
there, and during that long period health and prosperity were 
theirs and there was not a death in his family. In their declining 
vears he and his wife retired to Milton, where her death occurred 
Aug. 20, i8(>(), and he passed away Feb. 24, 1870. They were con- 
sistent members of the Franklin Christian Church. Caleb Lewis 
was a man above the ordinary in intelligence and education and 
in the community in which he lived was looked upon as a leader. 
An ardent Republican, he was the choice of his party for a number 
of local positions of trust, which he filled most acceptably, and 
two terms he represented his county in -the Indiana State legisla- 
ture. His wife was a native of Ohio. Elijah Hurst and Maria 
Lewis were married Dec. 25, 1855, and to them were born six 
children: ( Hive is the wife of Charles A. Murray, of Denver, Colo.; 
Emma is the widow of the late Peter S. Buler, of Richmond ; 
Charles M. is the next in order of birth; Ella is the wife of W. J. 
Hubbard, of Indianapolis, Ind..; Lewis resides in Denver, Colo.; 
and Walter died in infancy. The father is a stanch Democrat in 
his political affiliations. Charles M. Hurst was born at the home- 
stead where he lives, a part of which was entered by his grand- 
father in 1814. He received his educational training in the com- 
mon schools of Washington township and at DePauw University. 
When he had completed his scholastic training he began work on 
his father's farm, afterward purchasing 180 acres, upon which 
he erected the buildings, and there does general farming and stock- 
feeding. There is no detail of the agricultural industry which he 
does not thoroughly know. On Oct. 23, 1884, Mr. Hurst was 
united in marriage to Mary Fidelia Clawson, daughter of James 
S. and Mai)- (Ice) Clawson, of Henry county, Indiana, and of this 
union were born four children: Portie, deceased; Paul C, born 
Feb. 25, 1890, received his education in the Washington Township 
High School and at DePauw University; Howard E.. born June 
24, 1895, received his preliminary education in the Washington Town- 
ship High School and is now in Earlham College; and Norma F., 
born Oct. 27, 1899, is attending the common schools. Mr. Hurst 
is a Democrat in his political views, as was his father and grand- 
father, and he and his wife and one son are members of the Chris- 
tian church. 



468 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Isaac J. Spahr, farmer, was born in Abington township, Wayne 
county, Indiana, March 19, 1856, son of Joseph D. and Matilda 
(Burgess) Spahr. The paternal great-grandfather was Philip 
Spahr, who died near Wheeling, \V. Va., at the extreme old age 
of 105 years. His son, John, was born about 1774, at Short Creek, 
near Wheeling, W. Va. He came West, to Abington township, 
Wayne county, in 1809, and in 1814 entered a tract of land, as did 
his companions on this trip — Philip Doddridge, David Jenkins, and 
John Doddridge (see the Doddridge sketches on other pages). 
John Spahr immediately set about clearing and improving his prop- 
erty in tlie wilderness and continued to live on the land he entered 
until his death, in 1833. lie was twice married, the first union 
being to Sebra Doddridge, by whom he had four children (see 
sketch of Doddridge family). His second marriage was to Mar- 
garet Spievy Russell, who survived him and reared their two 
children — Nancy and Joseph D. Nancy became the wife of Isaac 
Jenkins, of Centerville, and both are deceased. Joseph D. Spahr, 
"father of Isaac J., was born in Abington township, Wayne county, 
May 26, 1831. His educational advantages were those afforded by 
the early pioneer schools and he grew to manhood under the guid- 
ing hand of a noble mother. At the age of twenty-one years he 
took the management of the homestead, which he eventually 
owned and conducted until his death, lie made many improve- 
ments and no farm was kept in a better state of cultivation. His 
generosity was widely known and his life was one of exemplary 
traits from beginning to end. He came of a pioneer family of sturdy 
German ancestry and his relatives were prominent in the develop- 
ment, organization, and maintenance of the county, and were al- 
ways ready to indorse and support any movement toward the up- 
building of their community. Speaking of them, in 1808, the Rev. 
Jacob Young says, in his autobiography : "The Spahr family were 
very numerous and very respectable. They were blessed with 
plenty of this world's goods, and it appeared to be their joy to 
support the church." The Spahrs were prominent in aiding to 
build the Doddridge Chapel, in which the Methodists have wor- 
shipped many years. Joseph D. Spahr was always a consistent and 
ardent worker in the church, lie was united in marriage, in 1853, 
to Miss Matilda Burgess, daughter of Richard and Susan Burgess, 
who originally came from Madison count)-, Virginia. Richard Bur- 
gess died about i860 and his good wife passed away in 1898, at the 
home of Joseph D. Spahr, having reached the advanced age of 
ninety-four years. Joseph D. Sphar died in 1903, his wife having 
preceded him, in March, 1881. To this worth)' couple were born 
three sons and four daughters, more specific mention of whom 
follows: Mary, the eldest daughter, is the wife of Mordecai D. 
Doddridge (see sketch ) ; Isaac J. i^> the next in order of birth ; John 
R. is a farmer in Abington township; Mattie G. is the wife of 
Henry Peirce and resides at the old homestead; Nancy Alice also 
resides at the old homestead; Joseph Henry is a farmer and re- 
sides in Henry county; and Florence resides at the old home. 
Isaac J. Spahr received his preliminary education in the public 



BIOGRAPHICAL 469 

schools of Abington and Washington townships and for a short 
time attended the university at Greencastle ; and he has followed 
the occupation of farming all of his life. He worked for his father 
until twenty-one years old and then operated the farm on shares 
a few years. His father then gave him an interest in a small farm 
in Abington township, and this place he afterward purchased and 
continued to operate until 1888, when he sold it and rented the 
farm where he resides. He afterward purchased this place, which 
consists of 180 acres, and has since continued to manage it with 
pronounced success. In his political relations he is a staunch Pro- 
hibitionist, but has never aspired to office, and his religious faith 
is expressed by membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
On Feb. 14, 1888, Mr. Spahr was united in marriage to Miss Lorella 
T. Kramer, born in Wayne county, July 14, 1867, daughter of An- 
drew and Susan (Sweet) Kramer (see sketch). To Mr. and Mrs. 
Spahr came the following children to bless their union : Marcia, 
born May 11, 1889, for three years attended Earlham College and 
was married June 14, 191 1, to Clement P>. Oskins, of Chrisney, Ind., 
and they reside in Greenville, Ohio; Walter, born June 27, [891, is 
at home and is attending the same institution of learning; and 
Edith, born May 12, 1894, is at home, attending the high school at 
Centerville, Ind. 

Henry Stauffer, deceased, one time resident and respected citi- 
zen of Abington township, was born in Germantown, Ohio, near 
Dayton, June 24, 1830. His parents — Jacob and Hannah (lime) 
Stauffer — were natives of Pennsylvania, the lather born March 24, 
1798, and the mother, Feb. 11, 1797. Their married life was spent 
in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana, and in the last named State 
they died and were buried. Soon after their marriage they re- 
moved to Ohio and later came to Indiana, but sonic years after- 
ward returned to Ohio. In 1843 tne )' again came to Indiana and 
settled in Abington township, on the farm where the widow of their 
son Henry resides. The Stauffers originally came from Switzer- 
land, in 1710, and settled on a farm in Berks county, Pennsylvania, 
where the old homestead is still in the possession of one of the 
Stauffer name. The original immigrant was Nans Stauffer, 
and he came to America with three sons, from whom the 
American Stauffers are descended. Jacob Stauffer, the father 
of Henry, died Oct. 16, 1872, and the mother passed away May 13, 
1889, both being buried at Abington. Of their union were born 
ten children : Sarah is deceased, Joseph is a farmer and resides 
near Des Moines, Iowa; Henry was the next in order of birth; John 
is deceased; Elizabeth is the widow of Robert Sealock and resides 
in Texas; Mary is deceased; Hannah is the widow of Burl Sealock 
and resides in Center township, west of Centerville; and three chil- 
dren died in infancy. The lives of the parents had been spent in an 
agricultural way and on their farm their son worked during his 
boyhood. In the local schools of the Abington township home the 
son was educated and earl)- left the parental roof and began his 
real work in life as an apprentice to the blacksmith trade. Later 
he conducted a blacksmith shop cm the farm and was thus engaged 



470 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

until about twenty-three years old, when he took charge of his 
father's farm. Afterward he went to Northern Indiana and resided 
a time, after which he returned and again took charge of the old 
homestead. After the death of his mother he purchased the inter- 
est of the other heirs and continued to reside there until his death, 
with the exception of the year 1897, when he and his wife went on 
an extended \isit to Airs. Stauffer's father. Returning in 1898, they 
resided in Richmond during the following winter and then returned 
to the place which is the homestead of Mrs. Stauffer. Mr. Stauffer 
died Jan. 14, 1907, and is buried at Earlham Cemetery, llis success 
in life was the result of his efforts and that of his good wife. Po- 
litically he was a stalwart in the ranks of the Democratic party, but 
never was an aspirant for public office. On Oct. 10, 1883, occurred 
his marriage to Miss Maggie I laker, daughter of Marcus A. and 
Harriet (Wilson) Paker. Mrs. Stauffer was bom at Dublin, Wayne 
county, Jan. 8, 1864. Her parents were natives respectively of Ohio 
and Maryland, the father born in Dayton, Ohio, Aug. 11, 1837, and 
the mother near Taneytown, Md., in August, 1836. The father 
was a shoemaker in early life, as was his father. His parents were 
natives of Pennsylvania. They came to Ohio from that State very 
early and later came to Indiana, locating at Dublin. Some years 
later the family went West, in the early '80s, and the parents died 
in Kansas. Mrs. Stauffer's parents removed to Missouri, later to 
Texas, and then returned to Missouri, where the mother died. The 
father then returned to Indiana for a short time, but later went 
back to Missouri, leaving the children with his wife's people. Later 
he removed farther west, married again, and is living retired in 
Independence, Ore. Five children were born to the parents of Mrs. 
Stauffer: Thomas Howard, who died in 1901, was a resident of 
Oregon; Mrs. Stauffer is the second in order of birth; Winona is 
the wife of Robert H. Elliott, engaged in the grocery business at 
Carthage, Mo.; Henry N. served three years as a soldier in the 
Philippines, first as a member of the Seventeenth United States 
infantry and later transferred to Company H of the Sixth infantry, 
and is now a farmer and resides near Newberg, Ore.; and Jennie is 
the wife of C. L. Jones, a farmer near New Paris, Ohio. The 
father of Mrs. Stauffer served as a soldier in the Civil war, in the 
Sixty-ninth Indiana infantry, until discharged because of illness. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Stauffer two children were born: Edna Cecile, 
born Aug. 25, 1884, is a student at Earlham College, and Roy 11., 
born Jan. 11, 1886, resides with his mother and operates the farm 
of 120 acres. 

Raleigh W. Burris, for a number of years a prominent and 
highly respected farmer of Center township, is a native of the 
Hoosier State, born in Washington township, Wayne county, Nov. 
18, 1872, son of William and Nancy (Gentry) Burris. The father, 
a native of Wayne county, first beheld the light of day in Center 
township, in 1838. He has always followed agricultural pursuits 
and resides on a farm of eighty acres in Washington township. 
The mother of the subject of this review is a native of Genter 
township, born in 1840. Of this union there are six children: 



BIOGRAPHICAL 4/1 

Isaac is a farmer and resides in Center township ; Martha resides 
at the parental home; Thomas is a resident of Portland, Ore.; 
Emma resides with her parents ; Raleigh W. is the next in order 
of birth ; and Omar is a farmer and resides near Portland Ore. 
Raleigh W. Burris received his educational training in the district 
schools of Washington township, and learned the occupation of 
farming on his parents' place, which calling he lias continued to 
follow. At the age of sixteen years he began working as a hired 
man and continued so employed until married. In 1898 he pur* 
chased the farm where he resides, and which consists of ninety- 
six acres. Politically he is a member of the Democratic party, 
though he has never taken a very active part in the game of poli- 
tics and has not entertained aspirations for public office. On Dec. 
30, 1896, Mr. Burris was united in holy matrimony to Delia Mer- 
ritt, born in Center township, March 14, 1875, and this marital 
union has been blessed by the birth of four children, of whom the 
first died in infancy; John Howard was born Aug. 13, 1902; Wil- 
liam Russell, July 3, 1905, and Paul Everett, Oct. 24, [906. 

John Benjamin Peirce is engaged in general farming in the 
township of Abington, where he is well known and enjoys unmis- 
takable popularity, lie was born in Washington township, this 
county, Nov. 7, 1846, a son of Benjamin and Lucina (Jenkins) 
Peirce, the former born in Massachusetts, March 2d, 1812, and the 
latter in Washington township, this count}-, Sept. 12, 1822. In 
early life the father was a farmer in the State of New York, and 
later engaged in the lumber business and also in contracting for 
canal work. He came to Indiana about 1836 and located one mile 
north of Connersville, having previously had contracts on the 
Whitewater canal, lie purchased a farm near Connersville and 
engaged in agricultural pursuits there five or six years. He came 
to Wayne county in the spring of 184O, became the owner of a 
valuable farm, and the residue of his active career was devoted to 
agricultural pursuits, in which he was duly successful. He died in 
Washington township, March 12, 1898, his wife having passed away 
Oct. 19, 1886. The father was a very methodical man ami kept a 
journal all of his life. He made the trip across the mountains, 
from Richmond, Ya., to Pittsburg, Pa., by wagon, bringing his 
parents with him, and his father died on the way. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Peirce were born ten children: The first were twins 
and died in infancy; David J., born Aug. 6, 1845, died in October 
of the same year; John B. is the next in order of birth; Isaac H., 
born June 28, 1849, is a farmer and resides in Abington township; 
Nancy M., born Nov. 20, 1851, died Dec. 10, 1863; Ella S., born 
Feb. 4, 1854, resides at the old homestead; Philip II., born Nov. 25, 
1856, conducts a complete music store at Lawrence, Kan. ; Jane E., 
born June 1, 1858, died Dec. 18, 1863; and Charles J., born Aug. 6, 
1862, died Feb. 3, 1878. The last named was a remarkable boy in 
his mental equipment and made phenomenal progress in his studies. 
John B. Peirce is indebted to the public schools of Washington 
township for his early educational training, which included a course 
in what was then called the "Collegiate Institute," and after arriv- 



47- MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ing at maturity worked for his father and also followed school 
teaching about eighteen years, in Washington and Abington town- 
ships and in Union and Fayette counties. In 1873 ne settled on the 
farm where he now resides, and to which he has added until his 
landed possessions amount to a fraction over 220 acres, and he has 
since given his attention to agricultural pursuits in a substantial 
and profitable way. In politics Mr. Peirce holds tenaciously to the 
faith of which the Republican party is exponent. On Sept. 21, 
1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Phebe Helms, born in Ab- 
ington township, Aug. 15, 1852, daughter of Isaiah and Jane (Rus- 
sell) Helms, honored citizens of Wayne county, in which they 
were born. Mr. and Mrs. Peirce have a son, Rollo J., born Sept. 
4, 1872. He attended public school in Abington township and 
later entered the Indiana State Normal School, where he graduated 
in 1895. Two years later he received his A. B. degree from Indi- 
ana University, graduating in the class of 1897. lie taught Biology 
and German in the high school at Martinsville, Ind., two years, and 
at Logansport three years, after his graduation from the Univer- 
sity, and then entered the Medical College of Indiana, in 1902, in 
which he graduated in 1905. In the same year he opened an office 
in Richmond, Ind., and began to practice medicine. In the fall of 
1910 Dr. Peirce made the race for count)' coroner and was elected, 
lie is now serving his first term in that office. On Sept. 6, 1893, ne 
was married to Rosa A. Henwood, daughter of John S. Ilenwood, 
of Abington township. To them were born two daughters — Fran- 
ces and Clara — and one son, Herbert. 

Daniel O. Dilling, for many years a leading farmer of Jeffer- 
son, is a native of Wayne county, Indiana, having first beheld the 
light of das - on what is now known as the Kikenberry farm, south- 
west of Ifagerstown, in Jefferson township, May 21, 1803. His 
father, Henry Dilling, was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
May 27, 1831, one of a family of twelve children, all deceased: 
George was a farmer and miller in Indiana and afterwards moved 
to Illinois, and his son, George, is mayor of Seattle, Wash.; Jacob 
married Flizabeth Schmick and was a farmer at Huntington, Ind.; 
Susanna married Lewi S. Sprinkle, a farmer of Huntington, Ind.; 
Christina became the second wife of Levi S. Sprinkle; Catherine 
married Moses Schmuck, a farmer in Wayne and Henry counties; 
Henry was the sixth in order of birth; Frederick married Sarah 
Schuck and was a farmer in Wayne count)' ; Anna married Gabriel 
Hardman, a farmer in Wayne county; David married a Miss 
Bishop, was a soldier in the Civil war and followed grist milling 
in Wayne county; John died in early manhood; Daniel married 
Sally Bowers and was a druggist at Hagerstown ; and William 
married Mary Stover and died in Wayne county. Casper Dilling, 
great-grandfather of Daniel O., came from the province of Hesse, 
Germany, among the Hessian troops sent to America by King 
George, in 1781 or 1782, for service in the Revolutionary war. He 
never saw any active service, however, and at the close of the war, 
in 1783, settled at Morrison's Cove, Pa., where he married and en- 
gaged in farming. The paternal grandfather, Jacob Dilling, came 



BIOGRAPHICAL 473 

to Wayne county in 1833 ar >d purchased 160 acres of land. He 
made frequent trips to Cincinnati, hauling his grain and mill prod- 
ucts to market by wagon. Later he added to his original tract until 
he owned about 1,600 acres in various counties. He was a Re- 
publican in his political views and his religious faith was expressed 
by membership in the Church of the Brethren. Henry Dilling 
came with his parents to Wayne county, Indiana, from his home in 
the Keystone State, in 1833, when but two years of age. As be- 
fore stated, his father purchased 160 acres of land in this county, 
a portion of which he immediately proceeded to clear and transform 
into a tillable condition. That farm is the one now owned by Levi 
S. Dilling and D. O. Dilling. Henry Dilling was a hard working, 
thrifty and enterprising farmer during most of his days and was a 
resident of Wayne county upwards of sixty-five years. In early 
life, in connection with his father, he gave his attention to the 
management of a linseed oil mill and engaged in the manufacture 
of oil, and also for a time conducted a saw mill. At the age of 
twenty-two he settled down to farming on what is now known as 
the Eikenberry farm, north of the old homestead, which tract he 
had purchased of his father and which consisted of 150 acres, and 
there continued to live the remainder of his life. In politics he 
was ever a loyal adherent of the Republican party, though never a 
seeker of public office, and his religious affiliations were with the 
Church of the Brethren, lie passed away Jan. 24, 1900, at the age 
of sixty-nine. His wife, the mother of Daniel O. Dilling — Anna 
(Shuck) Dilling — was born Oct. 2$, 1833, and was married to 
Henry Dilling in 1853. She died March 22, 1911, at Hagerstown. 
To her and her beloved husband were born five children: Levi S., 
born Feb. 15, 1854, is farming part of the old homestead, married 
Ellen Widows, who is deceased, and they became the parents of 
three children — Ivan \\\, born Aug. 28, 1888, May Anna, born May 
2, [891, and Bertha R., born Feb. 2, 1895; Margaret D.. bom Feb. 
11, 1857, is the wife of Llwood Lawson, a shoe dealer in New 
Castle, Ind.; the third child died in infancy; Daniel O. is the fourth 
in order of birth ; and Ida D., born March 31, 1867, is the widow of 
Charles Lawson and resides in Wayne count)'. The mother of 
these children was a member of the Church of the Brethren, her 
husband having served on many important committees of that or- 
ganization at different times. She was a daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Miller) Schuck, the former of whom (lied in 1899, at the 
age of ninety-one. He was twice married, his second wife being 
Lovina Swafford, of Henry county, who died in April, 191 1, at the 
age of ninety-one years. Of the first niarriage were four children : 
Anna married Henry Dilling; Sarah first married Frederick Dill- 
ing and after his death Gabriel Hardman, becoming the mother of 
'two children — Dora A (deceased), and Anna M. ; Christina is the 
widow of Thomas Bailey and the mother of six children — William 
H., Ada (deceased), James, Sarah (deceased), Pearl, and Angie; 
Catherine is the wife of Henry Huntsinger, a farmer in Kansas, and 
to them have been born six children — Elizabeth (deceased), Mah- 
lon, George, William Daniel, Emma, and Katharine Of the sec- 



474 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ond marriage were born six children: Jacob served as a soldier 
in the Civil war and is living in Henry county; Jeremiah served as 
a soldier in the Civil war, married Louisa Walker, and is living in 
the State of Washington; Mary is the wife of Isaiah Hoover, a 
farmer in Henry county; Laban resides on a farm in Henry county, 
as also does Harrison; and Cassius is engaged in the mercantile 
business at New Lisbon, Henry county. Levi S. Billing, the eld- 
est son of Henry Dilling, is an elder in the Nettle Creek organiza- 
tion of the Church of the Brethren, and Margaret D., the eldest 
daughter, graduated in the State Normal School at Terre Haute 
and taught several years, holding a State license for life. Daniel 
O. Dilling was reared in his native township and received his edu- 
cational training in the district schools there. Upon leaving school 
he took to farming and for a time lived on a farm which he rented 
from his father. Jn j8S6 he purchased forty acres of his present 
place, to which he added until he owns 210 acres, ami upon his 
original purchase he has continued to reside. In politics he has 
always been active in Republican circles, though, like his father be- 
fore him, never fostered aspirations for public office. On Aug. 6. 
1885, Mr. Dilling was married to Elizabeth Holder, daughter of 
David and Christina (Ulrich) Holder, of Jefferson township, and 
of this union there is a daughter, Olive 11., born Sept. 15, 1902. 
Mrs. Dilling was born Jan. 15, 1866, one of two daughters born to 
her parents, the sister being Catherine, born Dec. 1, 1863, wife of 
William N. Stout, and they have a son, Clarence, born Jan. 4, igoo 
Mr. Dilling is a director in the Citizens' State Bank, at Hagerstown, 
and is also interested in the German Baptist Tri-County Mutual 
Protective Association, of which he has been secretary and treas 
urer since it was organized, Oct. 24, 1895. It carries over $8,000,- 
000 of insurance. lie is also a director in the Indiana Mutual Cy- 
clone Insurance Company of the State of Indiana. 

George R. Ulrich, for several years one of the leading farmers 
of Jefferson, first beheld the light of day in Marshall county, Indi- 
ana, Oct. 17, 1868. His father, Martin T. Ulrich, a native of the 
Keystone State, born June 2~j, 1838, migrated westward to Wayne 
county as a child in company with his parents, who settled on what 
is known as the "Tidewater Farm," of 160 acres, in the township 
of Jefferson. Martin T. Ulrich was born in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, son of John and Catherine (Teeter) Ulrich. His grand- 
father, John Ulrich, brought his wife and family west, about 1818, 
and entered several tracts of government land in Wayne count)', 
one of the tracts being what is known as the "Tidewater Farm," 
lying west of and near Hagerstown. His son, John, the father of 
Martin T. and grandfather of George R., received this farm from 
his father. He was also a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
born about 1795, and his wife was born about 1805. He was a 
Democrat in his political views and his religious faith was ex- 
pressed by membership in the Church of the Brethren. To him and 
his good wife were born eleven children — Daniel, Hannah, John, 
Christian, Elizabeth, Barbara, Mary, Jacob, Martha, George, .and 
Martin T., all deceased but George and Martin T. George is a 



BIOGRAPHICAL 475 

farmer in Henry county, near Petersburg. He is married to Cath- 
erine E. McSherley and they have two children: Amanda A., who 
is deceased, married Alfred Waltz, and they had one child, Lena 
A., who is married to Edward O. Beeson (see sketch) ; and Allie 
A., who is married to Oscar A. Brown (see sketch). Martin T. 
Ulrich was educated in the district schools and has always fol- 
lowed farming-. In 1867 he removed to Marshall county, Indiana, 
where he purchased 103 acres, to which he later added forty acres, 
and resided there seven years. lie then traded this farm for seven- 
ty-six acres in Henry county and lived there two years, after which 
he sold that farm and purchased the place where he resides, in the 
northern part of Jefferson township. The farm originally com- 
prised 100 acres, but, in 1896, he sold sixty acres, thus reducing his 
farm to forty acres, which he continues to operate. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and a member of the Church of the Brethren, lie 
was married March 29, i860, to Anna Main, daughter of William 
and Martha (McMullen) Main, who resided in Henry county, near 
Petersburg. Mrs. Ulrich is one of fourteen children born of these 
parents, and she and a brother and a sister are the only ones sur- 
viving. The sister is Catherine, wife of Henry Holder, a retired 
farmer of Randolph county, and the brother is Aaron Main, a farmer 
in Madison county. The deceased brothers and sisters are: Mary- 
Jane, Nancy, Rachel, Emily, Margaret, Nelson, Martha, Otho, Al- 
fred, Luciuda, and Elizabeth. William Main settled in Henry 
county in an early day, coming from the State of New York, where 
his wife also was born, but they were married in Indiana. He 
was a Democrat in politics and a member of the Church of the 
Brethren. He died at the age of eighty-seven and his wife passed 
away at the age of eighty-five. To Martin T. ami Anna (Main) 
Ulrich were born three children: Harvey, born Oct. 26, 1863, mar- 
ried a daughter of Benjamin Jewett, of Hagerstown, and they have 
two children — Ruth, who is the wife of Perry Holliday, and Robert; 
Ceorge R. is the second in order of birth; and Charles, born Jan. 
27, 1875, was married, Aug. 16, 1895, to Amy R. Austin, daughter 
of Garrison and Alice (Paddock) Austin, of Cambridge City, and 
they have three children — Vernelia, born June 8, 1896, Garrison 
Martin, born March 25, 1902, ami Elbert Austin, born July 13, 1903. 
Harvey is a blacksmith in Hagerstown and Charles is a farmer in 
Jefferson township. George R. Ulrich received his education in 
the schools of District No. 4, in Jefferson township, and when not 
occupied with his studies was busily engaged in assisting his par- 
ents about the farm. Consequently at an early age he learned the 
arduous lesson of hard work and acquired an intimate knowledge 
of farming, which occupation he has continued to pursue with suc- 
cess and profit, lie remained with his father until maturity, and 
also worked at the carpenter trade for a time. He then worked at 
fence building from 1887 to 1893, after which he operated Dr. 
Uines' farm in Dalton township one year, and from 1895 to 1903 
logged for the saw mills in Hagerstown. In 1903 he settled on his 
present farm of lifty-eight acres in the northern part of Jefferson 
township, where he is engaged in general farming. He also farms 



47^ MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

thirty acres, which he rents near by, and does some dairying. Po- 
litically he is actively affiliated with the Democratic party. In 
1888, Mr. Ulrich was united in holy wedlock to Ella Pedro, daugh- 
ter of Charles and Victoria Ann (Mills) Pedro, of whom the latte- 
is deceased and the former is the present assessor oi Jefferson 
township. Mrs. Ulrich is one of six children born to her parents, 
the others being Edward, George Delia, Frank, and Oscar. Seven 
children have blessed the happy marital union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ulrich: Eva, born Jan. 12, 1889, is the wife of Thomas Lamar; 
Nevada, born Sept. 26, 1891 ; Mabel, born Jan. 31, 1898; Hazel, born 
June 14, 1900; Jessie, born Jan. 6, 1903; Harry, born June 26, 1905; 
and Walter E., born June 10, 1908. 

Eli Monroe Wisehart, an honored citizen of Wayne county, 
now living practically retired, is a scion of stanch American ances- 
try and a native of the great Iloosier State, which has given to 
America such a valuable element of citizenship, lie was born in 
Liberty township, Henry count)', Indiana, April 13, 1846, a son 
of John L. and Margaret (Davidson) Wisehart, the former born 
in Henry county, Nov. 9, 1814, and the latter in Mason county, 
Kentucky, Dec. 18, 1818. The paternal grandfather was benja- 
min Wisehart, a farmer in Henry county, and the maternal grand- 
parents removed from Kentucky to Henry county, Sept. 14, 1826. 
John L. Wisehart, the father, was educated in the district schools 
of Henry county and eventually located in Liberty township, where 
he became a prominent citizen and served two terms as township 
trustee, and there he passed the remainder of his life, which was 
one of signal usefulness and honor. He espoused the cause of the 
Republican party, of whose principles he continued a stanch advo- 
cate from the time of the birth of that organization, lie and his 
wife were members of the New Light Church in Henry count). He 
was summoned to the life eternal, March 25, 1S04, and his widow 
survived until Sept. 21, 1903. Of their union were born twelve 
children: Benjamin Franklin, born Nov. 28, 1837, died Dec. 4, 
1902; Samuel Davidson, born Oct. 18, 1839, became a grain dealer 
at Millville and died in 1910; Amerika, born in 1844, married Boon 
Kngels and died in 1883; Eli M. is the next in order of birth; Wil- 
son Albert, born May 22, 1848, was married to Lorena Atchinsoii, 
Aug. 15, 1869; Alonzo, born July 1, 1852, was a school teacher and 
died March 3, 1897; Lagrande, born Sept. 29, 1858, was a merchant 
and died Jan. 4, 1906; Viretta, born in 1854, married Eli Walrath 
and resides near Muncie, in Delaware county; Maria Catherine, 
born Aug. 8, 1850, is the widow of John Hart and resides with her 
son at Galveston, Ind. ; Ella, born June 30, 1856, married Charles 
Stafford, Dec. 24, 1875, and resides near Muncie, in Delaware coun- 
ty ; Mary E. is the next in order of birth; and John Wesley, born in 
i860, married Nellie Craven, in 1892, and is a general agent for the 
International Plarvester Company, with headquarters at Fort 
Wayne, Ind. Eli M. Wisehart passed his boyhood and early youth 
on the old homestead farm in Henry county, Indiana, where his 
early educational discipline was secured in the common schools. 
At the age of seventeen he began clerking in the drygoods store of 



BIOGKAI'HH Al, Y/'/ 

his brother, Benjamin F. Wisehart, at New Castle, and remained 
thus employed a period of two years. He was then employed one 
year by his brother, Samuel D. Wisehart, and his brother-in-law, 
Boon Ingels, at Milton, Wayne county, in a drygoods store which 
they conducted at that place. In 1866, Eli M. Wisehart returned 
to Henry county and assisted in operating his mother's farm until 
1869, when he moved to his own farm, adjoining his mother's place, 
and resided there one year, having purchased eighty acres of the 
other heirs of his father's estate, in Liberty township, Henry 
county. In 1870 he sold this place and moved to the farm of Lewis 
Kinsey, in Liberty township, where he worked by the month from 
March 1, 1870, until Aug. 1, of the same year, lie then moved to 
the farm of Lewis Kinsey, in Jefferson township, Wayne county, 
and this farm he rented from August, 1870, until March 1, 1872, 
at which time he rented a farm of 278 acres in Henry county, near 
Middletown, and remained there one year. In 1873 he rented a 
farm of 150 acres, which he now owns, situated near his old home 
in Liberty township, and resided there five years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he purchased 100 acres of the tract, and about 
1890 purchased the remaining fifty acres. In 1894 he purchased 
forty-two acres of the Bailey farm, and about five years later pur- 
chased eighty-three acres additional of the same tract, thus giving 
him a total of 275 acres of land. He resided on the farm of 150 
acres from 1874 until 1899, a period of twenty-six years, and on 
Sept. 5 of the last named year removed from Henry county to 
Wayne count}', for the purpose of caring for his wife's father, 
Lewis Kinsey, in his declining years. Mr. and Mrs. Wisehart own 
the farm of 203 acres, formerly belonging to Mr. Kinsey, situated in 
Jefferson township, near Uagerstown; and though practically re- 
tired, Mr. Wisehart gives his attention principally to the manage- 
ment of that farm, which is devoted to diversified agriculture and 
to the raising of high-grade live stock. He has made excellent im- 
provements on his fine homestead and the same is one of the valu- 
able and attractive farms of this favored section of the lloosier 
commonwealth. A stanch adherent of the Republican party, Mr. 
Wisehart has given an intelligent and active support to its cause, 
in which he has rendered effective service. He and his wife are 
zealous members of the Church of the Brethren. On Aug. 7, 1868, 
Mr. Wisehart was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Jane Kinsey, 
a daughter of Lewis and Catherine (Shult'z) Kinsey, and of this 
union were born twelve children: Martin Chester, born Nov. 24, 
1869, who is a mail clerk on the Pennsylvania railroad between 
Cincinnati and Chicago, was married Dec. 24, 1893, to Jennie Robin- 
son, who died April 13, 1005, leaving two daughters — Ada Flor- 
ence, born Oct. 19, 1894, and Martha Sarah, born Feb. 10, 1905 — 
and after the death of his first wife Martin C. married Maude Poin- 
dexler, of Anderson, Ind. ; Ida Florence, born Jan. 29, 1871, died 
April 9, 1897; Catherine Estella, born Oct. 10, 1873, was married 
to llarley B. Messick, of Richmond, Nov. 30, 1892, and they have 
two children — Howard Churchill, born Feb. 24, 1805, and Eugene 
Wisehart, born Feb. 22, 1903; Lewis Monroe, born \pril 19, 1875, 



4/8 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

died Aug. 5, 1881 ; David Wesley, born Dec. 6, 1877, who is a 
farmer in Henry county, married Marie Moore, July 22, 1902, and 
they have three children — Goldie Olive, burn Nov. 19, 1903, Ruth 
Marie, born April 21, 1905, and JosieJVIay, born Feb. 7, 1909; Olive 
Carrie, born Jan. 4, 1880, was married, March 17, 1896, to Perry R. 
Hill, a meat inspector at Fort Worth, Tex., and they have a son, 
Robert Guy, born March 29, 1898; Goldie Frances, born Dec. 22, 
1881, was married, June 20, 1906, to George F. Darter, a dentist of 
Elkhart, Ind. ; the next in order of birth was an infant that died 
unnamed; Edna Margaret, born March 29, 1884, is the wife of Dr. 
Charles B. Darter (see sketch); Luther Churchill, born Jan. 17, 
1887, was married, March 24, 1906, to Josie Hoover; Charles Eli, 
born March I, 1889, died April 18, 1896; and Anna Clair, born 
Aug. 5, 1892, died April 6, 1896. The little granddaughter, Martha 
Sarah Wisehart, daughter of Martin C, resides with Mr. and Mrs. 
Wisehart. Aside from his farming interests, Mr. Wisehart is a 
director of the First National Bank of Hagerstown. 

Frank Vinton Thornburgh, whose advanced ideas on matters 
pertaining to agriculture are giving him a prominence among peo- 
ple interested in that branch of industry, is a native of this county, 
born in Dalton township, Dec. 31, 1871, son of Dempsey Carver and 
Ethelinda (Williams) Thornburgh (see sketch of Dempsey C. 
Thornburgh). Our subject attended the district schools of Dalton 
township and afterward completed his education at the high school 
of Hagerstown. While attending school his spare time was devoted 
to work on the home farm and this was his abode till the death of 
his parents. His life's work has been along the line of farming and 
his theories in this important branch of industry are given practical 
demonstration and are bearing out excellent results. His work is 
carried on in a scientific manner. He worked on the old home- 
stead with his brothers, assisting in managing the same until the 
death cf his mother, when he took possession of 135 acres, to which 
he has since added forty acres, adjoining, in Randolph county. Po- 
litical!)', Mr. Thornburgh is a Republican and lie is a member of 
the Friends' church. Fraternally, he has membership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 150, at Economy; the Encamp- 
ment of the same order at Losantville, and of the Masonic lodge at 
Hagerstown. On Dec. 30, 1906, he was married to Miss Essie May 
Strode, daughter of Thomas J. and Malinda (Routh) Strode, of 
Fort Scott, Kan. Mrs. Thornburgh was born Dec. 31, 1S76. 

John M. Replogle, for years an active follower of agricultural 
pursuits in Wayne county, with residence in Jefferson township, 
is a native of the Hoosier State, born on the farm now owned by 
Mrs. David Krull, north of Hagerstown, Feb. 24, 1869. His father, 
Joel Replogle, a native of Wayne count)', born on a farm near 
Hagerstown, was a farmer by occupation, residing upon a farm in 
Jefferson township until his death, in 1899, at the age of sixty-four 
years, he having been born Dec. 4, 1835. Politically lu; was a Re- 
publican many years, but later in life was a Prohibitionist. The 
mother of John M. Replogle — Aurelia (McLucas) Replogle— was 
a native of the Hoosier State, born north of Hagerstown, daughter 



biographical 479 

of John McLucas, who came from Scotland to Wayne county. The 
paternal grandfather was Joseph Replogle, who came from Penn- 
sylvania. Two children were horn to Joel Replogle and wife: 
Christina, wife of Moses Keever, a farmer in Jefferson township, 
and John M. The subject of this record received his schooling in 
the district schools of Jefferson township and has always followed 
farming as an occupation, with the exception of eleven years, which 
he spent at the blacksmith trade with William Wedekind, of Ila- 
gerstown. The past two years he has served as township super- 
visor, in which position his sound judgment and executive ability 
have been utilized for the welfare of the community. In politics 
he is a member of the Republican party and in fraternal circles 
ranks high, being a member of the Subordinate Lodge and the En- 
campment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Hagers- 
town. On Jan. 22, 188S, he was united in holy matrimony to Miss 
Rebecca Almira Pipher, daughter of Philip and Sarah (Stamm) 
Pipher, of Jefferson township. Philip Pipher was a native of the 
State of Ohio, born near Springfield, Aug. I, 1835, son oi Philip and 
Catherine Elizabeth (Getz) Pipher, who in an early day removed 
to Wayne county and settled in Hagerstown, where they resided 
some years. The)' then moved to a farm east of Hagerstown and 
later to a farm north of town, and Philip, Sr., and his wife both 
died on what is now the Mahlon Leonard farm. The grandfather 
was a Democrat, and they came from Pennsylvania to Springfield, 
Ohio. Philip Pipher, jr., father of Mrs. Replogle, received his edu- 
cation in the district schools and eventually purchased twenty-four 
acres of his father's farm, east of Hagerstown, and later added thir- 
ty-six acres to it from the Daniel Petty estate. In the fall of 1902 
he sold the' place and purchased a residence at the north edge of 
Hagerstown. In 1903 he purchased forty acres of John Smith, east 
of Hagerstown, the tract being now part of Martha Runners farm. 
In 1904 he sold this tract and purchased the sixty-six acres which 
is occupied by his widow and the family of his son-in-law, Mr. 
Replogle, upon which he continued to reside to the time of his de- 
mise. He was always an enthusiastic member of the Democratic 
party and he and his wife belonged to the Lutheran church. On 
Jan. 13, 18O0, he was married to Sarah Stamm, daughter of John 
and Rebecca Stamm, who came from Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Hagerstown, in 1853. Sarah Stamm was born Jan. 26, 
1840. She is the mother of two children, of which Mrs. Replogle 
is the younger, the other'being Anna Mary, born Feb. 28, 1863, the 
wife of Henry Swinn, of Jackson township, and of this union there 
is a son, Harvey, born Oct. 22, 1891. Mrs. Replogle was born 
Sept. 14, 1867, and of her union with Mr. Replogle there is a daugh- 
ter, Golden, born Oct. 12, 1888. She resides at the parental home. 
Harry Carver Thornburgh, one of the leading citizens of Dal- 
ton township, was born at the old homestead, a portion of which 
constitutes his present farm residence, Jan. 6, 1884, the youngest 
son of Dempsey C. Carver and Ethelinda (Williams) Thornburgh 
(see sketch of Dempsey C. Thornburgh). He attended the district 
schools of Dalton township and his life's work has been in the line 



480 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

of agriculture, commendable success having come to him in this 
pursuit. I lis father was careful and painstaking and the lessons 
learned from the sire and the supplementary reading on agricul- 
tural subjects have given to the son a prestige that makes him an 
authority on land tilling. The Thornburgh homestead comprises 
392 acres of fertile land and in point of landscape is one of the most 
attractive in the county. Upon the death of the mother, Sept. 2, 
1908, Harry C. Thornburgh took possession of 127 acres of the old 
homestead and has since resided thereon. The buildings are of 
the most substantial construction and are equipped with the most 
modern conveniences. In politics Mr. Thornburgh is a Republican 
and follows his party on all issues. Socially he is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, his lodge being No. 151, at 
Mooreland, and as often as possible its meetings are attended by 
him. On July 25, 1906, occurred his marriage to Miss Cora Bell 
Wilson, daughter of Anderson and Rosa (McColley") Wilson, of 
near Mooreland, in Henry county. Mrs. Thornburgh was born in 
Boone county, Sept. 19, 1887. Her parents were natives of Indi- 
ana, the father having been born in Boone county, July 13, 1862, 
and the mother in Marion county, June 5, 1861. Of the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thornburgh there is a son, Kenneth Carver Wilson, 
horn May 2S, 1907. 

Dr. James E. Taylor was a native of Ohio, born in Sewells- 
ville, Belmont county, that State, April 5, 1843. His parents — 
Barnett and Letitia S. (McPherson) Taylor — were natives of that 
county, and the father was a carpenter and contractor by occupa- 
tion, having built about all of the churches and schoolhouses in 
Kirkwood township in that county. He also owned a farm of 200 
acres, upon which he lived, and he served as justice of the peace 
twenty-one consecutive years. The father and mother died in 
Belmont county, in the same township in which they were born, 
and of their seven children who grew to maturity, live are living. 
James E. Taylor received his preliminary education in the village 
primary school and later attended the Fairview High School. Hav- 
ing finished the preparatory course he entered college, but soon 
the sounds of civil war called him from the classroom to the camp, 
and on Oct, 15, 1801, he enlisted in the Fifth Ohio cavalry in 
General Wallace's division. This regiment was organized at 
Camp Dennison, from September to November, 1861, to serve three 
years. On Feb. 26, 1862, it received orders to move, and on March 
1 left Camp Dennison for Paducah, Ky.; reporting to Brig.-Gen. 
W. T. Sherman. On the night of March 15 the regiment dropped 
down to Pittsburg Landing and at the battle of Shiloh was con- 
stantly under fire, General Grant giving direct orders to it and 
assigning it various difficult and dangerous duties and positions in 
the field. The behavior of officers and men throughout their initial 
battle was highly commended by both Generals Grant and Sher- 
man. The regiment advanced with the army in the slow '"siege" 
of Corinth and had its share of picket duty and other exposure. 
The first and second battalions brought on the battle of Meta- 
mora, Tenn. — or, as the Confederates call it, "The Hatcrfie"— 




DR. JAMES E. TAYLOR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 481 

where it fought bravely throughout the day, driving the rear guard 
in its retreat and capturing many prisoners. In April, [863, a 
severe battle was fought at Coldwater, Miss., in which the regi- 
ment was engaged. An expedition which Mr. Taylor joined, com- 
posed of 100 men each from the Fifth Ohio, Second Illinois, and 
First Missouri cavalry, was sent out toward Panola, Miss., under 
command of Major Henry, and on June 20, while in bivouac on the 
plantation of Dr. Adkins, twelve miles south of Hernando, was sur- 
rounded in a dense fog by General Chalmers with a force of 2,000 
men, with six field guns. The little band, however, by a gallant 
charge cut through the enemy's lines and escaped, although closely 
pursued ten miles. During the spring of 1864 the regiment effected 
a veteran organization and in the autumn joined Sherman in his 
march to the sea and up through the Carolinas. It was retained in 
service until Oct. 30, 1865, when it was mustered out. Mr. Tay- 
lor rose by meritorious service in turn to the positions of orderly 
sergeant, first lieutenant, captain, acting assistant adjutant-general, 
and assistant adjutant-general on the staff of Gen. Thomas T. 
Heath. Fie enlisted at the age of eighteen years, as a private, and 
was not twenty-one when he received a captain's commission. He 
was in the army more than four years, participating in all the cam- 
paigns of his regiment, and was mustered out at Charlotte, N. C. 
In December, 1865, he entered the Iron City Commercial College, 
at Pittsburgh, Pa., and remained there until" Ma)', 1866. He then 
commenced the study of medicine, to which his tastes had inclined 
from boyhood. Soon afterward he engaged in the drug business 
at Ray City, Mich., continuing his medical studies, and in that city 
began the practice of his profession. In 1869 he attended a course 
of lectures at Miami Medical College, graduating in 1871 in the 
College of Medicine and Surgery in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then 
removed to Richmond, Ind., where he continued in the practice of 
medicine until his death. On Nov. 8, 187 1, he was married to Miss 
Sarah H. Shell, of Fort Plain, N. Y., who died March 10, 1880. He 
was married on Dec. 10, 1881, to Gertrude E. Snell, of St. Johns- 
ville, N. Y., who died March 23, 1891, and of this union was born 
one child, Julia L. Taylor. On Sept. 12, 1901, he was married to 
Martha J. Neal, who survives her husband and resides in Rich- 
mond. Dr. Taylor's fraternal relations were with the Masonic 
order, which he joined in September, 1867, and he attained to the 
Thirty-second degree, being a member of the Richmond Lodge and 
of the Consistory at Indianapolis. He was a Past Eminent Com- 
mander, and from 1873 to 1875 was Captain-General of the Rich- 
mond Commandery, being elected Eminent Commander the fol- 
lowing year. He was a member of Sol Meredith Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, an association that his valorous army rec- 
ord eminently entitled him to, and was also a member of the Loyal 
Legion. One incident of his military career is worthy of mention 
in this article. On the evening of Dec. 31, 1863, which was one of 
the coldest and most bitter nights of the Civil war period, he called 
his men together and asked for a volunteer to cross the river for 
supplies and blankets, but not one responded. Thereupon Captain 



482 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Taylor took it upon himself to perform the task and, securing an 
old Indian canoe, he made seven trips across the river, carrying 
loads that forced the boat down until the top of it was but an inch 
or two above the water, which froze to his hands, and thus he 
faced death on each and every trip. The Doctor was also a mem- 
ber of the Young Men's Business Club, and for thirteen years 
served as president of the Margaret Smith Home for Aged Women. 
Politically he was an adherent of the Republican party and in 18G8 
took an active part in the Republican convention of the Sixth Con- 
gressional district of Michigan, one of the most exciting political 
assemblies ever held in that State. While a member of the village 
council at Portsmouth, Mich., now incorporated with Hay City, he 
was instrumental in saving that town $70,000, by his ingenious 
and able efforts. Some years ago he served one term as coroner of 
Wayne county. 

John Macy. — The first record of the Macy' family in America 
was at Newbury, Mass., in 1639, when Thomas Macy was made a 
freeman. He and his wife, Sarah Hopcott, came originally from 
Chilmark, England, and settled at Newbury, Mass., in 1631. In 
1639 Salisbury, Mass., was founded by them and others. Thomas 
Macy was an extensive planter and merchant and of much im- 
portance in the settlement. He was a Baptist in his religious faith 
and often exhorted the people when the regular pastor was away. 
Many laws were passed designed to prohibit exhorters of all faiths, 
except the Puritan, in Massachusetts, during the years 1656-57, 
and among those thus proscribed was Thomas Macy. Laws were 
also passed requiring all Baptists and members of other denomina- 
tions to attend the Puritan churches, but Thomas Macy and other 
Baptists did not obey and he was eventually fined five shillings for 
each absence. In 1659, with nine others, he purchased Nantucket 
Island, and in the same year was fined thirty shillings by the Gen- 
eral Court for sheltering four Quakers. In the fall of that year, 
with his wife and five children, he removed to Nantucket Island, 
and they were the first white settlers to locate there among the 
friendly Indians. (See Whittier's poem, "The Exiles.") Thomas 
Macy's life there as a fisherman was long ami useful, and he died 
in 1682, at the age of seventy-four years, his wife following him in 
death in 1694, at the age of eighty-four years. ( )f their union were 
born seven children, the sixth in order of birth being John Macy, 
born July 14, 1655, and died Oct. 14, 1691. He married Nantucket 
Deborah Gardner and the eldest of their eight children was John 
Macy, born in 1675 and died in 175 1. He married Judith Worth 
and they joined the Society of Eriends in 1711, being the first of 
the Macys to become Quakers. He was a ship builder by occu- 
pation and he and his wife were the great-great-grandparents of 
Edwin M. Stanton, who served as secretary of war in President 
Lincoln's cabinet. To John and Judith (Worth) Macy were born 
thirteen children and their eighth child was John, bom at Nan- 
tucket, Dec. 11, 1721, and died at New Garden, \ r . C, in 1796. lie 
married Eunice Coleman and in 1761 removed to New Garden, N. 
C. They were the parents of fourteen children, the ninth iii order 



BIOGRAPHICAL 483 

of birth being Berechiah, born at Nantucket, Feb. 24, 1760. He 
married Lucinda Barnard at New Garden, N, C, March 20, 1783, 
and moved to Lost Creek, Term., in 1802. From that place lie re- 
moved to Economy, Ind., and died on a farm near Economy, Aug. 
27, 1832. He and his wife became the parents of eleven children, 
among whom Isaac, father of John, was ninth in order of birth. 
Lucinda Barnard was a native of North Carolina, the eldest of nine 
children born to Benjamin and Eunice (Fitch) Laniard, who had 
removed to the Old North State in 1704. Isaac Macy was a wood 
workman and had a shop on his farm, where he stocked plows and 
made farm wagons complete. With a wood turning-lathe he made 
the hub and spokes for the wheels of the wagons and also a few 
carriages that were in demand in the '40s. He was a good penman 
and was one of the assessors of Wayne county before Dalton town- 
ship was organized, lie did much in the way of writing wills ami 
deeds in his neighborhood. He was an Abolitionist, believing it 
right to aid the slave in gaining his freedom by fleeing to Canada. 
The maternal grandparents of John Macy were Henry and Ann 
(Maulsby) Thornburgh. Ann Maulsby was born, in 1771, in Penn- 
sylvania, and in 1777 moved with her parents to Maryland, later 
to Virginia, and still later to Tennessee. She married Henry 
Thornburgh at Lost Creek, Tenn., and in 1819 they removed to 
Wayne count)', settling on West river, in Dalton township, where 
the}' purchased government land at $1.25 per acre. She was known 
as "Aunt Nancy" and was a gentle and kind Quaker woman, doing 
considerable millinery work in the making of Quaker bonnets. She 
and her husband lived together sixty-eight years, until his death, 
Aug. II, i8f>2, and she afterward removed to Iowa, where she died 
in 1867 at the age of ninety-six years. The husband, Henry Thorn- 
burgh, was born in North Carolina, May 25, 1773, a son of Henry 
and Rachel (Moon) Thornburgh, who were married in 1758 at 
New Garden, N. C. The former was a son of Walter Thornburgh 
and died at Lost Creek, Tenn., in 1789. Eleanor (Thornburgh) 
Macy, mother of John Macy, was fifteen years old when she came 
with her parents from Tennessee to Wayne county, Indiana. She 
often talked to her children about the long trip in wagons and of 
crossing the Ohio river at Cincinnati, then a small town. She 
lived on the same farm sixty-eight years. She and her husband 
were pioneers in the Springfield Monthly Meeting of Friends. She 
was devoted to the education of her family of nine children in all 
that was noble to a true character. The greatest trial of her life 
was during the Civil war, when three of her sons responded to 
their country's call and the youngest, Henry B., a lad of eighteen 
years, was mortally wounded at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., and 
a few weeks later was brought home a corpse. Isaac and Eleanor 
(Thornburgh) Macy were married April 5, 1825, and removed to 
the present farm of their son, John, in 1826, remaining on this land 
the residue of their lives, the father's death occurring Dec. 16, 
1847, an( J the mother's on Feb. 10, 1894. They were the parents of 
nine children: Lydia Ann, born Jan. 4, 1826, first married William 
Good and after his death Edward Starbuck, and she died March 27, 



484 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

1863, the mother of two children by her fust marriage — Lawrence 
P. and Macy — both deceased; Lewis, born Feb. 10, "1828, married 
Eliza Petro and died Sept. 10, 1879, tne hither of two children — 
George J., of Columbus, Ohio, and John S., of Indianapolis, Ind.; 
Elvira, born May 6, 1830, is the widow of Thomas .Marshall and re- 
sides in Economy, the mother of two children — Ellsworth and Ella; 
Jesse VV., born June 7, 1832, resides near Galveston, Tex., is mar- 
ried to Emma Osborri and they have two children — Lulu and Iona ; 
Irena, born March 21, 1836, died Feb. 6, 1861 ; William T., born 
Jan. U), 1839, in the newspaper business at North .Manchester, lnd., 
married Eva Guinther and they have a daughter, Emma ; John is 
the next in order of birth; Sylvanus, born Nov. 18, 1843, a veteran 
of the Civil war in the same regiment with his brother, John, and 
for twenty years connected with the Allen Pinkerton detective 
force, lived with his brother, John, and died there March 27, 1911; 
and Henry !'>., born Feb. 14, 1846, was wounded in the battle of 
Franklin, Term., and died in an army hospital about Feb. 12, 1865. 
John Macy was born on the farm where he now resides, May 8, 
1841. His boyhood days were spent on the farm and at school 
age he spent three winter months each year in the district school. 
His father died in the winter of 1847, leaving the widow ami a 
family of nine children — six sons and three daughters. At the age 
of seventeen years John was encouraged by his older brother, 
Jesse, to attend a graded school at Whitewater, nine miles north 
of Richmond. One of the inducements to country students was 
that they would have an opportunity to cut cord wood on Satur- 
days to pay their tuition. After attending this school a term of 
twelve weeks a similar school was started at Economy by Thomas 
Charles, a late graduate of Horace Mann's college in Ohio. This 
school being nearer home, Mr. Macy spent one term there and was 
then sufficiently qualified, at the age of nineteen, to teach a district 
school. In 1802 he enlisted as a soldier in Company D of the Sixty- 
ninth Indiana infantry for service in the Civil war. In speaking 
of his military career Mr. Macy gave to the writer of this review 
the following statement: "Company D of the Sixty-ninth Indiana 
infantry was composed of men living in the town and neighborhood 
of Economy, Wayne county, and in and around Huntsville, Ran- 
dolph county. They volunteered under the call of 1862, when a 
wave of patriotism swept over the Northern States. Father and 
son, two and three brothers of the same family, offered their serv- 
ices. Fourteen sets of brothers were in this company, and only one 
pair — William and Thomas W. Botkin, of Huntsville, remained to- 
gether and were mustered out at the end of the war, the others 
being separated by death, discharge, or other causes. We were 
mustered into the United States service, 100 strong, Aug. 19, 1862, 
and were attached to the Sixty-ninth regiment of Indiana volun- 
teers. Myself and brother, Sylvanus, were members of this com- 
pany. The regiment was ordered to Indianapolis, immediately 
equipped with arms and clothing, and, without any drill whatever, 
was sent to the front. On Aug. 30, after eleven days' service as 
Yankee soldiers, we met the enemy in deadly array. Kirby Smith, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 485 

with an army of 30,000, was advancing through Kentucky, headed 
toward Cincinnati. We were assigned to General Manson's bri- 
gade. Our forces, all told, amounted to 7,000 and we met the enemy 
in an all-day battle near Richmond, Kv., making three different 
stands during the day, but were overpowered and cut to pieces. Our 
regiment's loss in killed and wounded was twenty per cent, of the 
number engaged in the battle and over two-thirds of the number 
were taken prisoners. We were paroled and allowed to return 
home. We reorganized at Richmond and drilled until we were 
properly exchanged. I now recall my thoughts as a boy of nineteen 
on the farm. The only idea 1 had of the people south of Mason and 
Dixon's line was what we got by reading T'ncle Tom's Cabin,' and 
from early childhood we were taught the sad story of 4,000,000 
slaves held as property by cruel men of the South. Furthermore, 
we, the young men of the North, were confronted with this propo- 
rtion: Shall we stand by our Government by taking up arms to 
maintain our forefathers' principles of freedom, or submit to South- 
ern rule and the extension of slavery to all our new territory? 
With six boys in our family, three of us — myself, Sylvanus, and 
Henry — volunteered on this proposition. In our reorganization 
Governor Morton sent us Col.'T. W. Bennett, who had seen serv- 
ice in the Thirty-sixth Indiana infantry as major. I well remem- 
ber the iirst week he was with us. He ordered all non-commis- 
sioned officers to meet him in a private lecture, and he said he 
would nut take a lieutenant from one company and make him cap- 
tain in another, as he believed, among the non-commissioned offi- 
cers of each company there was plenty of material from which to 
make commissioned officers. This was a ray of hope and we got 
busy. We had to study, as we were in a new school. We had to 
lay aside our high school books and take up 'Hardee's War Tac- 
tics,' and the ambitious sergeant or corporal could be seen at old 
Camp Wayne on the frosty mornings in November, 1862, soon after 
the roll call, with a drill squad, and with book in hand, teaching the 
manual of arms. About Nov. 1 the news reached Camp Wayne 
that we had been exchanged, and we were hurried down to the Mis- 
sissippi river by the way of Indianapolis and Cairo, 111., and then 
by boat to Memphis, Term., where we were assigned to the Thir- 
teenth corps. We took part in Sherman's Yazoo expedition, which 
was a failure, and then, in January, 1863, were with Sherman in 
his attack on Fort Hindman, on the Arkansas river. This was 
quite a success, resulting in the capture of the Confederate force of 
5,000 men. At this point Gen. P. J. Osterhaus took command of 
our division and was our commander throughout the Vicksburg 
campaign and until August, 1S63. Just about this time General 
Grant conceived the idea of passing Vicksburg by the west coast 
of the river; so we were moved down to Young's Point, La., in 
the lowlands opposite Vicksburg, and the whole army was put on 
police duly to cut a canal across the country and make a safe pas- 
sage for our fleet past Vicksburg. The Sixty-ninth did its share of 
excavating, but the effort was a failure. While we were encamped 
here for six weeks we hist by death thirty men. We were removed 



486 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

from these lowlands up the river to Milliken's Bend. About this 
time in the history of our regiment Chan Perry was promoted from 
adjutant to lieutenant-colonel. The captain of our company — John 
Ross — and Second Lieutenant Jackson had resigned, and our first 
lieutenant, S. J. Miller, was made captain. 1 was promoted from 
second sergeant to first lieutenant, James N. Cropper was made 
second lieutenant, and many other changes were made in different 
companies. During the winter there had been several attempts to 
find a foothold in the rear of Yicksburg, on the east side of the 
river, without success, which determined General Grant to try his 
fortunes by the way of the west bank of the river. The Hood was 
still at its height, the bayous were over their banks for miles, all 
known roads were out of sight, and the prospect of finding a route 
without a very wide detour to the west seemed extremely doubtful. 
The experiment had to be made, nevertheless, and it is the especial 
pride of the Sixty-ninth that it was chosen for the work and that 
it was successful in every particular. Under the command of Gen- 
eral Osterhaus a way was found, and with the Sixty-ninth in ad- 
vance the army followed the west bank down to Perkins' planta- 
tion. The Federal gunboats and transports succeeded in running 
the blockade, thus providing sufficient transportation for the move- 
ment General Grant had in mind. On April 28 the Thirteenth corps 
embarked on transports and followed the gunboats to the vicinity 
of Grand Gulf, where it watched the bombardment by the gun- 
boats until nightfall, when the infantry disembarked and marched 
across the neck of land to Hard Times, where it met the gunboats 
and transports again and was ferried over the river to Bruinsburg 
on the afternoon of April 30. Marching all night with the rest 
of the division to gain the high land back of the river, the Sixty- 
ninth was one of the first to engage in the battle of Port Gibson. 
In this battle the regiment was in the closest situation of its entire 
career. For an hour it engaged the enemy at close range, being 
separated by the brow of a small hill, and after the battle the dead of 
each side lay but 200 feet apart. The regiment lost about seventy- 
five in killed and wounded and sixteen were buried on the battle- 
field in one grave. Following this battle the regiment was engaged 
at Champion's Hill, Black River Bridge, and the two unsuccessful 
assaults at Vicksburg. A few days after the beginning of the siege, 
on May 23, the regiment was ordered back to lilack river and for 
the next six weeks did strenuous duty along its banks, until the 
fall of Vicksburg, July 4. Tt then assisted in the pursuit of John- 
ston back to Jackson, taking part in all the actions that occurred, 
and performed efficient service in the siege of that place. Leaving 
Jackson, July 21, 1863, the regiment returned to Vicksburg. The 
city having fallen, under orders from General Grant, not to exceed 
four enlisted men from each company were given a leave of ab- 
sence and officers were also given a furlough, with the provision 
that at least one commissioned officer must remain with each com- 
pany. Various plans were followed in the different companies to 
select the four favored ones, but in Company 1) we settled, the 
matter by selecting the four oldest married men. As Captain 



BIOGRAPHICAL 487 

Miller had been wounded and Second Lieutenant Cropper had been 
taken prisoner, there was no furlough in sight for me, as I was the 
only commissioned officer left with the company. The last cam- 
paign of the regiment was in 1865. Having been reduced in num- 
bers, the regiment had been consolidated into a battalion of four 
companies on Jan. 31, of that year. It was assigned to the Second 
division, commanded by Gen. C. C. Andrews, and I was detailed as 
ordinance officer on General Andrews' staff. The division left Pen- 
sacola, Fla., March 20, marching through Florida to Pollard, Ala v 
thence westward to the Alabama river, joining the main army at 
Blakeley on April 1. On this march 1 had charge of the ammuni- 
tion train, which consisted of ten government wagons — six mules 
to each wagon — and each wagon loaded to the bows with ammuni- 
tion. The quartermaster's train followed. It was in the spring of 
the year, and the sandy, water-soaked soil was covered by a thin 
sod which easily gave way under weight, and this made progress 
slow and very difficult. Frequently the army was compelled to 
wait until the wagon trains came up with them. To end the siege 
of Blakeley an assault on the works was ordered for April 9, which 
took place at 5:30 p. m., participated in by all of the Federal troops, 
resulting in the capture of the defenses of Mobile and of the 
troops defending them, together with all of the material for war. 
It occurred on the day of Lee's surrender and was virtually the 
last battle of the war. The Sixty-ninth was mustered out on July 
5, 1865." Immediately after the close of the war Mr. Macy was 
employed by T. E. and B. W. Clark, drvgoods merchants of Econ- 
omy, and remained with them one year. He then sold goods for 
himself in Indianapolis two years, at the end of which time he re- 
turned to Economy and taught school one year, it being the first 
school in the first brick school-house on the present school-house 
site. This was in the winter of 1868-69, and about 1870 he was 
induced to buy the old homestead, and for five years he and his 
aged mother kept house, with the aid of the faithful hired hand, 
Willie Leavell, Mr. Macy teaching school in winter and Mr. Leavell 
caring for the stock. On Sept. 28, 1876, he was married to Anna 
Luella Wiggins, of Richmond, a late teacher in the Economy pub- 
lic schools, and this proved a most happy union. For three years 
Mr. Macy engaged extensively in the live stock business" and lived 
in Hagerstown, his brother, Lewis, living with the mother on the 
farm. In the autumn of 1879 he and his family returned to the 
farm and have made it their home until the present writing. At 
the fall election of 1888 Mr. Macy was elected commissioner for 
the western district of Wayne county and commenced his term of 
office, Jan. 1, 1890. lie was a member of the board during the 
building of the present court house. As his sons grew into man- 
hood he has given all his time to farming, and has not been slow 
to adopt new methods in the progress of up-to-date farming. And 
with the opportunities afforded by the general prosperity of our 
country he has added more acres to the old farm, and the old log 
house has been replaced with a more modern farm residence. More 
than 500 sugar trees are yet standing on the old "Sugar Camp 



400 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Farm," and with the improved evaporator maple syrup is one of 
the products of the farm. Being of Quaker ancestry, Mr. Macy 
and his wife, since making- their home on the farm, have always 
attended the Friends' Meeting and are now with their children 
members of the Economy Friends' Meeting. Mrs. Macy was born 
March 26, 1857, an d ' s a woman of lovable character and charitable 
traits. To her and her husband were born live children : Harry 
Burr, born Aug. 10, 1877, has a farm adjoining that of his father, 
married Lillian Parker, of Economy, and they have a child, Lois; 
Frank Wiggins, born Nov. 29, 1879, graduated at Purdue Univer- 
sity with the class of 1906, is a civil engineer on the Pennsylvania 
railroad, located at Pittsburgh, Pa., married Jennie Williams, of 
Economy, and they have a son, Burr Williams; Lawrence Good, 
born Aug. 27, 1884, graduated in the agricultural course at Purdue 
University with the class of 1912; Byram Robbins, born June 9, 
1888, graduated at the Hagerstown High School with the class of 
1910 and resides at the parental home; and Philemon Forrest is a 
student in the same school with the class of 1912. The parents of 
Mrs. Macy were Philemon F. and Mary (Burr) Wiggins, of Rich- 
mond, the former a native of Jericho, Long Island, born Sept. 16, 
1826, and the latter of Hamilton county, Ohio, born March 31, 1828, 
the fourth child of the family. Philemon F. Wiggins came with 
his parents to Richmond in 1833 ( sec sketch of Stephen R. Wig- 
gins). He was a blacksmith by trade, but later engaged in the 
meat business in Richmond and became well known and prominent. 
His business methods were such as to win him hosts of friends 
and he ever had the regard of his fellow men. He served as quar- 
termaster of the Thirty-sixth Indiana infantry in the Civil war, be- 
ing promoted to division quartermaster under General Nelson, and 
was mustered out in 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. His death occurred Sept. 22, 1874, and the tribute paid 
to him by his friends was significant of the esteem and veneration 
in which he was held. He was twice married; first on March 1, 
1848, to Mary Burr, daughter of William and Phoebe (Brown) 
Burr, of Hamilton county, Ohio. She departed this life Oct. 10, 
1865, and after her death Mr. Wiggins married Henrietta M. Mc- 
Cullough, Sept. 22, 1870. 

Oscar Aaron Brown, a resident of Wayne county since his 
birth, was born in Dalton township, this county, March 27, 1865, 
son of Samuel II. and Margaret Ann (Fouts) Brown. The paternal 
grandparents were David and Maria (Knode) Brown. David 
Brown came from Washington county, Maryland, to Wayne coun- 
ty, Indiana, and settled north of Hagerstown, engaged in farming 
the residue of his life and passed away Nov. 13, 1890. (See sketch 
of Adam Rowe.) The maternal grandparents of Oscar A. Brown 
were Jesse and Sarah (Staller) Fouts, the former a native of 
Preble county, Ohio, his parents having migrated there from the 
Carolinas; and the latter was a native of Pennsylvania, coming 
thence to Ohio with her parents, and in that State met and mar- 
ried Jesse Fouts. After their marriage they came to Wayne county 
and located on Martindale creek, in Jefferson township, but" later 



BIOGRAPHICAL 489 

removed to Dalton township, settling on the farm which is now the 
home of their grandson, Oscar A. Brown. There they resided the 
residue of their lives, the grandfather dying July 15, 1892, at the 
age of eighty-one years, and the grandmother passed away Feb. 
27, 1897, at th e a S' e °f ninety-three years. They were the parents 
of two children: Mary A. is the widow of Ellwood Thornburg and 
resides in Jefferson township, and Margaret Ann is the mother of 
Oscar A. Brown. Samuel Harrison Brown, father of Oscar A., 
was horn in Maryland, Jan. 22, 1840, and was about ten years old 
when his parents came to Wayne county. lie was educated in the 
district schools in Maryland and in Wayne county, and assisted his 
father until twenty-one years old, after which lie worked for others 
for a number of years. After his marriage, which occurred Feb. 3, 
1863, he located on the farm of his father-in-law in Dalton town- 
ship. This remained his home the residue of his. life, his death 
occurring Aug. 3, 1892, and his widow resides with her daughter, 
Mrs. Dr. Stotelmyer. Two children were born to these parents — 
Oscar A., and Sarah Alma, born Aug. 12, 1870, wife of Dr. Charles 
I. Stotelmyer (see sketch). Oscar A. Brown received his elemen- 
tary education in the district schools of Dalton township and 
worked on the farm with his father until the death of that parent, 
after which he managed the farm and his grandfather's estate sev- 
eral years, lie purchased the interest of the other heirs in 150 
acres, his present homestead, and has since been most successfully 
and lucratively engaged in his calling. In the matter of politics 
he has been allied with the Democratic party since becoming a 
voter. On Feb. 14, 18S4, Mr. Brown married Miss Allie Ulrich, 
daughter of George and Catherine (McSherley) Ulrich, of Henry 
county, where Mrs. Brown was born Sept. 19, 1865. Of the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Brown there is a daughter, Ruth Irene, born Dec. 
14, 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Church of the 
Brethren, otherwise known as the Dunkard or German Baptist 
The paternal great-grandfather of Mrs. Brown was John 
native of Germany. He came to America when a young 
located at Roaring Springs, Pa., where he married and 
greater part of his life. He was twice married and by 
union had four sons and two daughters — Daniel, John, 
, Jacob, Christian, and David. The second son, John, 
grandfather of Mrs. Brown, was born and reared in Pennsylvania 
and was united in marriage to Catherine Teeter. He came to In- 
diana with his father in an early day and together they purchased 
1,600 acres of land near Hagerstown, the place then being but a 
collection of log cabins. John Ulrich resided in Wayne county until 
the Pennsylvania railroad was completed and then sold out and 
moved to Henry county, upon the farm of 184 acres now owned by 
George Ulrich, father of Mrs. Brown. There he resided the re- 
mainder of his life, dying in 1865 at the age of sixty-two years. To 
him and his good wife were born eleven children — Daniel, Han- 
nah, John, Christian, Elizabeth, Barbara, Mar), Jacob, David, 
George, and Martin T. George Ulrich, father of Mis. Brown, was 
born in Wayne county, Nov. 23, 1840. He was educated 111 the 



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-]9° MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

district school and remained with his father until twenty-one years 
old. On Oct. 6, i860, he was married to Catherine E. McSherley, a 
native of Henry county, horn July 29, 1842, daughter of William 
and Margaret (Lochridge) McSherley. William McSherley was 
an early settler of Indiana, coming from Kentucky, and died about 
1842. His daughter, Catherine E., who became Mrs. Ulrich, was 
reared and educated in Henry county and taught school in Liberty 
township. After his marriage George I'lrich located on the home 
farm and looked after his father's interests until the death of that 
parent ; then purchased the interest of the other heirs and now has 
a fine farm of 184 acres. He followed general farming until 1896, 
engaging extensively in stock raising, but since that year has lived 
in comparative retirement, a highly respected citizen of Liberty 
township, Henry county. He is a member of the German Baptist 
Church, and in politics is a Democrat. To him and his estimable 
wife were born two children: Amanda A., born June 14, 1861, 
died June 28, 1884. She became the wife of Alfred Waltz, and to 
them was born a daughter, Lena A., the wife of Edward O. Bee- 
son (see sketch). Allie A., the second daughter, is the wife of Oscar 
A. Brown. 

Frank Waltz, a prominent farmer of Dalton township, was 
born in the township of Clay, near Green's Fork, Aug. 8, 1865. He 
is a son of William and Sarah E. (Routh) Waltz, born in Wayne 
county, where they were married and have always resided. The 
paternal grandparents were Peter and Sarah (Luce) Waltz, the 
former a native of Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, and the latter 
of Wayne county, Indiana. Peter Waltz came to Wayne county in 
an early day with his parents, who settled below Germantown, and 
was married in this county. He was engaged in the saw mill busi- 
ness during the greater part of his life, having erected two mills, 
one of which was located northwest of Hagerstown, along Nettle 
creek. He sold his mill interests during the Civil war. Peter 
Waltz was born Nov. 13, 1810, and died Feb. 23, 1881, at the home 
of his son, William, in Dalton township. His wife, Sarah, was born 
July 11, 1814, and died in September, 1896. Of their union were 
seven children: Elizabeth, born Aug. 24, 1833, died in infancy; 
Phoebe, bom May 6, 1836, is the widow of Seneca Keever and re- 
sides at Cambridge City; Levi, born Aug. 25, 1838, wdio served as 
a soldier in the Civil war with the Sixty-ninth Indiana infantry, 
and was a millwright by occupation, is deceased; Rebecca, born 
Oct. 9, 1840, is the widow of Benjamin Rafe and resides in Jeffer- 
son township ; William is the next in order of birth ; Charlotte, 
born Aug. 7, 1846, became the wife of J. Henry Leavell and is 
deceased; and Pauline, born Sept. 5, 1852, died in infancy. William 
Waltz, father of Frank, was born just north of Hagerstown, in 
Jefferson township, Jan. 31, 1845. He was married Aug. 2, '1864, 
to Sarah Elizabeth Routh, born Aug. 20, 1846, daughter of Joseph 
and Malinda (Thornburgh) Routh, natives of Dalton township, 
where her mother died in 1851 and her father in 1859. She is the 
first born of her parents and there were two other daughters and 
a son in the family; also a half brother and four half sisters. Wil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 49 1 

Ham Waltz was educated in the schools of Jefferson township and 
upon reaching maturity worked in his father's mills along Nettle 
creek for a few years. About 1870 he located at his present home 
in the southern part of Dalton township. There he erected a saw 
mill on his farm of 102 acres, and the mill has continued in opera- 
tion up to the present time. He did general sawing, and in addi- 
tion did contracting and building to a considerable extent, erecting 
churches, stores, dwellings, etc., in various places. He also fol- 
lowed general farming, but is now living practically retired, lie 
and his wife are the parents of three children: Frank is the eldest; 
Cora Lee, born Aug. 12, 1870, is the wife of Harry Buttles, of Con- 
nersville, Ind., and they have three children — Ellis Andley, Frank 
Lee, and Mary Routh ; and Ada, born Aug. 31, 1877, was educated 
in the normal school at Terre Haute and for the past ten years has 
been a teacher in the schools of Hagerstown. Frank Waltz re- 
ceived his early education in the district schools of Dalton town- 
ship and in the schools of Hagerstown, and at an early age began 
work at the carpenter trade, which he followed until 1901. Dur- 
ing this time he was associated with his father and they did general 
contracting on various kinds of buildings. They erected the Odd 
Fellows' building at Hagerstown, a church in Indianapolis, a num- 
ber of buildings in Richmond, Dublin, and New Castle, school 
buildings in a number of townships, and many residences in 
Wayne county. In 1901 Mr. Waltz purchased 136 acres of land in 
Dalton township, the tract being known as the "Harry Cheesman 
Farm," and in addition to its cultivation he farms other tracts 
which he has rented near his home. Up to a few years ago he con- 
tinued to be active in contract work, but of late has devoted con- 
siderable of his time to farming. His residence is one of the most 
modern in Wayne county, built according to his own plans, and 
his ideas of comfort, beauty, and usefulness are fully carried out 
in its construction. From 1891 to 1901 he resided at what is now 
the J. C. Keever home. In the matter of politics Mr. Waltz is al- 
lied with the Republican party. On Aug. 8, 1891, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Sarah Florence Lumpkin, of Dalton township, 
daughter of the late Rufus M. and Rachel Jane (Jordan) Lumpkin. 
Of this union there are four children: Charles R., born June 2, 
1892; William R., born May 20, 1896; Alma R., born March 21, 
1898; and Ralph H., born Feb. 13, 1904. Rufus M. Lumpkin, 
father of Mrs. Waltz, was born in Wayne county, April 15, 1835, 
son of James Lumpkin, a native of Virginia who removed to Ten- 
nessee and thence to Wayne county, locating on what is now the 
James and Elmer Lumpkin homestead. Rufus M. took possession 
of the same farm about 1872 and spent the residue of his life there, 
dying Aug. 2, 1907. Fie was married Sept. 9, 1S58, to Rachel Jane 
Jordan, daughter of John and Catherine (Davidson) Jordan, of 
Ferry township. Iiis wife was born March 15, 1843, an d cl ieel April 
3, 1909, the mother of nine children — Mary, America J., Robert, 
Sarah Florence, Charles, James, Oren, John C. and Elmer, all of 
whom are living with the exception of Charles and Oren, who died 
in infancy. 



492 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

George Lincoln Thornburgh, a prominent young real estate 
and insurance man of the city of Richmond, and formerly a resi- 
dent of Dalton township, was born in that township, Aug. 31, 1869, 
son of Dempsey Carver and Ethelinda (Williams) Thornburgh 
(see sketch of Dempsey C. Thornburgh). lie received his pre- 
liminary education in the schools of Economy and then went to 
Richmond, where he took the classical course at Earlham College. 
In 1891 he engaged in agricultural pursuits on the farm which he 
still owns in the eastern part of Dalton township, and which con- 
sists of 140 acres of his father's estate, lie took possession of this 
tract in 1904 and remained thereon, engaged in general farming", 
until 1910, when he removed to the city of Richmond and has since 
been engaged in the insurance and real estate business. Although 
he has been in this business but a comparatively short time he has 
already built it up to extensive proportions, with line prospects for 
the future. In his political relations he is allied with the Republican 
party, and lie is prominently identified with the Masonic lodge at 
Hagerstown and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Econ- 
omy. On Dec. 25, 1892, Mr. Thornburgh was married to Abbie A. 
Botkin, daughter of William T. and Martha (Cropper) Botkin, na- 
tives' of Randolph county, and of this union there is one child. 
Crozier ]'«., born Jan. 22, 1895. Mr. Thornburgh has a wide circle 
of friends who predict for him unqualified success in his chosen 
occupation. 

James Townsend is one of the venerable ami honored members 
of the agricultural community of Wayne county and is still en- 
gaged .111 that occupation in the township of New Garden, where he 
has long resided, lie is one of seven children of Stephen and Mary 
(Griffin) Townsend, natives of Wayne county. The paternal 
grandfather was John Townsend, born in Pennsylvania of English 
parentage, in 1758. At the age of seventeen he joined the Revo- 
lutionary army under General Greene and served four years. While 
with this command in South Carolina he contracted smallpox and 
was given a furlough for treatment. While yet in the early stage 
of the disease he started on foot across the country to reach a place 
where he might receive treatment, but after walking a few days 
fell exhausted from travel and the weakness caused by the disease. 
As fate would have it, while thus lying in the woods he was dis- 
covered by Miss Elvira Cain, a young girl of twelve years, who in 
company with a negro servant was hunting the cows. She in- 
sisted that the stricken soldier accompany her to her father's home 
and there be taken care of. Mr. Townsend objected to going to the 
house, for fear of spreading the disease among the members of the 
family, but he slopped at an unoccupied cabin on the plantation and 
there was cared for by one of Mr. Cain's slaves who was immune. 
After his recovery he returned to his command and served out his 
term of enlistment, receiving an honorable discharge. Immediate- 
ly thereafter he returned to the home of the girl who had saved his 
life, and asked for and received her hand in marriage. They began 
their married life together in North Carolina and lived there a num- 
ber of years, coming to Indiana in 1803. Mr. Townsend settled 



KIOC.KAi'IlICAI. 493 

upon and cleared a tract of land adjoining the present city of 
Richmond on the south, and there he lived until about 1830, when 
he removed to a farm two miles north of Centerville. lie died at 
the residence of his daughter, Airs. Isaac Commons, at the advanced 
aged of ninety-six years. During the last twenty years of his life 
he was afflicted with blindness, one of his eyes having been lost 
while a soldier in the Revolutionary war. While living in North 
Carolina he and his wife became converted to the principles of 
peace as taught and practiced by the Society of Friends. As an 
evidence of their supreme faith in these teachings there are two 
incidents that deserve mention. As a Revolutionary soldier Mr. 
Townsend was entitled to a government pension, and during the 
last twenty years of his life was tendered a pension payment every 
three months. Rut although stricken with blindness he steadfastly 
refused to accept it, saying that pension money was blood money, 
and that he had enlisted under a Captain of Reace and was no 
longer serving under General Greene. At the time of the death of 
the father of Mrs. Townsend she inherited seven full grown slaves, 
worth from $700 to $1,000 each. The administrator of her father's 
estate came to Indiana, where she and her husband were living in 
humble circumstances, and offered to buy the slaves and pay her 
the market price. She refused the offer and asked to have the 
slaves sent to her, and upon their arrival in Indiana she gave them 
their freedom. The grandparents were thus numbered among the 
pioneer settlers of Eastern Indiana, where they took up their abode 
a number of years prior to the admission of the State to the Union, 
and James Townsend himself is one of the rapidly thinning class 
of sterling citizens whose memories link the formative period in the 
history of this section with the later days of opulent prosperity and 
advancement. It is well that the reminiscences of such citizens be 
perpetuated for future generations, for all too soon will have passed 
away those who can, from personal experience, relate the tales and 
recall the conditions of the pioneer era. Stephen Townsend, the 
father, was born in Wayne township, this county, Dec. 31, 1810, 
and attended school in the famous Jonathan Roberts log school- 
house, later farming the home place and teaching school during 
the winter months. In 1836 he was married to Alary Griffin, at 
West Grove Church, this county, and after his marriage moved to 
Randolph county, where he settled on Cabin creek. After five 
years he returned to Wayne county and settled two miles south- 
east of Green's Fork. To him and his good wife were born seven 
children: Elvira was born in Randolph county in 1837; Sarah was 
born in Randolph county in 1839, and died in 1871 ; James is the 
next in order of birth; the fourth was Jacob, and the fifth was 
Ella, who married George Hartley, of Wayne county; the sixth 
was Lindley and the seventh was Caroline, who married Thomas 
Woodard and died in 1908. James Townsend was born in Clay 
township, Wayne county, Indiana, in 1841, and as a boy watched 
the building of the old log cabin Horner school-house, where he 
afterward attended school five or six years. At the age of twelve 
years he removed with his parents to West Grove, in Center town- 



494 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ship, where he attended the Friends' school four years. When he 
was sixteen years old the family removed to Lee county, Iowa, 
where he continued his schooling-, and he remained at the parental 
home until twenty-two years old. His first undertaking in his inde- 
pendent career was the leasing of a coal mine, which he operated 
successfully one season, and then managed a sorghum mill three 
months. After this he engaged in the buying and shipping of cattle 
and hogs, which enterprise demanded his attention until his return 
to Wayne count)-, where he settled on the farm where he has since 
continued to reside. It is needless to say that no citizen is held 
in more unequivocal confidence and esteem than Mr. Townsend, 
and he is known as a loyal and public-spirited man and as a worthy 
member of the agricultural fraternity, with which he has been iden- 
tified from his early manhood. Both he and Ids wife are zealous 
members of the Friends' church, in which he has served as over- 
seer for more than twenty years. In 1807 was Solemnized the mar- 
riage of .Mr. Townsend to Miss Phebe Anna Crampton, the cere 
mony being performed in the New Garden Church. Of this union 
were born three children: Anna Mary, born Oct. 28, 1867, married 
W. Irving Kelsey, are both graduates of Earlham College, and 
they have served as missionaries in Mexico. The husband served 
three years as president of Pacific College at Newberg, Ore., and 
resigned that position to accept the position of Professor of Biblical 
Instruction in Penn College at Oskaloosa, Iowa; Lorena, born 
March 12, 18(19, married Prof. J. C. Hodson and resides at New- 
berg, Ore.; and Maurice L., born Feb. 18, 1877, graduated in the 
high school at Fountain City and afterward at the Richmond Busi- 
ness College, lie then attended the Pacific College, in Oregon, 
three terms, graduating in the medical school of the State Univer- 
sity. Taking a post-graduate course in surgery, at the age of 
twenty-eight he went to Victoria, Mexico, where he practiced his 
profession four years and then became superintendent of one of 
the largest landed estates in that republic. Merrick Crampton, the 
father of Mrs. Townsend, was born in 1804, in Culpeper county, 
Virginia, lie was permanently crippled by an accident at the age 
of seventeen, but became a very successful and well-to-do farmer, 
first removing to Ohio and later to Indiana. He married Anna 
Smith, daughter of Jacob Smith, in 1824, in Wayne county, and 
of this union were born eight children: Sarah, born June 10, 1825^ 
Rachel, born Oct. n, 1827; Martha, born Nov. 10, 1829; J. Smith, 
bom Jan. 9, 1832; Mary, born Dec. 13, 1834, died in infancy; Sam- 
uel, born Aug. 10, 1837; Letitia, born April 24, 1840; and Mrs. 
Townsend, the youngest, was born Sept. 29, 1844. 

Abraham Cuppy Stanley, a successful farmer of Wayne town- 
ship (farm located on Rural Route No. 5), was born near the vil- 
lage of Boston, this count)-, Jan. 2^, 1850, a member of a family that 
settled in Indiana in an early day, the forebears being natives of 
North Carolina. The earliest known ancestor of the Stanley fam- 
ily was Thomas Stanley, of England. His son, Joseph, was born 
about 1760, the youngest in a family of fourteen children. He 
emigrated from England to Guilford county, North Carolina, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 495 

there met and married Catherine Hilton, born in Maryland, from 
whence she had migrated to Guilford county, North Carolina. To 
Joseph and Catherine Stanley were bum eleven children, of whom 
Aaron was the sixth. The father, Joseph, lost his life while mov- 
ing with his family to Ohio, about the year 1810. lie was thrown 
from his horse into the Adkin river and his body was never re- 
covered. He belonged to the Friends' Society and was about 
fifty years old at the time of his death. His family continued their 
journey to their home in the West. Aaron Stanley was born in 
Guilford county, North Carolina, in 1787, and with the other mem- 
bers of the family reached Clermont county, Ohio, in 1810. He 
married Mary Cuppy in 1811 and to them were born thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom Levi, father of Abraham C, was the second. Aaron 
died in r866. llis wife, Mary Cuppy, was born in 1705 and died 
in 1849. Aaron Stanley was a strong' and active member of early 
Methodism, and was an advocate of the Federalist party, which 
was later succeeded by the Whig party. Levi Stanley was born 
July 13, 1 8 1 4, ami married Susannah Butler, Jan. 14, 1836. He was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and his political affili- 
ations were with the Republican party. He spent many years of 
his life as a farmer in Boston township, his death occurring April 
25, 1891. His wife, Susannah Butler, was born May 20, 1819, and 
her remote ancestors were Friends and came with William Peiin 
to America. Her parents migrated to Wayne county, Indiana, 
where she was born, one of eight children. Her father came from 
the State of Georgia to Indiana Territory in 1S06, ami her mother, 
Mary Davenport, came from North Carolina, about 1810, with her 
parents. Susannah was a member of the Methodist church from 
1842 to the time of her death, Dec. 7, 1887. Of her union with 
Levi Stanley were born eleven children: Francis Marion married 
Barbara Bulla and is a farmer in Union county, Indiana; Mary 
Elizabeth died at the age of eighteen years; William Henry, de- 
ceased, served as a soldier in the Civil war with the One Hundred 
and Thirty-third Indiana infantry; Rebecca Jane is the widow of 
B. F. Campbell and resides at New Paris, Ohio; Jesse Butler mar- 
ried Hannah Watson and is a farmer in Perry township, Wayne 
county; Isaac Newton, deceased, married Gulielma E. Jessup and 
his widow resides in Randolph county, having a son, Isaac New- 
ton, a minister of the Friends' church and the principal of a high 
school in Henry county; Abraham C. is the seventh in order of 
birth ; Anna Eliza is the wife of D. W. Church, an attorney at 
Greenfield, Iowa; Mary Emma is the wife of Charles Druley, a 
merchant at Middletown, Ind. ; Susannah Ella is the wife of Thomas 
Smelser, a carpenter at Anderson, Ind.; and Levi Elhvood mar- 
ried Catherine Spencer and is an electrician at St. Charles, La. 
Levi Stanley, the father, was one of the most prominent and ener- 
getic farmers and landholders in Wayne count)-, accumulating his 
property by honest efforts, thus enabling his children to become 
honorable and reliable citizens by following the precept of his ex- 
ample. He and his wife were noted for their hospitality, generos- 
ity, jovial dispositions, and sterling Christian characters, leaving 



496 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

their children a good inheritance and a rich legacy. Abraham C. 
Stanley was reared on a farm and educated in the public schools 
of Boston township. On Feb. 19, 1879, he was married to Miss 
Anna Mary Cook, born April 1, 1S60, only daughter of Isaac and 
Martha (Crampton) Cook, deceased. Her father was twice mar- 
ried : first to Mary Reagan, deceased, of which union there is a 
daughter, Hannah Josephine, wife of H. S. Matthewson, a commer- 
cial salesman of Dayton, Ohio. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. 
Stanley were Merrick and Anna S. Crampton, of Wayne county. 
Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley were born two sons — Isaac 
Olio, born Dec. 14, 1880, and Charles Asa, born Feb. 8, 1883, the 
former of whom was educated in the common schools and a busi 
ness college and is engaged in farming in Wayne township, and 
the latter was educated in the common and high school, resides in 
Richmond and is a fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad. Isaac 
Orlo was married June 4, 1902, to Aurelia C. Iredell, born Oct. 25, 
1883, daughter of Samuel E. and Sarah (Dilks) Iredell, of Wayne 
township. Of this union have been born three children — Arthur 
Marion and Robert Earl, twins, the last named being deceased, and 
Alice May, born in December, 1908. Charles Asa was married 
April 29, 1903, to Bessie Elliott, and of this union there are three 
children: Paul G-, born Aug. 26, 1904; Ralph E., born Sept. 7, 
190(1; Esther L., born May 8, 1908; and Dorothy M., born June 9, 
1910. The late Zachariah Stanley, a prominent citizen of Union 
county, left an estate of several thousand dollars, the income from 
which is to be used to educate Stanley children. Abraham C. Stan- 
ley's children were eligible, but did not use their advantage. Mr. 
Stanley is a Republican in his political convictions but has never 
sought public office, and he and his wife are identified with the East 
Main Street Friends' Church, in Richmond. 

Louis Nelson Hampton, a progressive farmer residing in New 
Garden township, was born at Spring Grove, Wayne county, May 
22, 1866. His parents were Lewis and Esther (Stanton) Hampton, 
the former born in what is now Webster township, Wayne county, 
March 24, 1819, and the latter a native of Union county, born May 
26, 1822. Lewis Hampton was a son of David and jane (Moon) 
Hampton, the former a native of West Virginia (then a part of 
Virginia), and the latter of North Carolina. They were married in 
Ohio, April 2, 1818, and moved from Waynesville, that State, to 
Indiana, where they continued to reside until their respective 
deaths, he on June 12, 1855, and she, Dec. 4, 1885. To these hon- 
ored parents eleven children were born: Lewis, March 24, 1819; 
Jacob, Nov. 14, 1820; Dayton, Sept. 28, 1822, died April 26, 1833; 
Julia Ann, Dec. 20, 1824, died April 30, 1833; Jehiel, Oct. 10, 1826; 
Emily Jane, June 14, 1829, died Dec. 4, 1885; William, Feb. 22, 
1832; Sarah Ann, Jan. 6, 1835; and John Dunham and Mahlon T. 
(twins), Nov. 19, 1839; and a twin brother of William, who died 
at birth. All are deceased but Sarah Ann, who resides at Mon- 
rovia, Morgan county, and Mahlon T., a resident of Dayton, Ohio. 
Lewis Hampton, the father of Louis N., was a successful farmer 
all of his life, and died at his home in Wayne township, Sept. 9, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 497 

1897. lie was married to Esther Stanton, in Richmond, Oct. 29, 
184O, and they became the parents of six children: Albert S., born 
July 24, 1847, resides in Indianapolis; Henry J., born Aug. 12, 1850; 
Virginia, born March 2, 1852; Maurice M., born April 18, 1854; 
William Dayton, born Nov. 5, 1858; and Louis N., the youngest of 
the family. Louis N. Hampton assisted in cultivating the Wayne 
township farm and was reared to agricultural pursuits. In 1886 
he began his independent career by renting land and in 1900 pur- 
chased the farm upon which he has since resided, in New Garden 
township. In November, 1910, he was elected a member of the 
Wayne County Council, lie is a member of the .Masonic lodge, 
No. 607, at Fountain City, in which he has held several offices. 
On Oct. 12, 1892, Mr. Hampton married Miss Bertha Iredell, daugh- 
ter of John S. and Sidney (Dilks) Iredell, of Wayne township, 
both deceased, and of this union have been horn nine children: 
Edith Sidney, bom Oct. 9, 1S93; Helen, May 16, 1895; Hilda. Feb. 
5, 1807; Maurice Nelson, April 23, 1899; Mark Iredell, April 2, 
1901; Elsie, Sept. 11, 1903; Philip, Jan. 9, 1907; Lillian, March 23, 
1909, and Robert Louis, Feb, 11, 1911. Mrs. 1 lampion was born 
April 2, i8(')8, and was educated in the Wayne township district 
schools and the Richmond High School. John S. Iredell, father 
of Mrs. Hampton, was born Jul}- 2, 1839, and Sidney Dilks, his first 
wife, was born April 10, 1845. The former was a native of Wayne 
county and the latter of Philadelphia, Pa. They were married July 
16, 1867. The mother of Mrs. Iredell moved to Preble county, 
Ohio, and brought her children with her, settling near New Paris. 
John S. Iredell died Nov. 12, 1908, and his first wife died Feb. 3, 
1883. He was a Republican in politics and both he and his wife 
were members of the Friends' Church, lie was a farmer during 
most of his life and served three years as a soldier in the Civil war, 
a member of Co. I, 84th Indiana infantry. To him and his wife 
were born three children, of whom Mrs. Hampton is the eldest; 
Mary Anna, born Nov. 2, 1869, died Feb. 25, 1896; and Rachel S., 
born Oct. 27, 1876, resides in Wayne county. After the death of 
his first wife Mr. Iredell was married, Dec. 8, 1887, to Mrs. Sarah 
M. Duvall, of Richmond. She was the widow of James M. Dtivall, 
a veteran of the Civil war, and she resides in Richmond. Louis N. 
Hampton is a Republican in politics and he and his family are 
members of the Friends' Church. 

William Frederick Deitemeyer has for several years been one 
of the successful citizens of the township of New Garden, where 
he conducted a farm of modern facilities and appointments, the 
same being favorably located and one of the finest in the county. 
Mr. Deitemeyer is a native son of Germany, but in Wayne county 
has worked his way up to a position of priority as a reliable and 
progressive farmer and loyal citizen. William Frederick Deite- 
meyer was born in Schledehassen, Hanover, Germany, Nov. 12, 
1864, a son of Henry and Christina (Jonse) Deitemeyer, natives of 
Germany. The paternal grandfather was Adam Deitemeyer, born 
in Schledehassen, Hanover, Germany, in 1790, and died in 1857. He 
was a farmer by occupation, owned the farm on which he lived, 



498 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

and for years was a member of the school board and served a 
long term as Forester and trustee of his district. The grandmother 
was born in 1796 and died in 1876. Henry Deitemeyer was born 
Jan. 22, 1835, and was reared to maturity in his native country, 
where he received a very good education. At the age of twenty- 
one years he married Christina Jonse and spent his entire career on 
the old homestead as a farmer, succeeding to his father's public 
offices. Of their children, John Henry, born Jan. 4, 1857, came to 
America in 1884 and died in 1908, at Lincoln, Neb. ; John Frederick, 
born in 1859, lives in Germany, having succeeded to the home place 
and to the offices held by his father and grandfather; Minnie was 
born in April, 1861 ; the subject of this review is the next in order 
of birth ; Elizabeth was born April 20, 1866; August was born in 
March, 1868; and Liseta was born in 1874. William F. Deitemeyer 
was reared on the old home farm in German)' and his early edu- 
cational advantages were those afforded in the schools of his native 
country. He early became identified with the work of the farm and 
remained on the old homestead until he had attained to the age of 
twenty years, when he came to America with his older brother, 
John Henry. He went direct to St. Louis, Mo., where he worked 
for a short time in a bakery, and in 1885 came to Richmond, this 
count}', and worked on a farm eighteen months. He then worked 
five years for William Parry, on a farm, after which he worked m 
Horner's bakery, in Richmond, two years. In 1893 he leased the 
Buhl farm, southwest of Richmond, and operated it two years, after 
which he rented the Samuel Parry farm, in New Garden township. 
In 1905 he purchased the farm of 100 acres where he resided until 
the fall of 191 1, when he removed to Richmond. Mr. Deitemeyer's 
progress has been the result of his own well directed efforts, and 
he is well deserving of the success and prestige which he has 
gained. He takes a loyal interest in public affairs, especially those 
of a local order, and is arrayed as a stalwart supporter of the cause 
of the Republican party. On Sept. 7, 1892, Mr. Deitemeyer was 
united in marriage to Miss Rose Lawler, daughter of James and 
Mary Ann Lawler (deceased), of New Garden township (father 
now residing in Richmond, retired), and of this union there were 
bom two children — Lawler, Nov. 2, 1893, and Blanche, June 6, 
1903. The wife and mother died on Dec. 17, 1905, and on May 15, 
1909, Mr. Deitemeyer married Ida Cornelia Strasser, born Oct. 3, 
1873, daughter of Louis and Theresa Strasser, of Columbus, Ohio, 
but natives of Alsace, France. Mr. Deitemeyer has been a member 
of Lodge No. 115, Knights of Pythias, at Richmond, for the past 
twenty-two years. 

Charles O. Williams, a prominent young educator of Rich- 
mond, at the present time occupying the responsible position of 
County Superintendent of Schools of Wayne county, was born on 
a farm near Fountain City, Ind., Sept. 19, 1874, a son of John D. 
and Malissa (Thomas) Williams, the former being of Virginia de- 
scent and his mother's parents were Pennsylvanians. His parents 
were hard-working people, with a large family, and without the 
means to give their children more than a common school education. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 499 

But this did not suppress Charles' zeal in the pursuit of knowl- 
edge, and with him it has been a lifelong quest. Few men have 
spent as many years in actual teaching and at the same time carry- 
ing college courses as he. From the time he was six years old he has 
been continually in school as a student or teacher. By teaching school 
in winter and going to school in summer, he graduated at the age 
of thirty at Valparaiso College, receiving the Bachelor of Science 
degree. At the age of thirty-three he also graduated at the Indi- 
anapolis Law School and was admitted to the bar in both Indiana 
and Kentucky; and at the age of fifty-five completed the course 
at the Indiana Business College. lie began teaching school in 
Franklin township in 1892, and has since been continuously en- 
gaged in educational work, lie served as assistant principal oi 
the Webster High School two years, as principal of the Economy 
schools two years, principal and superintendent of the Williams- 
burg schools seven years, and from 1905 to 1909 was superintendent 
of the city schools at Wickliffe, Ky. While residing in Kentucky 
he served as a member of the Kentucky Board of School Examiners 
three years. He returned to the Williamsburg schools in 1909 and 
was engaged in teaching there until elected County Superintendent 
of Schools of Wayne county, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the 
resignation of Charles W. Jordan, and in June, 1911, he was elected 
to a full term in that position. Fraternally he is prominently iden- 
tified with the Royal Arch Masons, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. On Sept. 1, 1897, occurred his 
marriage to Miss Florence E. Clinehens, of Webster township, and 
of this union are four children: Harold, born in 1899; Otis, born 
in 1904.; Leland, deceased, born in 1906; and Dale, born in 191 1. 

Oliver Spencer, for many years a prosperous and highly es- 
teemed agriculturist of Franklin township, is a native of Darke 
county, Ohio, born Jan. 16, 1861, on the old Spencer homestead. 
The paternal great-grandfather was Francis Spencer, born in Eng- 
land in 1778 and emigrated to America when young, lie came to 
Ohio in an early day and died in Darke county in 1870. His wife 
was Sarah Spencer, a distant relative of his family, and they be- 
came the parents of ten children — Anderson, Ludlow, William, 
Clark, Jackson, Mark, Elizabeth, Delilah, Eliza Ann. and Sarah. 
Anderson Spencer, the eldest of these children, was born in Green 
county, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1806. He was reared to man's estate in his 
native county and became prominent in business affairs. His life 
was one of industry and he was a man possessed of more than 
ordinary ability and mechanical ingenuity. In 1830 he was mar- 
ried to Emily Hill, of Darke county, Ohio, and to them were born 
seven children — John F., Hugh, Saul, Sarah K., Lemuel, Anderson, 
and George W. John F. Spencer, the eldest, and the father ot 
Oliver Spencer, was born in Ohio, Feb. 6, 1831. lie was educated 
in the common schools of his native State and was a man of affairs 
in his county, following agricultural pursuits throughout his active 
career. On Feb. 26, 1857, he was married to Miss Mary Auker- 
man, a daughter of Lewis and Mary (Brower) Aukerman, the for- 
mer a native of Preble county, Ohio, and the latter horn in Pales- 



500 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

tine, Va. Of this union there were eight children : Lewis resides 
in Darke county, Ohio; Laura A. married Calvin Young, of Darke 
county, Ohio; Oliver is third in order oi birth; Minerva J. married 
William Pattee ; Settie A. married Newton Clapp ; Charles resides 
in Richmond, Ind.j and Minnie and Phenie are deceased. John F. 
Spencer, the father of these children, was a soldier in the Civil war. 
He was a Qniversalist in his religious belief and in politics was a 
Republican. Oliver Spencer acquired his educational training in 
the district schools of his native county and worked upon his 
father's and neighboring farms until twenty-six years old, when 
he rented a farm about two miles east of New Paris, Ohio, and 
lived there eight years, lie then purchased the farm where he 
resides, consisting of 143 acres, upon which he built a fine residence 
in 1902. lie is affiliated with the Republican party and his reli- 
gious faith is expressed by membership in the Christian Church at 
Hollandsburg, Ohio. On Feb. 5, 1887, he was united in marriage 
to Miss Lima Hill, daughter of Whitmel and Mary Ann (Harrison) 
Hill, of Franklin township. Mrs. Spencer died Jan. 28, 1910, hav- 
ing become the mother of two children : Mary Edna, born Dec. 19, 
1887, resides at home with her father; and Harry \V., born June 29, 
1889, married Edna Blose, daughter of James M. and Rachel Alice 
(Wood) Blose, of Franklin township. Mr. Spencer is a member of 
Victory Lodge, No. 476, Knights of Pythias, at Hollandsburg, 
Ohio. 

Rolla L. Overman, for many years a prominent and influential 
agriculturist of the township of Franklin, and ex-road supervisor, 
is a native of the Hoosier State, born on the farm where he resides, 
Jan. 17, 1865, son of Nathan S. and Anna Parker (Fulghum) Over- 
man. The father first beheld the light of day near Elkton, in 
Preble county, Ohio, July 14, 1822. He remained at home until 
married, Nov. 20, 1844, and then entered land in Miami county, 
Indiana, where he resided one year, at the end of which period, on 
account of his wife's health, he returned to Wayne county and, 
in 1850, purchased the farm upon which his son, Rolla L., resides. 
Here he continued to reside many years and was ever an exceed- 
ingly industrious, thrifty and enterprising man. He lived on his 
farm until 1893, when he built a tine residence in Fountain City, 
and there resided until 1898, when he returned to the farm and 
lived the residue of his life with his son, passing away Aug. 29, 
1906. His wife, mother of Rolla L. Overman, was born in Ran- 
dolph county, July 25, 1824, daughter of Frederick and Piety (Par- 
ker) Fulghum, who came from North Carolina to Indiana, and she 
passed to the Great Unknown, April 19, 1898. The paternal grand- 
parents were Jesse and Keziah Overman, who migrated from Vir- 
ginia to Preble county, Ohio, and later to Wayne county, Indiana, 
where the father purchased government land and lived the remain- 
der of his life. The subject of this sketch received his educational 
training at the old Garner school on the Arba pike, which he at- 
tended until twenty years old. Having been reared on a farm, he 
learned at a tender age the rigorous lessons of hard work and self- 
dependence and at the same time acquired an intimate knowledge 



BIOGRAPHICAL 5OI 

of agricultural pursuits. Farming has continued to be his chief 
occupation to this clay and he has always resided upon and winked 
the old home place. In politics he has been a loyal member of 
the Republican party from the time of becoming a voter, and as 
before stated has served as road supervisor. ( )n Oct. 22, 1892, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Olive Owens, daughter of William 
and Amanda (Horn) Owens, prominent residents of Darke county, 
Ohio. Mrs. Overman was born in Darke count}', Oct. 20, 1869, 
where she continued to reside up to the time of her marriage, the 
ceremony being performed at Greenville. One child, Thclma A., 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Overman, Nov. 4, 1898, and she is at- 
tending school at Fountain City. Mr. Overman is a birthright 
member of the Society of Friends, of which his wife and daugh- 
ter are also members. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Over- 
man — James and Anna Owens — were natives of North Carolina 
and her maternal ancestors — Balsar and Nancy Horn — came from 
Germany. 

Lot Skinner, a prosperous farmer of Franklin township, is a 
native of that township, born on a farm southwest of Bethel, July 
22, 1836, son of Joseph and Didamia (Elliott) Skinner, natives of 
North Carolina. The maternal grandfather was Benjamin Elliott, 
who removed from Guilford county, North Carolina, to Preble 
county, Ohio, and died soon afterward. Joseph Skinner, the father, 
was born Feb. 10, 1797, always followed farming as an occupa- 
tion, and died July 19, 1882. The mother was bom Oct. 21, 1802, 
and died April 30, 1879. They were the parents of ten children — 
seven sons and three daughters. Lot received his educational 
training in the schools of his native township and, Feb. 2^, 1863, 
was united in matrimony to Miss Nancy Hill, daughter of YVhit- 
mel and Mariam (Halowell) Hill, many years residents of Franklin 
township., lie operated his father's farm about fifteen years after 
marriage and then purchased the farm he owns, lie has always 
gained his livelihood by tilling the soil and is an enthusiastic fol- 
lower of his calling. In politics he is an ardent champion of the 
Democratic party, though never a seeker after public office, believ- 
ing that the office should seek the man rather than the man the 
office. Mr. Skinner is a liberal as regards his religious views and 
is affiliated with no particular church society. Five children graced 
the fireside of this worthy couple — Andrew J., Freeman, Evaline 
(died Nov. 26, 1893), Elmore, and Maude Estella. Andrew J. mar- 
ried Clara Hill and is a farmer in Franklin township. Freeman 
married Irene Boyd, resides at Maumee, Ohio, and they have five 
children — Lois M., Joseph, Pauline, Frederick and Lenora. El- 
more married Nellie Cheneworth, resides at Bethel, and they have 
one child, Murrell. Maude Estella is the wife of Leroy Corrall, of 
Franklin township, and they have four children — Edith J., Grace, 
Harold, and Dorothy. On July 25, 1892, the fireside of the Skinner 
home was darkened by the shadow of the death angel and Mrs. 
Skinner was summoned to her reward, leaving her devoted hus- 
band and children to mourn her loss. She was ever a kind and 
considerate wife and mother and the entire community in which 



502 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

she resided lamented her untimely taking away. Sinse the death 
of his wife Mr. Skinner has lived retired, making his home with 
his daughter, Mrs. Corrall. 

Nathan Grave, a popular agriculturist of the township of 
Franklin, is a native of Wayne county, born on a farm one and 
three-fourths miles southeast of Middleborough, in Wayne town- 
ship, Nov. 4, 1848, a son of Joseph Chandler and Elizabeth Thomas 
(Moore) Grave, the former a native of Wayne county. The father 
was born on the old Grave homestead, in Wayne township, Jan. 
2(>, 1824. In 1851 he purchased a farm west of While Water, and 
this continued to operate and reside upon up to the time of his de- 
mise, Feb. 15, 1898. His devoted wife passed away March 2, 
1885, the mother of six children. Her parents were natives of the 
State of Delaware. The Grave family came originally from Eng- 
land and the hrst American ancestors came to these shores in 1645. 
Jacob Grave, the paternal grandfather, came from the State of 
Delaware to Wayne county, in 1816, and settled where the city of 
Richmond now stands. He had been a tailor by trade in Wil- 
mington, Del., but after coming to Indiana -purchased land and 
followed farming the residue of his life, dying in April, 1862. His 
wife, Anna (Stroude) Grave, was also a native of Delaware and 
they were married in that State. Nathan Grave received his 
schooling in the district schools of White Water and at the White 
Water Academy, which he attended three winters, dividing his 
early days between the school room and his father's farm, and at 
a tender age learned the lesson of self-dependence. As he has 
resided upon a farm during the greater portion of his days he has 
practically been reared in the agricultural industry. He knows the 
"ins and outs" of the business "from A to Z," and has been very 
successful as a follower of this, his chosen calling. After his mar- 
riage he remained on the home farm one year and then purchased 
a small farm north of White Water, where he resided three years 
and then traded that tract for a part of the old home place. Three 
or four years later, in February, 1879, he engaged in the general 
mercantile business at White Water and was so employed twelve 
years, at the end of which period he purchased the place where he 
resides and has since been engaged in farming. He is liberal in 
his religious views and has never allied himself with any denomina- 
tion. In politics he is a loyal member of the Republican party and 
in 1908 was elected trustee of Franklin township. On Aug. 27, 
1870, Mr. Grave was married to Miss Sarah Ann Blose, daughter 
of Henry and Anna Pdose, of Franklin township. The Blose fam- 
ily came from Germany to Pennsylvania and thence to Warren 
county, Ohio, and Mrs. Grave's father came to Wayne county in 
1822. He was a farmer by occupation, was liberal and generous, 
and won a line reputation for his business ability, settling many 
estates and serving as guardian of many children. He died Feb. 
21, 1885. Mr. Grave has served as treasurer and superintendent 
of the Cemetery Association at White Water, and has been a 
Master Mason for over forty years. To him and his devoted wife 
have been born six children: Barbara Emilo, born July 23, 1871, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 503 

died in infancy; Early C, born Sept. 3, 1872, resides at the parental 
home; Dessie Cleora, born Nov. 1, 1874, is the wife of Edgar E. 
Jordan, of Richmond; Erne Afton, born Sept. 18, 1876, is the wife 
of Samuel Glunt, of Webster; Zora May, born Oct. 29, 1878, has 
been a school teacher at White AVater the past twelve years ; and 
Anna Elizabeth, born Feb. 18, 1884, is the wife of Jesse Glunt. 

John Elwood Gibbs, a prominent and influential farmer of 
Franklin, is a native of Kansas, born in Osage county, that State. 
Jan. 31, 1875. His father, Jacob Marcellus Gibbs, is a native of 
Ohio, Lorn in 1847. Soon after the close of the Civil war he re- 
moved to Kansas, where he resided about twenty-two years and 
then came to Wayne count}-, locating in Franklin township, at 
White Water. The mother of John E., of this review, and whose 
maiden name was Emily Jane Radford, was born in Randolph 
county, Indiana, her parents having come from North Carolina. 
She and her husband became the parents of four children — Ida, 
Minnie, John E. and Emma — the last one named being deceased. 
Ida married Dr. A. II. Jones, of White Water, and they have two 
children — Deskin and Gaylord ; and Minnie resides at the parental 
home. The paternal grandfather was David Gibbs, who came from 
North Carolina to Ohio in an early day. John E. Gibbs acquired 
his educational training in the district schools of his native county 
in Kansas and those of Franklin township, this count)-, and has 
always followed agricultural pursuits, in which he has been very 
successful. In politics he has been affiliated with the Democratic 
party since becoming a voter, and he was reared in the faith of the 
Campbellite church. For a number of years he has been a mem- 
ber of the Masonic lodge at White Water. At the age of sixteen 
years he began his independent career by working on farms by the 
month, and this he continued until married, lie then rented a farm 
in Darke county, Ohio, where he resided three years, at the end 
of which time he rented a farm in Randolph count)', Indiana, and 
resided there two years. In 1910 he purchased the farm of seventy- 
seven acres where he resides, in Franklin township. On Nov. 20, 
1903, he was married to Mary Virginia Nossett, daughter of Cal- 
vin and Sarah Elizabeth (Gummer) Nossett, natives of Shenandoah 
count)-, Virginia. The)- removed to Ohio in 1875, and from there 
came to Wayne county in 1896. The father has followed farming 
all of his life and also has engaged to some extent at the shoe- 
maker's trade, and resides in Franklin township. The mother died 
Dec. 12, 1910. Mrs. Gibbs was born Nov. 30, 1877. She and her 
husband are the parents of three children: Velma Chrystal, born 
Oct. 23, 1904; Bryant Calvin, born Feb. 12, 1908; and Arthur Mar- 
cellus, born June 22, 1910. 

William Branson Barton, a prominent and influential farmer 
of Franklin and Wayne townships, is a native of "Wayne township, 
born on the old Barton homestead, June 11, 1865. His father, 
Daniel Boone Barton, was born in Franklin township, Sept. 22, 
1837, and worked on his father's farm until married, with the ex- 
ception of one year, which he spent in Iowa, lie was married in 
i860 to Catherine Elena Cox, daughter of Jeremiah, Jr., and Keturah 



504 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

1). Cox, of near Middle-borough. After his marriage lie commenced 
farming near Bartonia, in Randolph county, and resided there until 
the spring" of 1865, when lie moved back to the old home farm in 
Wayne township, the farm on which the subject of this review now 
resides, a part of it being in Franklin and part in Wayne township. 
There he continued to make his domicile until he retired, in 1903, 
and his death occurred Feb. 9, 1908. After his death his wife, born 
Nov. 30, 1844, removed to the city of Richmond, where she resides, 
at a ripe old age, hale and hearty. Five children were born to her 
and her husband: E. Leona, deceased wife of 'J nomas C. Voorhees, 
of Webster township; William B. is the second in order of birth; 
Keturah Evelena is the wife of George Reid, of Richmond; Elrriina 
C. is the wife of K. D. Cotield, of Franklin township; and Florence 
J. L. died in infancy. The paternal grandfather was William Bar- 
ton, a native of Man-land who came to Franklin township in the 
early part of the last century. The subject of this review was 
reared on the old Barton farm and acquired his education in the 
district schools of Wayne township, after which he took a course 
in a business college, under John K. Beck, graduating Feb. 23, 1885. 
Farming has always been his chief occupation, though he was 
offered and refused a position as bookkeeper after completing his 
business course. Politically he has always been an active and en- 
thusiastic member of the Republican party, but has not acquired 
the habit of seeking public office. However, he has served as road 
supervisor, member of the township advisory board, and as county 
pike superintendent. Concerning religious matters he and his wife 
are members of the Christian church at White Water. On March 
12, 1887, ' ie was united in matrimony to Emma White, daughter of 
William G. and Annie (Anderson) White, of Franklin township, 
and of this union have been born eight children: Iva Pearl, born 
Jan. 4, 18S8, died July 27, 1905; Kenneth Merle, born Aug. 11, 1890, 
is a student in the State University, taking the medical course, 
with the class of 1915; William Ray, born Jan. 22, 1893, graduated 
in the common schools, received a scholarship for the short course 
at Purdue University, and resides at the parental home; Anna 
Catherine, born July 16, 1895, is a student in the Richmond High 
School with the class of 1913, and makes her home with her grand- 
mother, Elena (Cox) Barton, at 223 North Sixteenth street; Emma 
Marie, born April 22, 1898; Grace Margrette, born Aug. 21, 1901 ; 
Wayne Hanly, born Oct. 12, 1904; and Helen Louise;, born Dec. 4, 
1910. After his marriage Mr. Barton removed to Middleborough, 
where he farmed and teamed six months, and then removed to 
Pleasant Hill, Preble county, Ohio. Nine months later he removed 
to his father's farm, which he operated until 1891, and then moved 
to a farm northwest of White Water, which tract consisted of 148 
acres. Fie resided there until 1902, when he removed to White 
Water, to enjoy its superior school advantages, purchasing the 
Addleman farm, opposite the school grounds. He resided there- 
until April, 1908, when, his father having died, he returned to the 
old home place, where he has since resided. Mrs. Barton was born 
in Franklin township, June 13, 1867. Mr. Barton has been a rhem- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 505 

ber of the Knights of Pythias lodge, No. 322, at Fountain City, 
for the past fifteen years. To the parents of Mrs. Barton were 
born ten children, of whom Eva, Cora L., and Earner are deceased; 
Emma is the wife of Air. Barton; Tessa May is the wife of Charles 
Blose, of Franklin township; Manford Lee married Estella Jacpia 
and resides in Franklin township; Mabel is the wife of Clarence R. 
Hough, of Franklin township; Frederick G. graduated at the Indi- 
ana University and the Harvard Law School and is associated with 
the firm of Gardner & Jessup, attorneys, of Richmond; Libert 
Eldon resides in Richmond, and Mary in Franklin township. 

Erastus Mortimer Stetler, for upwards of live years an enter- 
prising and influential fanner of the township of Franklin, and 
for some time incumbent of the office of member of the township 
advisory board, is a native of Indiana. He first beheld the light 
of day on a farm near Lynn, in Randolph county, July 1, 1865, a 
son of Joseph and Sarah (Elliott) Stetler, natives of Indiana. The 
father was born in Wayne county, in 1829. All of his days were 
passed in his native State, and his widow resides in Richmond. The 
paternal grandfather was J esse Stetler, a native of Pennsylvania, 
who came to Richmond as a young man and followed the trade of 
shoemaking". The maternal grandfather was Miles Elliott, a na- 
tive of North Carolina. Joseph Stetler, the father, died in 1888, 
and he and his devoted wife were the parents of six children: 
Fannie M. died at the age of seven years; Erastus M. ; William I). 
is the freight agent on the Cotton Belt Line at Dallas, Tex.; Inda 
L. is the wife of Albertus G. Parker, of Richmond; Charles E. is an 
operator for the Western Union Telegraph Company at Houston, 
Tex. ; and ( )mer K. is a druggist at Waco, Tex. The subject of this 
review was educated in the district schools of his native count)- and 
at the village of Lynn, attending until he was about twenty years 
old, working on his father's farm in the meantime. He remained 
at the parental home until 1891, when he rented his father's farm 
and operated it until 1906, when he purchased the farm in Franklin 
township where he has since continued to reside. He has continued 
to make the best of permanent improvements upon his place and 
on every side are evidences of enterprise, thrift and prosperity. 
He is held in unqualified esteem in the community, and while he 
has never sought nor held public office, other than that of member 
of the township advisory board, he takes a great interest in public 
affairs and is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican 
party. The religious views of himself and wife are expressed by 
membership in the Christian church. He is an active member of 
the Knights of Pythias lodge, No. 119, at Lynn. Mr. Stetler was 
united in marriage to Miss Hannah Throckmorton, Jan. 3, 1891, 
daughter of John (deceased) and Abigail Throckmorton, many 
years residents of Randolph county, the latter now residing at 
Lynn. Of this happy marital union of Erastus M. Stetler and wife 
have been born three children: Byron, born Sept. 12, 1893; 
Yvonna A., born April 7, 1898; and Willodene, born July 22, 1904. 
Mrs. Stetler is the eighth in a family of nine children, four of 
whom are living. 



506 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Thomas Jefferson Addleman, for many years a prominent and 
influential farmer in the township of Franklin, Wayne county, for 
some time the incumbent of the office of school director, and promi- 
nent in Sunday school work, having been president of the Wayne 
County Sunday School Association two years, is a native of the 
Hoosier State, lie was born in Franklin township, Wayne county, 
Indiana, July 6, 1850, a son of Joseph Pierce and Catherine (Town- 
send) Addleman, the former a native of the State of Pennsylvania. 
The first American ancestor was John Michael Addleman, who 
came to America from Sondereith, Germany, in 1750. Joseph Ad- 
dleman, great-grandfather of Thomas )., came from Pennsylvania 
in the spring of 1828 and purchased the old Addleman homestead 
in Franklin township. John Michael Addleman, the grandfather, 
also came at about the same time and purchased land northwest 
of White Water. The father, Joseph P. Addleman, born in 1821, 
was but seven years old when he accompanied his parents to Indi- 
ana, and Catherine (Townsend) Addleman, the mother, was a 
daughter of Jesse and Eleanor Townsend. They became the par- 
ents of six children. Thomas J. Addleman acquired his education 
in the schools of his native township and in the academy at White 
Water, which he attended two terms. At the age of twenty he 
began teaching and taught two terms in the Pleasant Run school 
and one term in the Kemp school, working on the home farm dur- 
ing vacations. Since then he has been actively engaged in farm- 
ing. In politics he is a Republican, though he has not fostered as- 
pirations for public office. Concerning religious questions, he is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Middleborough. On 
March 20, 1873, he was united in matrimony to Miss Lydia Haw- 
kins, daughter of William and Sarah Hawkins, for many years be- 
fore their demise residents of Wayne township, where Mrs. Addle- 
man vvas born, May 4, 1852. tier father died April 23, 1887, and 
her mother on Sept. 3, 1888. The happy marital union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Addleman has been blessed by the birth of five children: 
Leota Mabel, born Feb. 9, 1874, is the wife of Oliver Hodgin, of 
Preble county, Ohio, and they have four children — Howard, Esther, 
Ilarley, and Leonard; Viola Catherine, born Feb. 6, 1875, is the 
wife of Jesse Bailey, of Richmond, and they have one child — Ray- 
mond ; Sarah Estella, born Nov. 28, 1877, is the wife of Everett 
P>ennett, of Richmond; Leonora, born April 12, 1883, is the widow 
of Merritt Harris; and Naomi C, born March 15, 1887, died Aug. 
8, 189S. Mr. Addleman was for many years a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 261, and passed through 
the chairs of the local organization. 

Leroy Nichols is another of the native sons of Indiana who 
has attained to success as a follower of agricultural pursuits, being 
one of the prosperous and representative farmers of Franklin town- 
ship. He was born in Rush county, Indiana, son of Harrison and 
Emeline (Simmonds) Nichols (see sketch of Harrison Nichols). 
He came to Wayne county with his parents, in October, 1875, and 
was reared on the old farmstead, early becoming inured to, the 
strenuous labor involved in its improvement and cultivation, in 






BIOGRAPHICAL 507 



the meanwhile duly availing himself of the educational advantages 
of the district schools of the community, He has continued to 
make fanning his chief occupation, devoting his attention to gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits and being recognized as a trustworthy 
and enterprising business man, entirely worthy of the confidence 
and esteem so freely accorded him. lie is public-spirited and a 
stanch supporter of the cause and principles of the Democratic 
party, though not a seeker of public office. Air. Nichols is not 
affiliated with any religious organization, being broad minded and 
liberal in his views on religion, and his wife is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Chester. On Nov. 27, 1891, he was 
united in holy wedlock to Miss Jennie Huffman, born Jan. 12, 1876, 
daughter of Solomon and Mary (Strife) I lulTman, residents of 
Hamilton county, Ohio, for many years prior to their removal to 
Wayne county, in 1881, the father being a farmer. The happy 
union of Leroy Nichols and wife has been blessed by the birth of 
one child, Mary Alice, born Nov. 16, 1903. Solomon Huffman, 
father of Mrs. Nichols, was born in Butler county, Ohio, April 18, 
1841, son of Tobias and Mary Huffman. His wife, Mary (Strife) 
Huffman, is a native of White Oak, Hamilton county, Ohio, and 
was orphaned at an early age. Her father was George Strife, a 
native of Germany, who followed farming in Ohio, and to him 
and his wife were born four children: George, a resident of Cin- 
cincinnati; Mary, the mother of Mrs. Nichols; Louis, and William, 
the latter being deceased. Solomon [•luff-man followed farming 
during all of his active career, and as before mentioned came to 
Wayne county in 1881. To him and his wife were born live chil- 
dren: Charles is a farmer in Wayne township; Mrs. Nichols is 
the second in order of birth ; and Aaron, Walter, and Jacob died in 
early manhood. Mr. Huffman is a member of the Christian church 
and his wife has membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Politically, Mr. Huffman is a Republican. 

William Henry Wesler, for many years a well known and in- 
fluential farmer of Franklin, first beheld the light of day on the 
old Wesler homestead in that township, Sept. 22, 1859, son of 
John Conkle and Mary (Davis) Wesler, natives of the Hoosier 
Slate The paternal grandfather was Thomas Wesler, born on 
the old Wesler homestead at Valley Forge, Pa., the farm being 
the same as that upon which Washington's army encamped dur- 
ing that long and dreary winter of the Revolutionary war. He 
married Susan Conkle, of Philadelphia, and came to Wayne county, 
where he spent the residue of his life. The father was born in 
Wayne county, Sept. 12, 1836, and died there on Sept. 10, 1910. 
He was twice married, his first wife being Mary Davis, of which 
union there were born four children, and the second wife was 
Anna Parish, of which union there were born three children. Wil- 
liam 11. Wesler acquired his education in the Wesler district 
school in Franklin township, dividing the days of his early youth 
between the school room and his father's farm, and at an early age 
learned the lesson of hard work and self-dependence. His mother 
died when he was sixteen years old, and he thereafter made his 



50& MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

home with his grandfather W.esler until married. Later he pur- 
chased a farm in the community in which he was reared and from 
that day to this has successfully followed agricultural pursuits, lie 
is allied with the Republican party, though he has never been 
an office seeker. On Nov. 4, 1881, he was united in matrimony to 
Miss Nettie McFerren, daughter of John McFerren, a native of 
Kentucky, and of this union were born three children — Maiw, Roy, 
and Virginia. The mother of these children died Nov. 6, 1906, ami 
on Nov. 22, 1908, Mr. W'esler married Eva Davis, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Mary Davis, man)' years residents of Wayne county. Mr. 
and Mrs. W'esler are both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Chester. The daughter, Mary, is the wife of Frank 
Warfel, of Richmond; Roy married Edna Hilbcrt and resides at 
San Monica, Cab, and Virginia resides at the parental home. 

Rufus Clay Newman, now a resident of Franklin township, but 
for a i.umber of years a prominent and influential agriculturist of 
Wayne township, first beheld the light of day at the home of his 
parents, in Jasper count)', Indiana, Oct. 22, i860, son of John 
William and Mary Frances (Larsh) Newman. The paternal grand- 
father was Vincent Newman, a native of Virginia who came to 
Union count)', Indiana, in carl)' life ami devoted the remainder of 
his days there to agricultural pursuits. John William Newman, 
the father, was born in Union county, May 9, 1838. lie has always 
followed farming and resides one and one-half miles northeast of 
New Paris, in Preble county, Ohio. The maternal grandparents 
were Leroy and Elizabeth Larsh. Rufus C. Newman received his 
schooling in the public schools of the city of Richmond. In 1885 
he went to Labette county, Kansas, where he attended school two 
or three years and then worked on a farm until 1893, when he re- 
turned to Wayne county. Hence he became familiar with the 
farming industry very early in life, an occupation which he has 
pursiud with success up to the present time. J 11 politics he is ac- 
tively affiliated with the Republican part)-, though he has never 
sought public office. Fraternally he was at one time a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Richmond, but is not 
now affiliated. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Chester. On Jan. 22, 1896, he was united in holy wed- 
lock to Miss Lurana Raper, daughter of John and Eliza Ann Raper, 
residents of Wayne township many years and both are deceased. 
This happy marital union has been blessed by the birth of two sons: 
Ernest Raper, born Feb. 4, 1898; and Willard Earl, born May 13, 
1902, died Feb. 9, 1907. To John William and Mary Frances 
(Larsh) Newman, parents of Rufus C, there were born six chil- 
dren, of whom two are deceased. Those living are Rufus C. ; Jessie 
Bell, wife of Liza Whitney, of Twin Falls, Idaho; Harry, a farmer 
in Boston township, Wayne county ; and Grace, wife of 0. M. Scott,, 
a merchant at Sioux City, Iowa. To John and Eliza Ann Raper, 
parents of Mrs. Newman, there were born seven children: Susie 
is deceased; Frank is a resident of Richmond; Mrs. Newman is the 
next in order of birth; Effie is the wife of Harry Newman ; % and. 
Jasper, Rufus, and Leslie reside in Richmond. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 509 

Joseph Howard Thomas, a prominent and influential citizen 
of Franklin township, this county, was born at the old Thomas 
homestead in that township, Oct. 25, 1863. His father, John West 
Thomas, a native of the same place, burn Dec. 16, 1821, married 
Elizabeth McPherson, mother of the subject of this review, and a 
native of New Paris, Ohio. Their entire wedded life was spent 
on the old home farm, where the father died Feb. 6, 1S97, and the 
mother died in 1880. The mother was a daughter of James and 
Hannah McPherson, and bore her husband twelve children. Joseph 
11. acquired his elementary education in the old W'esler district 
school, which he attended until about eighteen or nineteen years 
old, working" on the farm in the meantime. Since his marriage he 
has been successfully engaged in farming, and has put the place in 
modern shape. lie is a Republican politically, though be has never 
sought public office, lie and his wife are both devout and enthu- 
siastic members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Middle- 
borough. On Dec. 16, 1S80, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss 
Keturah Derth Showalter, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Townsend) Showalter, residents of Wayne county for many years, 
both now deceased. Of this happy union there is a son, Clyde 
Augustus, born Aug. 29, 1887, who married Myrtle Allen, ami they 
have a daughter, llazel Olive, born Oct. 4, 1909, ami a son, YVillard 
Earl, born Oct. 1, 191 1. After his marriage Mr. Thomas worked 
by the month for Allen Harris, in Clay township, one year; then 
operated the Taylor farm two and one-half years, ami since the 
end of that period has conducted the operations on the old home 
place. The father of Mrs. Thomas was born in Virginia and her 
mother was born in Wayne count)'. Mrs. Thomas is the fifth in a 
family of eight children, the others being Nancy, deceased; Judith 
E., wife of Frank Thomas, of Fountain City; Samuel J., of Ran- 
dolph county ; Christina, deceased ; Catherine, deceased ; George, 
of Fountian City; and Elizabeth, wife of Horace Throckmorton, 
of Fountain City. 

Marshall Samuel Smith, a prosperous and highly respected 
agriculturist of Franklin township, is a native of Delaware county, 
Indiana, born Oct. 24, 1855, son of Jonathan and Cynthia ( Leeka) 
Smith. His paternal grandparents were natives respectively of 
Virginia and Scotland. His father was born in the Buckeye State, 
near Lebanon, Sept. 12, 1818, and when a young man migrated to 
Indiana and took up government land in Blackford county. He 
was a farmer and flour and grist miller by occupation and erected 
a mill on White river. The mother of Marshall S. Smith, Cynthia 
(Leeka) Smith, was also a native of the Buckeye State, born near 
Wilmington, July 14, 1S22, and her parents — George and Elizabeth 
Leeka — were natives of Pennsylvania, the Leekas originally com- 
ing from Germany. Marshall S. Smith received his educational 
training in the district schools of Randolph county, attending two 
or three months in winter and working on the farm the remainder 
of the time. He continued thus until fourteen years old, when he 
commenced working as a farm hand by the month, continuing s,o 
employed until twenty-live years old. He then worked in an oil 



5IO MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

mill at Richmond nine months, and then was employed on the 
Wabash railroad abont three and one-half years. At the end of 
this period he returned to Richmond and was employed as engi- 
neer at the Wayne Works seven years. In 1892 he purchased his 
present farm of eighty-five and one-half acres, upon which he 
erected a new house and barn and there has since resided, with the 
exception of the years 1908-09, when he rented the farm to another 
and resided in Fountain City. In politics he is allied with the 
Democratitc party, but has never been a seeker of public office. 
In his religious views he is very liberal, and though a Christian, 
has never been affiliated with any religious denomination. His 
wife is a member (if the Fountain City Quaker Meeting. On Oct. 
30, 1890, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Elizabeth (Decker) 
Sheffer, daughter of Henry and Henrietta Decker, who came from 
Germany about 1852 and located in Richmond, where the mother 
died Dec. 22, 1890, and the father on Jan. 19, 1891. Airs. Smith is 
one of nine children born to her parents, and was born in Rich- 
mond, April 20, 1854. Of this family three sons and four daughters 
are living. Air. Smith is one of thirteen children born to his par- 
ents, and of this family there are live sons and two daughters liv- 
ing. There have been no children born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, 
but by her former marriage, to George W. Sheffer, of Preble coun- 
ty, Ohio, Dec. 25, 1877, Airs. Smith is the mother of two — a son 
and a daughter. The son, Orville W. Sheffer, born Nov. 27, 1882, 
died Oct. 28, 1907; and the daughter, Octavia, born Feb. 1, 1884, 
is the wife of Andrew Riley, of Franklin township, of which union 
there have been born four children — Robert, Marshall (died in 
1906), Pauline, and George W. For many years Mr. Smith was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 2A7, 
at Spartanburg, and at different times tilled various offices in the 
local organization. Aside from his homestead, Air. Smith owns the 
old Laughlin place of eighty-two acres, in Franklin township, and 
193 acres in Green's Fork township, Randolph county. 

Albert Burton Carman, one of Franklin township's highly es- 
teemed agriculturists, has been a resident of Franklin township the 
past decade, lie, like a large majority of the residents in this sec- 
tion of the commonwealth, is a native of the lloosicr Slate, and 
was born in Franklin county, Indiana, Jul)' 11, 1870. His paternal 
grandfather was John Burton Carman, a native of Maryland. His 
parents were George B. and Caroline (Hegg) Carman, the latter a 
native of Germany and the former a farmer by occupation. To 
them were born two sons — Edward W., born March 4, 1868, and 
Albeit B. The father died in 1872, when his son, Albert 1>., was 
two years old. After the death of the father the mother married 
John ii. Carman, a brother of her former husband and they reside 
on the Chester pike, in Wayne township. The subject of this rec 
orcl was reared to the sturdy discipline of rural life and at a tender 
age acquired the lessons of hard work and self-reliance. At the 
same time he gained an intimate knowledge of farming, which has 
been his occupation a number of years. He lived on a farm until 
nineteen years old, during the last three years of that time working 



BIOGRAPHICAL 5 I I 

as a farm hand by the month. He then secured employment in a 
carpet factory in Richmond, and in 1897 went to Elwood, Ind., 
where he worked in a tin plate mill one year. He then hired out 
to Abner Bulla for over a year on Mr. Bulla's farm in Wayne 
township, and also attended to Mr. Bulla's milk trade, after which 
he bought Mr. Bulla's dairy route, which he operated over a year. 
lie then-removed to Centerville, where he conducted a butcher shop 
one year, after which he did bridge carpenter work several months. 
He then rented Jonathan White's farm, where he resided tine year, 
and then purchased property in Chester, in 1902, ami resided there 
seven years. During a part of this time he was engaged at the 
Hoosier shop in Richmond, and the last four years were spent in 
operating a dairy, selling milk in Richmond. In 1909 he purchased 
the farm which he occupies and upon which he remodelled the resi- 
dence and built a new barn. It is a very productive farm, consist- 
ing of eighty acres, and the new buildings adorn and add to its 
value and attractiveness. Mr. Carman sold this farm in i<;i 1, with 
the intention, however, of remaining in Wayne county. Air. Car- 
man is a loyal and public-spirited citizen and is a Republican in 
politics. On April 10, 189S, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Berthelya Iliatt, a native of Franklin township, born west of 
Bethel, Jan. 1, 1874, daughter of William and Lydia (Gist) Iliatt, 
who have been residents of Franklin township many years. This 
happy marital union has been blessed by the birth of three chil- 
dren — a son and two daughters: Bonnie Laverne, born Feb. 17, 
1899; Lydia Blanche, born Sept. 7, 1901, and George Stanley, born 
Aug. 7, 1904, died April 19, 1906. Mrs. Carman is a member of the 
Christian Church at White Water. William and Lydia (Gist) 
Iliatt, parents of Mrs. Carman, were born in Franklin township and 
the)' are the parents of four children: Orley F., Everett ]., Mary 
B., and Russell S. 

Vernon Reynolds, for many years one of the leading citizens of 
Williamsburg, first beheld the light of day on his uncle's farm, one 
and one-half miles northeast of that village, July 8, 1848. His 
father, Joseph Fowler Reynolds, a native of New Jersey, migrated 
westward to Wayne count}' in 1832, in company with his parents — 
Samuel and Rebecca (Jeffrie) Reynolds — who settled on a farm in 
New Garden township. Joseph F., the father of Vernon, was one 
of eight children born to his parents, the others being John and 
Samuel (twins), Firman, Jesse, George, Elizabeth, and David. 
He learned the shoemaker's trade and followed that occupation 
throughout his active career in Williamsburg, lie was twice mar- 
ried, first to Elizabeth Brittain, a native of New Jersey, who bore 
him three children, among whom was Vernon, of this sketch, the 
others being Daniel F. and Charity, who died young. The first wife 
died in 1851, and the father then married Amy Brittain, a sister of 
Elizabeth Brittain, of which union there were nine children — Emma, 
Frank, Katharine, Fletcher, Charles, Asher, Taylor, and Ernest, 
and one that died in infancy. Vernon Reynolds received his edu- 
cation in the schools at Williamsburg and Green's Fork, attending 
until about sixteen years old. He learned the shoemaker's trade 6f 



512 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

his grandfather, Joseph Brittain, and in 1865 commenced working 
for himself at the old tanyard building at Williamsburg-, where he 
remained three years. He then opened a shoe shop at his present 
location in Williamsburg, buying the property soon thereafter and 
has been engaged in business at that place ever since, conducting 
a harness and shoe store. Politically he is actively affiliated with 
the Republican party. On Sept. 29, 1871, Mr. Reynolds was united 
in holy wedlock to Mary Ann Hutchins, daughter of Thomas and 
Letitia (Veal) Hutchins, the family having come from North Caro- 
lina, and of this union there was a son, Raymond V., born Jan. 19, 
1884, and died Jan. 21, 1901. The father of Letitia Veal was Enos 
Veal, who came to Indiana from New Jersey, and the mother was 
Mary BrunsWorth, born in Pennsylvania. 

Lewis E. Hahn, who died at his home in Cambridge City, 
Nov. 13, 1907, was a worthy scion of one of the honored pioneer 
families of Franklin county, Indiana, and left upon the annals of 
his adopted city a definite and beneficent impress. Here he passed 
a goodly portion of his long and useful life, which was ordered upon 
the loftiest plane of integrity and honor, so that in passing to the 
life eternal lie left the heritage of a name unsullied and one which 
will be held in lasting esteem by all who came within the sphere of 
his influence. Lewis E. Hahn was born in Metamora, Franklin 
county, Indiana, April 22, 1842, and the place of his nativity was 
the family homestead in that village. He was a son of Archibald 
and Ann (Case) Hahn, the former a native of the old Empire State 
of the Union and the latter was born in Franklin county, Indi- 
ana. The father was a man of strong individuality and sterling 
character and was prominent and influential as a citizen, both in 
the pioneer days and in the later years of advanced prosperity. 
Lewis E. Hahn, subject of this memoir, spent his boyhood days in 
his native village and his educational advantages were those afford- 
ed in the schools of that place. He was the oldest of three chil- 
dren born to his parents, all of whom are deceased, the others 
being Wilber and Lucy. As a youth he began working for his 
father, a drygoods merchant in Metamora, and continued in that 
employ until the death of his father, when he assumed the manage- 
ment of the business, in which it was his to attain to marked suc- 
cess. In 1880 he removed to Cambridge City and in partnership 
with his father-in-law, Samuel B. Trembly, engaged in the dry- 
goods business, and this association continued until 1892, when 
Mr. Trembly died. Mr. Hahn then continued the business alone 
until 1005, when he disposed of his interests to Morris & Krahl, 
but until his death maintained his home in Cambridge City, where 
he purchased the beautiful residence property now occupied by his 
widow. Mr. Hahn ever wielded an influence for good in all the 
relations of life and was naturally a leader in all affairs in which 
he was interested. His political allegiance was given to the Re- 
publican party, in whose cause he rendered effective service, and 
lie was a generous supporter of the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Cambridge City. His kindliness and helpfulness gained for him in- 
violable friendships and his death was deeply mourned by all' who 




LEWIS E. HAHN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 5 I 3 

had known the man and had recognition of his noble attributes of 
character. His widow still resides in Cambridge City and is a 
leader in the social life of the community. She is a woman of gra- 
cious refinement and her beautiful home is a center of generous 
hospitality. In early life Mr. Ilahn gave four years of his vigorous 
manhood to the preservation of the Union in the time of its sore 
need, enlisting as a private in the Eighteenth Indiana infantry. 
This regiment was organized at Indianapolis and was mustered in 
Aug. 16, 1861, for three years. It left the State the next day for 
St. Louis and accompanied Fremont into Missouri. On its return 
it moved with Pope's army to the Blackwater and aided in the 
capture of a large number of prisoners. In February, 1802, it 
marched to Cross Hollow, Ark., and in an engagement near Lees- 
ville in March its brigade saved another from capture, the Eight- 
eenth recapturing the guns of the Peoria artillery. The regiment 
participated in the advance at Elkhorn Tavern, when the enemy 
was forced from the field, and then marched for Helena, Ark., be- 
ing engaged at Cotton Plant early in July and reaching Helena on 
the 13th. On Oct. II it moved for Southeastern Missouri, where it 
passed the winter, and was transferred to Grant's army in the 
spring of 1863, participating in the engagement at Grand Gulf. At 
Port Gibson it captured a stand of colors and some artillery; was 
engaged at Champion's Hill, Black River Bridge, and at Vicksburg 
from May 19 until its fall, being in the assault on the enemy's 
works and the first to carry its colors to the parapet It was in 
the Bayou Teche campaign and other operations in Louisiana dur- 
ing the fall, and on Nov.' 12 embarked for Texas. It was engaged 
at & Mustang Island, and in the attack on Fort Esperanza. It re- 
enlisted at Indianola in January, 1864, and was furloughed home, 
stopping at Baton Rouge to aid in repelling a force about to attack 
the garrison there. It was ordered to Virginia in July, joined 
General Butler's forces at Bermuda Hundred, and was engaged in 
several severe skirmishes at Deep Bottom. It was then trans- 
ferred to Washington and assigned to the Second division, Nine- 
teenth corps, which joined Sheridan's army in Virginia. It partici- 
pated in the battle of Opequan, aided in the defeat of Early at 
Fisher's Hill, fought at Cedar Creek, took transports for Savan- 
nah, Ga., I an. 6, 1865, and was engaged three months 111 budding 
fortifications. It was detached May 3 and sent to Augusta, (.a., 
raising the Stars and Stripes over the arsenal for the first time since 
the beginning of the war. It returned to Savannah on June 7, was 
sent to the southern part of the State, and was mustered out Aug. 
28 1S65. Mr. Ilahn contributed his full share to this glorious rec- 
ord and until his death bore an honorable scar from a wound re- 
ceived in the service. On Dec. 24. 1877. in Metamora, Franklin 
county, Indiana, was solemnized the marriage of Mr Ilahn to 
Miss Emma Frances Trembly, a daughter of Samuel h and Ll- 
mira (Francis) Trembly, the former bom in Brownsville ;, IncL, 
and the latter in New Jersey. Samuel B. Tremblv 



early life, but later engaged in the mercant 



■ss, and he and 



his wife were honored residents of Cambridge City from 1880 until 



5H MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

their deaths. He passed away Nov. 14, 1892, at the age of sixty- 
eight years, and her death occurred Nov. 30, 1909. They became 
the parents of five children, of whom the second in point of birth 
is Mrs. Emma F. Hahn, widow of the subject of this memoir. 
Carrie V., the eldest, is the wife of Reverend Murray; Jeffie Ver- 
milyea resides in New York City, and Maude and Judge are de- 
ceased. 

Addison St. Myer, for many years a carpenter and also a pros- 
perous agriculturist in Green township, was born in that town- 
ship, three miles northwest of Williamsburg, lie was born March 
11, 1858, son of Samuel and Charlotte (Study) St. Myer, and is one 
of two children born to these parents. His paternal great-grand- 
father, George St. Myer, was born in Virginia and emigrated to 
Warren county, Ohio, with his family. His son, John St. Myer, 
was born in Virginia, Jan. 14, 1799, and came to Wayne county, 
Indiana, in 1826, settling" on the farm where he lived out the resi- 
due of his life, and where his son Samuel was born Sept. 25; 1838. 
His wife was Nellie Swords, a native of Tennessee. Samuel St. 
Myer, father of Addison, lived on the old homestead forty years, 
until 1878, when he removed to Williamsburg" and engaged in the 
grocery business until 1890, when he moved to Seattle, Wash., and 
engaged in the wholesale commission business. His first marriage 
was to Charlotte Study, born Oct. 28, 1839, on a farm two and one- 
half miles northwest of Williamsburg. They were married in Sep- 
tember, 1S56, and the wife died May 22, 1879, the mother of two 
children: Addison, and Charles, who was born Oct. 18. 1859, an( l 
resides in Seattle, Wash. The second marriage of Samuel Si. Myer 
was on Nov. 17, 1880, to Wildy Cranor, and of this union there is 
a daughter, Nellie, born Dec. 10, 1891. The maternal grandfather 
of Addison St. Myer was Joseph Study, born in Maryland and 
came to Indiana in 1828, entering the land where Mrs. St. Myer 
was born, and there he spent the residue of his life, dying in 1881. 
lie was twice married. J lis first wife was Hannah Way and of that 
union were bom eight children, of whom two died young and the 
others were John, Elizabeth, Sarah Ann, Matilda, Charlotte, and 
Washington, who lived to maturity. The second marriage of Jo 
seph Study was to Elizabeth Hutchins and of this union there was 
a daughter, Mary. Joseph Study died Aug. 1, 1904, and his widow- 
resides at the old homestead, which has been her home for the past 
fifty years. Addison St. Myer acquired his educational training in 
the district schools of Green township, also attending three terms 
at the Williamsburg school, and worked upon his parents' and 
neighboring farms until sixteen years of age. He then com- 
menced to work at the carpenter trade at Economy. In 1878 he 
went to Kansas, where he worked on a cattle ranch until 1880, 
and then returned to Williamsburg. He followed the carpenter 
trade until 1889, when he was appointed postmaster at Williams- 
burg by President Harrison, serving in that position until 1893. 
He then was engaged in the grocery and hotel business until 1895, 
when he returned to carpenter work and followed that occupation 
until 1900, when he purchased a farm and followed agricultural 



BIOGRAPHICAL 515 

pursuits two years. In 1900 he was elected trustee of Green town- 
ship and served in that position until Dec. 31, 1904. On Dec. 15, 
1905, he was again appointed postmaster at Williamsburg and is 
still the incumbent of that position. In politics he is active in Re- 
publican circles, and concerning religious matters entertains very 
liberal views and is not affiliated with any particular denomination. 
On Sept. 4, 1877, he was united in marriage to Mary Jane York, 
daughter of Thomas G. and Mar}- (Marine) York, of Randolph 
count) - , and of this union there are two children: Victor, horn <. >ct! 
10, 1881, married Maude 'White, resides in Williamsburg, and they 
have three children — Lee, Ralph, and Dale; and Carl, born Dec. 
JO, 1886, resides in Williamsburg. The wife died on Dec. 28, 
1892, and on Aug. 14, [893, Mr. St. Myer married Miss Matlie 
Study, daughter of Jesse and Jane Study, of Wayne county. 

William A. Lewis is one of those energetic and progressive in- 
dividuals who have attained success in agricultural pursuits and is 
numbered among the prosperous and popular citizens of Green 
township, lie is a native of that township, horn on the old Lewis 
homestead, Oct. 16, 1851, a son of Allen W. and Lucy T. (Uollings- 
worth) Lewis. The Lewis family is of Welsh-English extraction 
and. as the old traditions have it, was founded in the I'nited States 
during the Colonial days by several brothers, one of whom settled 
in North Carolina, and from him the subject of this narrative de- 
scended. Allen W. Lewis was the youngest of twelve children born 
to John and Sarah (Roukman) Lewis. One of the elder sons, 
Richard, who was married and had several children, accompanied 
the parents when they came to Green township, in 1811, having 
spent the winter in Cincinnati, Ohio, then a village. The two fami- 
lies located near each other. An unbroken forest covered this sec- 
tion and Indians and wild beasts were numerous. During the fear- 
ful wars waged between the red men and the white settlers about 
the time of the war of 1812, when Tecumseh and his brother, called 
the Prophet, tried in vain to turn the tide of the Anglo-Saxon civili- 
zation which threatened their rights, the Lewis family seemed pe- 
culiarly exempt from molestation. They had always treated the 
Indians kindly and received similar treatment in return. Indeed, 
some of the red men who lived in the neighborhood of John Lewis 
went to him and requested him to wear a broad-rimmed hat, which, 
they said, would insure him protection from their race, and it is 
needless to say that he lost no time in agreeing to do as they ad- 
vised. The land upon which he located, and where he ultimately 
developed an excellent farm, is still in possession of his descendants, 
as is the original (.\i-cd thereto, as issued by the government and 
signed by President James Madison, under date of May 27, 1816. 
The land is thus described: "The northeast quarter of section 7, 
township 17, range 14 east of the second principal meridian." An- 
other government deed to land owned by John Lewis is thus de- 
scribed: "The southwest quarter of section 8, township 17, range 
14 east of the second principal meridian." This deed is dated Feb. 
21, 1817, and hears the signature of Madison, who was still Presi-' 
dent at that time. After he had accomplished more than the ordi- 



516 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

nary man, twice told, John Lewis was summoned to his reward at 
the old homestead which had been his abiding place for many long 
years. His death occurred May 4, 1848, and that of his wife had 
taken place but a few months before, Sept. 20, 1847. The old home- 
stead which he had ably assisted in clearing and improving was 
inherited by Allen YV. Lewis, the father of William A. Allen VV. 
Lewis, a native of North Carolina, first beheld the light of day in 
Randolph county, that State, June 14, 1809, and was but one year 
old when the family removed to Indiana. He tenderly cared for 
his parents during their declining years, performing his entire 
duty toward them, as he always did to every one who, in any wise, 
looked to him for help or protection. He was domestic in his 
.tastes and had no greater pleasure than to make his home beautiful 
or improve his property in some manner. Generous and hospitable 
to a fault, he loved to entertain friends ami neighbors, and the poor 
and needy found him kind and sympathetic. In all of his business 
dealings his course in life was remarkably upright and just and no 
one had reason to complain of him in this respect. Blessed with a 
liberal vein of humor, he looked upon the bright and happy side of 
things and brought cheer wherever he went. Loved and sincerely 
mourned by the entire community, he entered the silent land, Feb. 
13, 1895. The marriage of Allen \Y. Lewis and Miss Lucy T. Ilol- 
lingsworth was solemnized May 23, 1839. She was born in Union 
district. South Carolina, Jan. 31, 1817, daughter of Aquilla and 
Tamer ( Kenworthy) Hollingsworth. The father died when she 
was about eleven years old, and in 1829 she came to Wayne county 
with her mother. Two sons and six daughters were born to Allen 
W. Lewis and his estimable wife: John died in infancy and Frances 
H. when about five years of age; Nancy married Larkin T. Loud; 
Naomi is the wife of Benjamin Beverlin; Rebecca is Mrs. John Mil- 
ton Harris; Sarah is the next in order of birth; William A. is the 
subject of this review; and Luzena Medora is the wife of William 
11. Jones. William A. Lewis acquired his educational training in 
the public graded schools and the high school at Williamsburg. 
After his marriage his father gave him 160 acres of land, located 
one and one-half miles northeast of Williamsburg, and be resided 
there from February, 1873, until December, 1007, engaged in gen- 
eral farming. By hard work ami good management he became in- 
dependent and made the best of improvements on his place. On 
every side are evidences of thrift and prosperity. Upon leaving the 
farm he removed to Williamsburg, where he has since resided. In 
February, i<-)oy, the First National Bank of Williamsburg was or- 
ganized and Mr. Lewis was chosen president of the institution, 
a position lie is still the incumbent of. From 1891 to 1898 he was 
associated with Morton F. Edwards in a general store in Williams- 
burg, and he has served as Ditch Commissioner for Wayne county 
during the past four years. He is held in high esteem in the com- 
munity, and while he has never fostered any personal ambition for 
public office, takes a great interest in public affairs and is a stanch 
supporter of the "Grand Old Party." lie is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, having joined Acasia Lodge, Mo. 242, at Greenes Fork, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 5 1 7 

in 1873, but the following year transferred his membership to Wil- 
liamsburg Lodge, No. 493, and in 1910 he became a member of 
Richmond Lodge, No. 649, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. In January, 1873, ^ r - Lewis was united in holy" matrimony 
to Miss Ella C. Edwards, daughter of Thomas and Jane (Study) 
Edwards, the former born in Wales, and the latter a daughter of 
William and Harriett (Stigall) Study, was born in Green township, 
Wayne count)-, Indiana. The father was a millwright by occupa- 
tion and built the Williamsburg mill, one at Green's Fork, and the. 
St. Louis mills, between Green's Fork and Williamsburg, Mrs. 
Lewis was born in Williamsburg, Feb. 7, 1854, and of her union 
to Mr. Lewis were born two children — Edith, who is the wife of 
Clarence Pitts, and Paul E., who graduated at Earlham College and 
is now engaged in the general mercantile business in Williamsburg. 
Dor Cuykendall, an industrious ami successful miller of Wil- 
liamsburg, is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Crawford coun- 
ty, Ohio, Nov. 29, 1847. The paternal grandfather, John Cuyken- 
dall, was born in New York State and came to Ohio about 1816, 
entering the land on which his son William was born, His death 
occurred in itijj, and his wife preceded him, dying in 1871. His 
father, William Cuykendall, was a native of Ohio and a miller by 
occupation, and the mother, Alzina I Ross) Cuykendall, was also 
born in the State of Ohio. The father died Sept. 19, 10,10, and the 
mother on May 5, 1S57. The father then married' .Matilda Miller 
and they had two children: Henry, who resides in Wichita, Kan., 
and Jennie (deceased) became the wife of John Conklin, and they 
had one child, Charley. Dor Cuykendall acquired his educational 
training in the schools at Plymouth, Ohio, dividing his earl)' days 
between the school room and his father's mill, thus learning at a 
tender age the lessons of arduous labor and self-reliance, at the 
same time acquiring a practical knowledge of milling. At the age 
of seventeen he enlisted as a private in Company G of the One 
Hundred and Ninety-first Ohio infantry for service in the Civil 
war. This regiment was organized in the State of Ohio at large in 
January and February, 1865, to serve one year. It left Columbus 
on the day of its organization under orders to proceed to Winches- 
ter, Ya., and report to Major-General Hancock, then organizing the 
First corps at that place. At Harper's Ferry the regiment was 
halted by command of General Hancock and ordered to report to 
Gen. John K. Brooke, by whom it was assigned to the Second bri- 
gade, Second division, Army of the Shenandoah. Its only service 
was garrison duty in the valley, marching as far .south as Win- 
chester, where it remained until Aug. 27, 18O5, when it was mus- 
tered out in accordance with orders from the War Department. 
Mr. Cuykendall then returned to the home of his parents, who were 
living in Huron count)', Ohio, and worked in his father's mill eight 
or ten years. In May, 1880, he removed to Wayne count)', Indiana, 
and located north of Richmond, where he operated the Crawford 
mill until it burned, about 1883. He then .moved to Richmond, 
where he worked in the Rush mill until r886, when he purchased 
the mill at Williamsburg, where he has since resided. Thus it will 



5lS MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

be seen that he has continued to follow milling throughout all of 
his business career and has always met with success in this, his 
life's vocation. On Nov. 22, 1869, he was united in marriage with 
Mary Ellen Connell, daughter of George and Mary (Chamberlin) 
Council, of Richland county, Ohio, and of this union were born two 
children — Dessa and Katharina — the last named being the wife uf 
Harry Sheppard, and they have two children — Francis and Richard 
\V. Dessa resides at the parental home. Mr. Cuykendall is a mem- 
ber uf Chinkorror Lodge, No. 120, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and also of Williamsburg Lodge, No. 193, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and has passed through the chairs of the local organization 
of the first named fraternity. Politically he is a Republican. 

John Davis, a thrifty farmer and a scion of pioneer families 
of Wayne county, now living retired in Williamsburg, was born on 
his father's farm, one-half mile north of that village, in Green town- 
ship, April 2, 1845. He is a son of Drewry and Susannah 
f.Hutcheris) Davis, born in Wayne county, the father in 1823 and 
the mother in 1820, and the respective families came from North 
Carolina. John Davis is one of five children born to his parents. 
He enjoyed the limited scholastic advantages afforded by the dis- 
trict schools of his boyhood days and the schools of Green town- 
ship and Williamsburg, which he attended until March, 1864, and 
then, seized with a martial enthusiasm, enlisted as a private in the 
Fifty-seventh Indiana infantry for service in the Civil war. With 
his regiment he joined the Fourth corps, May 5, and took part in 
the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, 
Adairsville, Allatoona, New Hope Church, and in the heavy skir- 
mishes about Kenesaw Mountain. In the assault of June 27 the 
regiment formed the skirmish line in front of the assaulting column 
of the Fourth corps; was on the skirmish line at Peachtree Creek; 
was then in the trenches before Atlanta until Aug. 25, and was en- 
gaged at Jonesboro. It accompanied its division to Chattanooga, 
took part in driving Hood into Alabama, and was with Thomas' 
army which resisted the enemy's invasion of Tennessee. It was en- 
gaged at Franklin, where Mr. Davis was wounded, and was in the 
battle of Nashville, after which it moved to lluntsville, Ala., in pur- 
suit of Hood, remaining there until spring. It moved into Tennes- 
see in April, 1865, proceeding from Hull's Gap to Nashville, in July 
was transferred to Texas, being stationed at Port Lavaca, and was 
mustered out Dec. 14, 1865. Mr. Davis participated with signal 
valor in all of the engagements in which the regiment was involved, 
from the time of enlistment until mustered out with the other mem- 
bers. After the cessation of hostilities he returned home and at- 
tended a district school a short time, and then worked on his 
father's farm until married. After his marriage he remained on the 
farm two years, renting the same of his father, and then purchased 
eighty acres of land of his father, located in the southwest corner 
of Green township. Moving to that farm, he resided there thirty- 
one years, successfully conducting a general farming business and 
devoting himself to no one particular branch of the science. In 
1901 he removed to his present home in Williamsburg and has since 



BIOGRAPHICAL 519 

lived practically retired. In his political relations Mr. Davis is 
unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican party, but has 
never been an aspirant for public office, and he is identified with the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 159, at Williamsburg, and the Grand 
Army of the Republic, Post No. 90, at the same place, lie is a 
stockholder in the banks at Williamsburg, Green's Fork and Econ- 
omy. In February, 1868, was solemnized Mr. Davis' marriage to 
Miss Emma Roberts, daughter of Elias and Susannah Roberts, of 
Wayne county, and five children were the issue of this union : Cora 
died in infancy; Charles married Katharine Bird and they have four 
children— Everett, Edith, Clyde, and Alice; Ella married Charles 
Johnson, of Randolph county, and they have two children — Lena 
and Roy; Nettie married Fred Gunckel, and they have one child, 
Ora; and Harry C. married Grace Kelley, of Franklin county, and 
they have a son, Basil. Mrs. Davis died March 21, 1004. 

Leander Anderson, for many years a well known and highly 
esteemed citizen of Wayne county, is a native of this county, born 
near Bethel, July 29, 1848. His paternal grandparents were Na- 
than and Elizabeth (Portlier) Anderson, natives of Kentucky. His 
father, William Anderson, first beheld the light of da)- in Kentucky, 
and the mother, Lucinda (Harlan) Anderson, was a native of the 
same State. They immigrated to Wayne county about 1819 and 
located near Bethel, where the father entered eighty acres of land, 
which he continued to reside on and cultivate the residue of his 
active career and up to the time of his demise, in 1888. He and his 
devoted wife were the parents of eight children — five sons ami 
three daughters — Elihu, Mary, Martha, Samuel, Jacob, John, Anna, 
and Leander. The subject of this sketch received his educational 
training in the district school at Bethel, which he attended until 
eighteen years old. While not engaged with his studies he as- 
sisted his parents about the farm and thus became familiar with 
the "ins and outs" of farming at an early age, and for years con- 
tinued to make this his chief occupation. He continued on the old 
home place the greater part of the time until 1890, when he removed 
to Richmond and lived in retirement eight months. He then re- 
moved to Bethel, where he resided four years, engaged in the buy- 
ing and selling of live stock, shipping hogs, etc., ami then pur- 
chased a farm on the Arha pike and moved to it in 1894, still con- 
tinuing the buying and shipping of live stock. In 1900 he removed 
to Madison, Ohio, where he purchased a half interest in the grain 
elevators, but after eight months there sold out and returned to 
Bethel. In 1902 he purchased the elevator at Williamsburg, and 
in 1903 built the one at Economy, both of which he continues to 
operate. In 1903 he removed to Economy, but in 1908 established 
his home in Williamsburg, where he has since continued to reside. 
Politically Mr. Anderson is affiliated with the Republican party, 
though he has never sought public office. On May 21, 1870, he was 
married to Virginia Heironimus, daughter of John C. and Mary J. 
Heironimus, natives of Virginia, who removed to Darke county, 
Ohio, where Mrs. Anderson was born. Of this union there were 
bom two children: Mabel, born Dec. 18, 1872, died at the age of 



520 .MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

five months, and Ethel, born Sept. 5, 1874, was married on Sept. 16, 
1893, to William E. Hollingsworth, and she died Nov. 15, 1908, hav- 
ing become the mother of four children — Lucinda, Shirley, Virginia 
(deceased), and Marjorie. 

Milton H. Woolley, fur many years a prominent citizen of Wil- 
liamsburg, first beheld the light of day in Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 
28, 1851. His father, Reuben 11. Woolley, was a native of New Jer- 
sey, born Feb. 17, 1812. At the age of sixteen he went to New 
York City, as a maker of grates, and afterward removed to Cin- 
cinnati, where he engaged in the same business until 1865. In April, 
1866, he removed to Green township, this county, where, in part- 
nership with William Campbell, he conducted a saw mill at Wil- 
liamsburg until the time of his death, in July, 1899. The mother, 
Martha J. (Wagoner) Woolley, was also a native of the State of 
New Jersey, born June 28, 1817. She passed to the Great Beyond, 
Aug. 7, 1903, at the advanced age of eighty-six years, the mother 
of ten children. The paternal grandfather was Abram Woolley, 
while the maternal grandsire was William Wagoner, both natives 
of New Jersey, where the former lived out his allotted days, and the 
latter died in Illinois. Milton II. Woolley acquired his education in 
the public schools of Cincinnati, attending until about fourteen 
years old. In April, 1866, he came to Williamsburg, where he 
served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith trade with Reichter 
Brothers and Elias Roberts. After working at the trade three years 
he was compelled to give it up owing to a physical weakness and 
then learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed ten or twelve 
years. Later he.purchased a saw mill and has since been connected 
with the lumber business, meeting with success as a follower of that 
industry. In connection with his lumber business he lias quite an 
extensive plumbing and pump establishment, and also does insur- 
ance and notary work. Politically he is an ardent Democrat, for 
four years in the early '80s was the incumbent of the office of jus- 
tice of the peace, and in 1906 was the Democratic candidate for 
State Senator, being beaten by only 160 votes in a district that is 
overwhelmingly Republican. On Dec. 24, 1873, he was married to 
Mary Yelvington, daughter of Thomas and' Mildred (Hollings- 
worth) Yelvington. Mrs. Woolley's paternal grandparents came 
from North Carolina to Wayne county and her father was born 
while enroute through Tennessee, lie was named Thomas Nathan 
Knox Yelvington, Knox county being the place of his birth. He 
was born in 1819 and died at Williamsburg, April 30, 1855, when 
Mrs. Woolley was six months old. Her mother was born Feb. 15, 
1822, daughter of Pierce and Martha Hollingsworth, natives of 
North Carolina. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Woolley were born 
nine children: Mildred, born Aug. 17, 1875, married Leonidas 
Martin and they have five children; Echo, born Jan. 31, 1878; Mar- 
tha, born Sept. 5, 18X0, died Dec. 12, of the same year; Reuben, 
born May 5, 1882, died Dec. 20, 1883; Leota, born Oct. 8, 1884, mar- 
ried Denver Coggshall ; Ruford Horton, born Aug. 3, 1887, married 
Mary Davis; Lovicia, born March 24, 1890; Marie, bom Aug/ 18, 
1892; and Asher Donald, born Oct. 15, 1897. Mr. Woolley is a 



IOGRAPIIICAL 5_'I 



member of Williamsburg Lodge, No. 193, Free ami Accepted Ma- 
sons; Chinkorror Lodge, No. 120, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; and Williamsburg Lodge, No. 459, Knights of Pythias, at 
Williamsburg, and has gone through the chairs in each of the last 
two named organizations. 

William Elmer Brown, one of the prosperous merchants of 
Green township, and whose general grocery store is at Williams- 
burg, was born in Tipton county, Indiana, July 30, 1806. lie is a 
son of George W. and Mary (Smith) Brown, the former born in 
Grayson county, Virginia, and the latter was a native of Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. The father came to Wayne county in the 
early '30s, later purchased a farm east of Centerville and followed 
the occupation of farming all of his life. He and his wife became 
the parents of nine children. William E. Brown received his pri- 
mary education in the schools at West Grove, in Center township, 
which he attended until nineteen years old. After completing his 
scholastic training he became engaged in agricultural pursuits, in 
which he met distinct and exceptional success. lie did not 
devote himself to any one especial branch of the science, but de- 
voted his land to the cultivation of general products. After his 
marriage, in 1889, he rented a farm in Abington township, where 
he resided until 1891, and then removed to Fayette county, where 
he farmed eight years. lie then returned to Wayne county, first 
locating in Jackson township, but later came to Green township, 
where he rented a farm west of Williamsburg and resided ten 
years, engaged in general farming. He gave up his farm interests 
in April, 1910, and engaged in the general grocery business in Wil- 
liamsburg. He has been unswerving in his allegiance to the men 
and principles of the Republican party and as the successful candi- 
date of that organization is now serving as trustee of Green town- 
ship. Fraternally he is prominently identified with the Masonic 
lodge, No. 493, at Williamsburg, and is also an active worker in 
Cambridge City Lodge, No. 9, Knights of Pythias. On Dec. 25, 
1889, Mr. Brown was married to Elmeda Wagner, daughter of 
Anion and Dorothy Wagner, of Washington township. 

William Harrison Jones, for many years an active follower of 
agricultural pursuits in Wayne county, residing in the township of 
Green, is a native of the Iloosier State, born on the old Jones home- 
stead, one mile north of Centerville, June 23, 1851. His father, C)li- 
ver T. Jones, a native of Virginia, was born Sept. 19, 1810, son of 
Levi M. and Mary (Thomas) Jones, natives of the Old Dominion. 
(See sketch of Lincoln II. Jones for ancestral history.) William II. 
Jones received his schooling in the district schools of Center town- 
ship and the schools of Centerville, and also attended Earlham Col- 
lege, and he remained on the home farm until twenty-four years old. 
In 1875 he purchased the farm where he resides in Green town- 
ship and that place has been the scene of his long and enterprising 
career. In politics he is a member of the Republican part)'. On 
Feb. 10, 187^, he was united in holy matrimony t<> Miss Luzena 
Medora Lewis, daughter of Allen W. and Lucy T. ( I Collingsworth) 
Lewis, of Green township (see sketch of William A. Lewis). Mrs. 



522 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Jones was born Oct. 7, ] 855- Of this union were born three chil- 
dren: Echo, burn March 19, 1883, married John Ernsberger and 
resides two miles south of Green's Fork ; Guv Wert, born Sept. 
20, 1886, is the manager of a branch office of Morse & Company, 
of Chicago, wholesalers of candies, with headquarters at Detroit, 
Mich., and Aletha Glee, born Sept. 28, 1894, ' s a student in the Wil- 
liamsburg High School. 

Robert Edward Shute is a resident of Green township, where 
he is having a successful career as an agriculturist. He is the third 
in a family of four children born to James Morrison and Sarah 
(Ford) Shute and was born at Casey, 111., Feb. 16, 1868. Of the 
other children two died in youth, and Lulu is the wife of John P. 
Myers, of Dayton, Ohio, and they have two children — Salina and 
Catherine. The paternal grandparents were Robert and Mary 
(Clark) Shute, the former a native of New Jersey, where he served 
as county surveyor, and the latter was born in Pennsylvania. The 
father was born at West Alexandria, Ohio, in 1838, and the mother 
in Manchester, England. The former was a blacksmith by vocation 
during his active career and now resides at Fountain City. He and 
his wife were the parents of four children. Robert E. Shute re- 
moved with his parents to Campbellstown, Ohio, when very young, 
took advantage of the educational opportunities afforded by the 
schools of that place, and at the age of thirteen or fourteen years 
removed with his parents to Lynn. A number of years afterward 
they removed to Fountain City. For a time Robert F. worked at 
Commons' dairy and then worked as a farm hand by the month. 
He managed, by the practice of frugality and economy, to purchase 
the farm of eighty acres where he now resides, in 1896, to the man- 
agement of which he devotes his whole attention, lie has improved 
the placC by a new dwelling and other buildings and devotes his 
attention to general farming. Although he has given stanch suit- 
port to the Republican party, he has never sought public preferment 
for himself. He is allied with no church or sect, believing that the 
standard of righteous living is not set down by the tenets of any 
faith. On March 20, 1895, was solemnized Mr. Shute's marriage to 
Miss Martha Sheffer, a daughter of John M. and Sarah M. Sheffer 
(see sketch of John M. Sheffer). Two children have blessed this 
union — Leslie Myron, born April 5, 1898, and Dorothy May, born 
Jan. 10, 1902. Mrs. Shute was born in Wayne county, June 24, 

1873- 

John Martin Sheffer was born in Boston township, Wayne 
county, Indiana, Dec. 31, J 840. His paternal grandparents were 
Daniel and Mary Shelter, who came from near Richmond, Va., to 
Indiana, in the early part of the last century and entered land in 
Boston township, this county, where they spent the residue of their 
lives. The parents were Jacob and Mary (Stanley) Sheffer, the 
former born on the old homestead, in Boston township, April 22, 
1814. He was a farmer all of his active career, served a number 
of years as township trustee, and died in 1901. The mother was a 
daughter of Zachariah Stanley. She was born July 2, 1817, anddied 
Nov. 15, 1900. John M. Sheffer was married lo Rebecca Miller, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 523 

daughter of William and Mary Miller, Oct. 2, 18C2. She died Nov. 
10, 1869, leaving two children: Emma, born Aug. 22, 1864, married 
Clem Oler, and resides in Preble county, Ohio; and Minnie, born 
June 11, 1867, married Frank Feasel, of Boston township. On Oct. 
13, 1870, Mr. Sheffer married Sarah A. Bond, widow of Enos Bond 
and daughter of William C. and Sarah (Ilogsett) Blakemore, of 
Augusta county, Virginia, where her parents died. She was born 
in Virginia, April 5, 1845, an( ^ came to Indiana with two brothers, 
a sister and a brother-in-law, in 1863, the family sympathizing with 
the North in the Civil war that was then in progress. Of the union 
of Mr. Sheffer and his second wife were born lour children: Lulu 
Belle, burn July 31, 1871, married Dr. Bert McWhinney, of Camp- 
bellstown, Ohio; Martha E., born June 24, 1873, married Robert E. 
Shut'e (see sketch); Margaret, born June 2^,, 1878. married Elbert 
Colvin, of Richmond; ami Jacob V., born Aug. 28, 1886, married 
Nellie Wise, of Clay township, and also resides in Richmond. Mr. 
Shelter's early life was spent under the parental roof and in the 
district schools of Boston township. After his first marriage he 
rented a farm in Roston township two years, and then purchased a 
farm in the same township. Two years later he sold that tract and 
purchased 177 acres of land on the Straight Line Tike, live miles 
south of Richmond. Alter the death of his first wife he broke up 
housekeeping and operated his father's farm until after his second 
marriage. He then removed to his present residence in Webster 
township, where he operates 160 acres of prairie land. He is mod- 
ern in his methods and has made much improvement in the way of 
buildings, etc., and devotes his attention to general farming. Mr. 
Sheffer is a Republican in his political views. 

George Washington Stiggleman, a prosperous farmer and a 
man of consequence in his community, now living retired, was 
born on the old Caleb Jackson farm on the National road, in Wayne 
county, March 26, 1838. The place of his birth was known as Jack- 
son's Hill, and the house was a log cabin of the primitive pioneer 
type, with stick and mud chimney, the jambs and hearth being of 
clay. His paternal grandfather was Philip Stiggleman, a Virginian 
by birth, who lived out his career and died in the Old Dominion. 
The grandmother, Margaret Stiggleman, died Aug. 13, 1841, at the 
age of seventy-two years. The father, also named Philip Stiggle- 
man, was a native of Floyd county, Virginia, and served as a sol- 
dier from that State in the war of 1812, reaching the rank of major. 
He was a millwright and miller by occupation and about 181 5 came 
to Indiana, accompanied by his widowed mother, locating at Cen- 
terville, but afterward removing to Abington, where he followed 
his trade. He organized the first company of volunteers for the 
Civil war at Abington, but was too old to enter the service himself, 
and he died on May 20, 1862. He was married to Susan Forkner, 
of Wayne county, born in North Carolina, Aug. 18, 1802, and she 
died Oct. 19, 1883. She was a woman of excellent traits of char- 
acter and a devoted wife and mother. She and her husband were 
the parents of twelve children: Perry, John, and Andrew Jackson 
are deceased; Lewis Hamilton married Sarah Wolf and is deceased, 



524 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

his widow residing in Richmond; Mary Ann became the wife of 
Thomas Pritchett and is deceased; Samuel Milton resides six miles 
north of Elwood, Ind. ; Nancy is the widow of David Brumfield and 
resides in Elwood, Ind.; George W. is the next in order of birth; 
Lydia Ellen resides near Abington ; James Monroe died at the age 
of twenty years, and two died in infancy. George W. Stiggleman 
was educated in the district schools of Abington township, which 
he attended until fourteen or fifteen years old. llis early business 
training was with his father in the mill, but he also devoted a por- 
tion of his youthful days to work on a farm. In [864 he enlisted as 
a private in Company A of the One Hundred and Thirty-third In- 
diana infantry for service in the Civil war. This regiment was or- 
ganized in May, 1864, nine companies being raised in the Seventh 
Congressional district and one at Richmond in the Fifth district. 
It was mustered in May 17 and left the State at once for Tennessee. 
It was mustered -out in August, 1864. Mr. Stiggleman followed 
farming during all of his active career, with the exception of two 
years when he resided in Abington, and his farming operations were 
carried on in Wayne county, with the exception of a short time in 
Preble count}-, Ohio, and the years 1878-79-80, when he farmed in 
Huntington comity, Indiana, lie finally purchased forty acres of 
land in Green township, but about nine years ago he retired from 
active labor. He is a Democrat in his political views, but has had 
no time aside from his bus)' life on the farm to devote to things 
political. He is well informed on general topics, an interesting 
conversationalist, and a man of strict integrity and sterling worth. 
On Dec. 14, 1865, he was married to Rosella Otilla Bean, a daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth II (Evans) Bean, the former bom on 
Jan. 17, 1816, and died Nov. 29, 1891, and the latter was bout Nov. 
3, 1824, and died March 12, 191 1. Mr. and Mrs. Bean were married 
Dec. 8, 1842, and became the parents of one son and six daughters: 
Rosella Otilla is the wife of Mr. Stiggleman; Amy Adclla is the 
widow of Robert Estep and resides in Traverse City, Mich.; Oli- 
ver Horace was born Oct. 13, 1846, and died Feb. 15, 1854; Georgi- 
anna Catherine is the wife of Frank Moorman, of Cambridge City; 
Mary Emily is the wife of Cyrus lb Quigg, of Green township; and 
Nena Elizabeth is the wife of Marcus Reynolds, of Webster town- 
ship. Joseph Evans, maternal grandfather of Mrs. Stiggleman, was 
born Feb.. 3, 1707, and his wife, Amy Hormel, was born Oct. 12, 
1804. Joseph Evans died Sept. 2, 1851, and his wife passed away, 
April 29, 1835. The parents of Mrs. Stiggleman removed from 
Warren count)', Ohio, to Wayne count)', in November, 1850, and 
took up their residence in a log cabin, with stick chimney, their 
farm being located six miles north of Centerville, in Green township. 
The farm on which they lived was that entered by Mr. P>ean's 
father-in-law, Joseph Evans, and there Mr. and Mrs. Bean both 
died. To Mr. and Mrs. Stiggleman were born two children: Sam- 
uel J., born Sept. 29, 1866, married Mary Paddock, of Preble county, 
Ohio, and they have three children — John Elston, William Ernest, 
and Thelma Musetta Elizabeth; and Ada Estella, born June, 15, 
1872, married Ambrose Wilson, of Preble count), Ohio, and they 



BIOGRAPHICAL 525 

have one child, George Harold. Mr. Stiggleman is a member of 
the Baptist church at Salem, and lie was a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows for twenty-five years. Mrs. Stiggle- 
man was a member of the Rebekahs. 

William Henry Craig, one of the prosperous farmers of Green 
township and a man of prominence and character, was born in 
Marion county, Indiana, Sept. 30, 1863. His paternal grandparents 
were Amos \Y. and Rachel (Lackey) Craig, the former bom in 
New Jersey, July 18, 1818, and died July 22, 1889. The great-grand- 
parents came from New Jersey and the Lackeys were from Ohio. 
The grandfather was a fanner in Marion count)-, Indiana, and he 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. The grand- 
mother was born in Ohio, Nov. 28, 1820, and died Jan. 14, 1866. 
The maternal grandparents of William 11. Craig were Henry and 
Anna Beaver, the former born in North Carolina, July 21, 1796, 
and died in Hamilton county, Indiana, Dec. 12, 1874, and the latter 
was born in Ohio, June 27, 1811, and died in Hamilton county, 
Indiana, March 8, 1870. The parents of William H. Craig are 
Thomas L. and Joanna (Beaver) Craig, the former born in Ham- 
ilton count}-, Indiana, March 31, 1840, and the latter was born July 
6, 1845, am ' died Aug. 31, 1878. To them were born six children, 
of whom William 11. is the eldest; Amos Newton is a farmer in 
Preble county, Ohio; James Albert is a farmer in Hamilton county, 
Indiana; Marshall Lllis resides in Lynn, Randolph county, Indiana; 
and Otto and Walt, twins, died in infancy. After the death of his 
first wife Thomas L.. Craig was married to Miss Mollie Ilollenback, 
of Hamilton county, Indiana, and of this union were born four chil- 
dren, of which the first one died in infancy; Walter is a farmer in 
Hamilton county; and Emma and Thomas reside at the parental 
home. Thomas L. Craig was a long time resident of Marion coun- 
ty, Indiana, but now resides in Hamilton county. He is a Democrat 
in his political views and h Ls religious faith is in the Lutheran 
church. William II. Craig was educated at the district schools in 
Hamilton county, which he attended until fifteen years old. When 
his mother died he commenced work as a farm hand by the month, 
being thus employed until married. He then worked one year by 
the month in Preble county, Ohio, ami then moved to a farm south 
of Richmond, where he resided nine years. In 1896 he purchased 
his present farm of eighty acres, and in 1906 built thereon a beau- 
tiful residence. Other and extensive improvements have been made 
on this homestead and he continues to manage and operate this 
farm, devoting considerable attention to stock raising, but his farm 
is conducted along general lines. In politics he is a Democrat and 
is looked upon as one of the first citizens of his community. On 
Jan. 4, 1887, was celebrated his union in matrimony to Miss Ella 
Olive Windsor, born in Preble county, Ohio, Jan. 15, 1859, and of 
this union two children were born: Portia Josephine, born May 15, 
iXKS, is the wife of Roy Williams, a farmer in Webster township, 
to whom she was married April 6, [910; and Horace Darwin, born 
June (), 1891, resides at the parental home. John l'ettis Windsor, 
the father of Mrs. Craig, was born in North Carolina, Jan. 16, 1829, 



526 MEMOIRS OP WAYNE COUNTY 

and died Nov. 2, 1877. Lydia (Gard) Windsor, her mother, was 
born in Union county, Indiana, May 17, 1833, and died June 13, 1881. 
These parents were married March 3, 1858, and to them were born 
five children, of whom Mrs. Craig is the eldest; Emma Malinda, 
burn Nov. 12, i860, died Dec. 31, 1887; Miriam Evangeline, born 
Nov. 9, 1862, is the wife of Dr. John A. Walls, of Richmond (see 
sketch) ; Lillie Forrest, born July 17, 1864, is the wife of Benjamin 
F. Harris, of Richmond; and Charles Anderson died in infancy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Windsor were married in Preble county, Ohio, .and 
he followed farming all of his life, the last lour years being spent 
in Wayne county, Indiana, where he died, llis widow then re- 
turned to Preble count)', Ohio, and spent the last years of her life 
there with her mother. 

Addison H. Harris is a prosperous farmer of Green township, 
although during his active career he has been interested in various 
oilier profitable industries, and is now living in quiet retirement, 
lie was born in Wayne township, this count)', April 18, 1826, son of 
Benjamin and Lydia (lliatt) Harris. The paternal grandfather, 
also named Benjamin Harris, came from North Carolina to Indi- 
ana about 1800, entered land north of Richmond, and there spent 
the residue of his life, dying in the '40s. The father was born in 
North Carolina, in 1797, and as a child came to Indiana with his 
parents. In 1828 he removed to the farm of r6o acres he had pur- 
chased in Green township, and which is now occupied by his son, 
Addison 11., and there built the comfortable and substantial brick- 
residence which is still occupied, residing therein until his death, 
which occurred in 1894. The mother, born in Virginia, came with 
her parents to Randolph county, Indiana. Addison 11. Harris is one 
of ten children born to his parents. He was two years old when 
the family removed to Green township and has lived there nearly all 
of his life. He worked on the home farm until twenty-four years 
old and then, in the spring of 1850, went overland to Oregon and 
thence to the gold fields of California, where he remained three 
years, lie returned by the Nicaragua route and endured all of the 
vicissitudes of the dangerous journey. Soon thereafter he went to 
Iowa and purchased a section of land which he held three or four 
years, and then disposed of it. He conducted a general store at 
Webster and at Fountain City, in all about twelve years, and was 
engaged in the mercantile business at Winchester three years. 
Upon disposing of his mercantile interests he removed to a farm 
of 1G0 acres which he had purchased in Green township, located 
southeast of his present place, and during the succeeding twenty 
years was successfully and lucratively engaged in the management 
of it. In 1890 he came to his father's old homestead, where he has 
since resided. On July 14, 1859, Mr. Harris was united in marriage 
to Miss Adeline Woods, daughter of Smith and Nancy (Medaris) 
Woods. Mr. Woods was killed at the Hollingsworth Mills by a 
falling tree. To Mr. and Mrs. Harris were born eight children: 
Elizabeth is the wife of Harvey Borten, of Richmond, and they 
have one child, Alice; James, a farmer in Center township, married 
Otie Cheesman and they have two children — Frederick and Amy; 



BIOGRAPHICAL 527 

William, a farmer in Center township, married Nora Kirkman ; 
Charles resides in Richmond ; Rolla resides at home and has charge 
of the farm; Belle is the wife of Howard Dryant, an electrician at 
Richmond, and has three children — Edith, Mildred, and Alary A.; 
Odessa is the wife of Atwood Pitts, a farmer in New Garden town- 
ship, and the}' have two children — Vera and Ruth; and Frank A., 
a carpenter in Richmond, married Mattie Martin. Mr. Harris' only 
fraternal relations have been with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he was a member several years, lie is inde- 
pendent in his political views and for twenty years, while residing 
in New Garden township, served as justice of the peace. Mis wife 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Williamsburg. 

George Frazer is well known in the agricultural circles of 
Wayne county, lie was born on the place where he resides, in 
Green township, June 5, 1856, a son of James and Maria (Johnson) 
Frazer, the former born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 6, 178C, and the 
latter in I hitler county, Ohio, Aug. 8, 1817. The paternal grand- 
father was Paul Frazer, a member of the Frazer clan in Scotland, 
who came to America in 1775 as a British soldier for service in the 
Revolutionary war. lie left the army in Pennsylvania, married 
Jane McPherson, and lived for a time in Philadelphia. He later 
removed to 1 lollidaysburg, Pa., and there lived the remainder of his 
life. To him and his wife the following children were born: Alex- 
ander, Simon, Paul, and James, the last named of whom became the 
father of George Frazer. James Frazer was reared ami educated in 
his native State. There he was first married to Margaret Wertz, of 
which union there were no children, and after her death he married 
Martha Somerville, of which union was born the late Judge James 
S. Frazer, of Warsaw, I rid. (see sketch). The second wife having 
died in Pennsylvania, in 1837 James Frazer and his brother, Raul, 
came to Indiana and located in Green township, this county, where 
the third marriage of James was solemnized, lie and his brother, 
Paul, purchased the farm which George Frazer now occupies, the 
tract being purchased of Abel Lomax. James afterward purchased 
Paul's interest in the farm and there was actively engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until he passed away at about the close of the 
Civil war, secure in the high regard of all who knew him. His 
brother, Paul, located on a farm southeast of Centerville, where he 
died. He married a Miss McCord in Pennsylvania, and of this 
union were born four sons — Paul, John, Frank, and McCord — the 
first two named being deceased and Frank and McCord reside in 
Centerville. The second marriage of their father was to Mary 
Radd, and of this union there was born a daughter, Catherine, wdio 
resides at Centerville with her brothers. James Frazer was a man 
of fine intellectuality and was influential in public afifairs of a local 
nature. Of his third marriage there were born five children: Mar- 
tha died unmarried; Joseph served in the Sixty-ninth Indiana infan- 
try in the Civil war and died of disease in a hospital at Raton 
Rouge, La.; Anna married Josiah Knight, of New Garden township, 
and died in 1903 ; Simon is deceased, and George is the youngest of 
the family. George Frazer is indebted to the district schools of, 



528 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Green township, to the Spiceland Academy, and to the Valparaiso 
Normal for his early educational training. lie taught school for a 
time and continued to he associated in the work and management 
of the home farm, where he has continued to reside up to the present 
time, lie has made the best of improvements on the farm, has kept 
it up to a high state of cultivation, and is recognized as a leader in 
that most important branch of industry. Mr. Frazer is a member 
of the Friends' church, as was also his wife. Sept. 9, 1885, bore rec- 
ord of his marriage to Miss Carrie Williams, daughter of Jacob and 
Catherine (Pearson) Williams, of New Garden township, where 
Mrs. Frazer was born Sept. 27, 1861. She died Dec. 22, 1903, hav- 
ing become the mother of six children: Edna May, born Aug. 10, 
1887, married 11. R. Iluddleston, Dec. 20, 1906, and they have a 
daughter, Pauline; Ethel Alice, born Aug. 4, 1889; James Howard, 
born Nov. 30, 1891 ; Mary Elsie, born July 12, 1894, died March 18, 
1897; Esther, born July 2, 1900; and one child died in infancy. 

James S. Frazer, deceased, for many years one of the prominent 
jurists of the State of Indiana, was a native of Pennsylvania, but 
was a Wayne county product, inasmuch as he was reared and began 
his career within its confines. He was born in Hollidaysburg, Pa., 
July 17, 1824, son of James and Martha (Somerville) Frazer (see 
sketch of George Frazer). His parents were thrifty people, owned 
a good farm, and gave their son the best available opportunities for 
an education, which was so improved that it is said there was not 
a book within his reach that was not eagerly read. His mother 
died when he was quite young, and in 1837 ms lather removed to 
Wayne county, Indiana, then almost a wilderness. In 1S40 James 
S. Frazer commenced the study of law with Moorman Way, at Win- 
chester, Ind., teaching school winters to defray expenses. He was 
admitted to the bar in Wayne county, in March, 1S45, and m April 
of the same year opened an office in the city of Warsaw, where he 
resided until his death, except seven years in Waukegan, 111., and 
brief periods when professional and official relations required his 
absence. He was married Oct. 28, 1848, at Goshen, Ind., to Miss 
Caroline Defrees, daughter of James Defrees, whose brothers were 
Hon. John Defrees, formerly United States Government Printer, 
and Hon. Joseph li. Defrees, a former member of Congress from 
the Warsaw district. In politics Judge Frazer was originally a 
Whig, but after the dissolution of that party, in 1852, he became a 
Republican, and no political contest was held after 1842 in which 
he did not take part and was an acknowledged leader and power. 
His party always looked to him as one of its most prominent stand- 
ard-bearers. In 1847 and ^48, and also in 1854, he was a member 
of the House of Representatives of the State legislature. While he 
was in the legislature, in 1854, his efforts were mainly devoted to 
the establishment of our present system of public schools. Previous 
legislation had been rendered ineffectual by decisions of the Su- 
preme Court, and by request of the leading friends of education he 
was placed at the head of the committee to draft and introduce the 
bill which became the law of the State. He gave his whole heart 
and mind to the subject — feeling its great importance — and the re- 



KIOC.RAPIIICAL 52(J 

suit was the school law of 1S55. The most important amendments 
to that law since that time were urged by him. So to him we are 
indebted for the beneficent boon of a free education for the children 
of the State, and Indiana's school system has been copied wholly 
or in part by many other States of the Union. In 185 1 Judge 
Frazer was elected prosecuting attorney of the Warsaw judicial 
circuit, and in 1862 was appointed by President Lincoln Revenue 
Assessor for that revenue district, holding' the office two years, lie 
was one of the judges of the Supreme Court of Indiana for six 
years— from 1865 to 1871. Under the treaty of May 8, 1871, be- 
tween the United States and Great Britain, President (Irani ap- 
pointed him a commissioner on the part of the United States 
government. The Twelfth article of that treaty required the com- 
missioners to proceed forthwith to the investigation of the claims 
which should be presented to them. They were to investigate and 
decide upon such claims as they were to think proper upon the evi- 
dence presented to them by each government, and their decision 
was final. The other members of the commission were the Rt. 
Honorable Russell Gurney, representing the interests of England, 
and Count Louis Corti, of Italy, as neutral, chosen by Great Britain 
and the United States. This commission adjusted all the claims 
against the English government by American citizens, as well as all 
against our Government by British subjects, arising from the Civil 
war. Judge Frazer was in the employ of the Treasury Department, 
at Washington, from 1873 to 1X75, in the adjustment of claims for 
cotton captured or destroyed by the Government during the war. 
These positions were in many respects of the highest responsibility 
known to any agent of the United States government. They in- 
volved the consideration of claims amounting to $220,000,000, and 
the duties required the highest order of talent — judicial, financial, 
and diplomatic. That no greater honor was justly won by any of 
our citizens in that critical period of our national history than by 
Judge Frazer, in the discharge of his great and delicate responsi- 
bilities, will be evident when we remember that his duties were per- 
formed to the entire satisfaction of both countries — England and 
the United States. As a jurist he was well known, ami his decisions 
while on the Supreme bench gained for him an extended reputation. 
lie was appointed by the Supreme Court of the State as one of the 
three commissioners, consisting of Hon. David Turpie, of Indian- 
apolis; lion. John 11. Stonzenburg, of Xew Albany; and lion. 
James S. Frazer, of Warsaw, to revise and codify the laws of Indi- 
ana. President Harrison offered him the position of commissioner 
on the part of the United States for the settlement of the Venezu- 
elan claims, and thus three Presidents appointed him to or offered 
him office. But he declined President Harrison's offer, as he was 
at that time judge of the Kosciusko County Circuit Court — his last 
official position — which he held by appointment of Governor Hovey, 
his term expiring Jan. 1, 1891. Judge Frazer died at his home in 
Warsaw, Feb. 20. 1893. His life was noted for its purity in all 
respects and his memory is one to be cherished and honored where- 
ever true manhood is prized. 



530 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

Frank C. Williams, a well known and respected citizen of 
Green township, was born near Peru, in Miami county, Indiana, 
Oct. to, i8(>i. His paternal grandfather, Christopher Williams, 
came from Guilford county, North Carolina, to Hamilton county, 
Indiana, in an early day, and there spent the remainder of his life. 
The father was Richard Williams and the mother was Sarah (Bor- 
ton) Williams, born in New Jersey. Air. Williams received his edu- 
cational training- in the district schools of Green township and the 
schools of Williamsburg, attending until nineteen years old and 
working on the farm in the meantime, lie remained at home until 
twenty years old and then rented a farm of hi win Horn, north of 
Fountain City, where he resided five years. After his marriage he 
purchased forty acres of land, between Williamsburg and Fountain 
City, and resided thereon seven years, engaged in general farming 
and stock raising, lie then purchased his present faun of 210 acres, 
two and one-half miles northeast of Williamsburg, but afterward 
sold fifty acres of this tract and purchased eighty acres, adjoining 
on the east and known as the Blair farm, lie is an enthusiastic ad- 
herent to the Republican party, but never acquired the habit of 
seeking public office. His wife is a birthright member of the 
Friends' church, affiliating with the Cherry Grove Monthly Meet- 
ing. On Feb. 16, 1886, he was united in matrimony to Miss Almede 
Marine, daughter of Ira and Clarkey (Nichols) Marine, of Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, natives of North Carolina. Mrs. Williams 
was born in Randolph county, Oct. 8, 18(15. ( )f the union of herself 
and husband have been born live children: illanche, born June 5, 

1889, graduated in the Williamsburg schools and at a business col- 
lege in Richmond, and is at the present time the stenographer at 
the Murray Theatre in the city of Richmond; Esther, born Oct. 2$, 

1890, is the wife of Leslie Carper, superintendent of the Safety Gate 
Works, and they have a son, Everett, born Oct. 29, 1908; Paul 
Marine, born Feb. 29, 1892, graduated at the Williamsburg High 
School at the age of eighteen and is now assisting his father on the 
farm; Edith, born Feb. 14, 1896, is a student in the Williamsburg 
High School; and' Jessie, born May 17, 1902, is also in school at 
Williamsburg. Mr. Williams has been a Royal Arch Mason many 
years, first joining Whitewater Lodge, No. 159, and later transferr- 
ing his membership to Fountain City Lodge, No. (107. lie is also 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, Aldene Lodge, No. 322, at 
Fountain City, having been a member of that lodge the past twenty 
years. 

Benjamin F. Wright is a native of this county and was born 
on his father's old homestead in Abington township, Jan. 28, 1865. 
All his life has been spent in this and adjoining counties and he is 
numbered among the successful farmers and wide-awake citizens 
of his district. His parents were Joseph and Sarah (Ranck) Wright, 
the former a native of Abington township, this county, and the 
mother was the daughter of George Ranck, who came from Penn- 
sylvania to Wayne county. The paternal grandfather was Henry 
Wright, an early settler of Abington township. Our subject's father 
spent his earl)' days after the manner of the boys in the' early 



BIOGRAPHICAL 53 1 

Wayne county settlements and obtained his education under diffi- 
culties. He followed fanning all of his life, ami about 1870 removed 
to Fayette county, where he spent the remainder of his career. Ben- 
jamin F. Wright was one of six children born to his parents, and 
was a small boy when the family removed to Fayette county. He 
attended the district schools in Waterloo township, in that county, 
until sixteen years old. After his school days were completed he 
continued to work on the farm, and at the age of twenty-six years 
took charge of and operated a farm belonging to his aunt in Wayne 
county. After his marriage he returned to Fayette county and 
lived on a rented farm eight years, at the end of which period he 
removed to Brownsville township, Union count)-, and rented a farm 
three years, lie then removed to Boston township, Wayne county, 
where he rented a farm one year, and then purchased the farm of 
156 acres in New Garden township which he now owns and resides 
on, engaging in general farming and stock raising. He is a believer 
in thoroughbred stock as the best for all purposes, but does not 
specialize in any particular breed. In politics he is a member of 
the Democratic party, his politics in local matters, however, being 
independent, and he has never aspired to hold public office. On 
Dec. 25, 1 89 1 , our subject was united in marriage to Miss Catherine 
Brookley, born in Butler county, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1870, and came to 
Wayne count}' with her parents when six years old. She is a daugh- 
ter of Wyndall and Ann (Stover) Brookley, of Jackson township, 
this county. To Air. Wright and his wife have been born three chil- 
dren : William Leslie, born Oct. 17, 1802; Earl, born Dec. 29, 
1896; and Geneva, born Dec. 29, 1899. Airs. Wright is a member 
of the Evangelical church. 

George Washington Study, who has been prominent in the 
public and agricultural life of Wayne county a number of years, 
was born on a farm northwest of Williamsburg, in Green township, 
July 4, 1856. Both parents — John W. and Marguerite (Massey) 
Study, were born in Wayne county, and they became the parents of 
six children: Hannah L. is the wife of Winfield Smith, of Illinois, 
and they have a son, Paul; George W. is second in order of birth; 
Mayberry, a farmer in Wayne county, married Elizabeth Duke and 
they have two children — Roy and Harry ; Andrew is deceased ; Cora 
married Klihu Suayne, of Fconom'y, and they have three children — 
Mabel, Ermine, and Earle ; and one child died in infancy. The 
paternal grandfather, Joseph Study, was a native of North Caro- 
lina and his wife was Hannah Wade. George W. Study's educa- 
tional advantages were limited to the district schools in the vicinity 
of his boyhood home. From the time he finished the prescribed 
courses until twenty-three years of age he assisted his father in the 
management of his farm in Green township. In 1881 lie rented the 
farm where he resides, going in debt for bis team and other equip- 
ments, and in fact bis wagon was the only 11 tonsil that was free of 
incumbrance. He rented this farm twenty years and then purchased 
it. He made improvements in the way of fences and buildings, and 
to-day the farm is one of the most valuable and productive pieces, 
of property in tlie county. He does a general farming business and 



5^ 



WAYNE COUNTY 



the land is in a splendid state of cultivation. In the matter of poli- 
tics Mr. Study is liberal in his views. On Sept. 2j, 1879, was cele- 
brated his marriage to Miss Cassie Kennedy, daughter of John \V. 
and Mahala M. (Cook) Kennedy, of Williamsburg, and of this 
union was horn a daughter, Belva, April 8, 1885. She is the wife 
of Dorsey Thurston and the}- have two children — Delia, horn Nov. 
27, 1909, and Emerson, horn Sept. 3, 191 1. Mrs. Study is a mem- 
ber of the Friends' church. The Kenned}' family is of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry and were early settlers in this county. John W . Kennedy 
was an influential citizen. In early life he was a cooper by trade 
but later became a farmer, lie was horn in the State of Michigan 
and his wife was horn in Wayne county. They were the parents 
of five children: Martha married Avazana Cates, of Michigan, and 
they have three children — Harry, Elsie, and Hubert; Cassie, the 
wife of Mr. Study; Clysses G., who resides in Williamsburg, mar- 
ried Cora Duke and they have five children — Paul, Ruth, Alice 
Ivan, and Josephine; and two died in infancy. 

Frank Clements, a prosperous young farmer of Green town- 
ship, was horn on the farm where he resides, July 24, 1885. He i< 
a son of Anthony and Laura (Gates) Clements, natives of Indiana, 
the father born in Randolph county, Oct. 30, 1852. The Clements 
family has been identified with this section of country since a very 
early day. Ferguson Clements, the great-great-grandfather, was 
killed by the Indians a little north of the present site of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and Isaac Clements, the great-grandfather, helped to lay out 
the village of Williamsburg. William J. Clements, the grandfather, 
was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1825, and at the age of three 
years was brought by his parents to Indiana. The family settled 
near Williamsburg, but William J. afterward removed to Randolph 
county. lie died in 1903. During his active career Anthony Cle- 
ments followed the calling of a farmer and was educated in the 
schools of Green township. After his first marriage he removed to 
Randolph count}", where he rented land four years and then pur- 
chased the present home farm in Green township, which he tilled 
and ditched and brought up to a high state of cultivation. He built 
a new house and barns on this farm and resided there untl he re- 
tired, in 1910, and moved to Lynn. Both parents are now living in 
that village. On May 30, 1878, he was married to Laura Gates, 
daughter of Elmire ami Malinda (Hatfield) Gates, both families 
being pioneers of Wayne county, and Thomas Hatfield laid out the 
town of Green's Fork. Of this union were born five children: 
Claudia, bom Feb. 14, 1 879, married James M. Catey, of Green town- 
ship, and the}- have four children— Mildred, Doris, Francis, and 
Josephine; Alice, bom Aug. 21, 1881, married Ora Pitts, of Green 
township, and they have three children — Forrest, Kenneth, and 
Mary Louise; Lulu was born Aug. 5, 1883; Frank is the next in 
order of birth ; and Edith, born May 26, 1889, married Herbert John- 
son, of Randolph county, and the}- have a son, Dudley. Lulu is a 
graduate of the Boston Training School and i^ teaching in the Bal- 
timore Voting Women's Christian Association. The educational 
advantages of Frank Clements were those afforded by the district 



BIOGRAPHICAL 533 

schools in the vicinity of his boyhood home, the high school at Wil- 
liamsburg, and Purdue University, and he has always worked on 
the In ime farm. Like his father, Mr. Clements is allied with the 
Republican party, but has newer consented to become a candidate 
for any office. In fraternal matters he is affiliated with Lynn Lodge, 
No. 119, Knights of Pythias. On June 11, 1010, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Clements and Miss Bessie Jennings, daughter 
of James M. and llattie ( Raussen ) Jennings, of Wa\ ne county. The 
mother of Mr. Clements is a member of the Friends' church. 

William A. Duke has been a resident of Wayne county since 
his birth and is numbered among the honored citizens and success- 
ful farmers of Green township, lie was born at Williamsburg, this 
cunt), Feb. 15, 1847, a son of Solomon M. and Eliza ( Bishop) Duke, 
the former burn in North Carolina and the latter in Webster town- 
ship, Wayne county. The maternal great-grandfather, Benjamin 
Bishop, was born at Kingwood, X. J., April 5, 1759, and in 1770 vol- 
unteered for service in the Revolutionary war. Mis father was also 
bom in Xcw Jersey and was a sea captain. While in London he 
was "impressed" into the British naval service and was so held 
seventeen years, for eleven years of the time being kept continuous- 
ly on a war vessel. After his release be returned to America to 
find that his family had gone west to occupy some Revolutionary 
war land grants in Eastern Ohio. From there they had removed 
to Wayne counts, locating at Webster, where he eventualh found 
them, anil he lived there the remainder of his lite. Solomon M. 
Duke, a son of John Duke, removed from North Carolina to Ohio 
and thence to Wayne county. He was a tailor by trade and located 
at Williamsburg, becoming one of the influential citizens of that 
village and being held in uniform confidence and esteem. Mis wife 
passed away in 18/6 and his death occurred in 1888, They were the 
parents of fourteen children, four of whom are living: Benjamin, a 
Civil war veteran, resides in Richmond; Wiliam A is the next in 
order of age; Marian is the wife of John King, of Centerville ; and 
George is a farmer in Green township. William A. Luke is in- 
debted to the schools of Williamsburg for his early educational 
training ami attended until about sixteen or seventeen years old. 
When a lad of twelve years lie worked out 1>\ the month, attending 
school when he could", and he has devoted a good portion of his 
active career to the agricultural industry, being now the owner of 
a well improved farm of 150 acres. At the age of nineteen years 
he purchased a team, earning the money to pa)' for it, and then 
rented fields near Williamsburg and farmed three or four years. 
lie then purchased a threshing outfit and operated that in season 
fifteen years, lie also purchased a half interest in a saw mill with 
Reuben Woolle) and became activch engaged in operating thai 
and two threshing outfits, at the same time bin 111- walnut and other 
timber and hauling it to Richmond. In 1883 he sold the mill and 
purchased the place where he now resides, lie is a general farmer 
and -lock raiser, and through energy and good management has 
developed a valuable properlv, the while he has so ordered his life 
as to -ain and retain the lnvli rcmod of hi. fellow in. 11. Me is very 



534 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

liberal in his political views, and while he takes a loyal interest in 
local affairs of a public nature has never been incumbent of office. 
Mr. Duke has been twice married. His first union was solemnized 
in 187S with Miss Mary Smelser, daughter of John and Eliza 
(Stegall) Smelser, and she died in 1881, being- survived by one son, 
Frank, a farmer in Green township. In 1883 ^ ir - Duke contracted a 
second marriage, being then united in wedlock to Miss Margaret 
Ellen Outland, born in Randolph county, Indiana, Sept. 29, 1855, 
a daughter of Thomas J. and Assinith (Pritchard) Outland, who 
came to Randolph county from North Carolina, Mr. Outland bring- 
ing a number of slaves with him and setting them free when he 
reached the soil of Indiana. Of this second union of Mr. Duke were 
born six children — Charles, Harold, Mary, llerschel, Robert, and 
Clifford. Harold married Emma White, daughter of William 
White, and they have a son, Doyle. Mr. Duke has been a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Williamsburg, 
since earl_\- manhood, and his wife is a birthright member of the 
Friends' church. 

Stephen A. Hinshaw has been a resident of Wayne county for 
several years and is a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of this favpred section of the State, lie is one of the successful 
farmers and stock growers of Green township, where he resides, and 
is influential in local affairs. Mr. Hinshaw was born in Randolph 
county, Indiana, July 10, 1871, a scion of a family founded in Amer- 
ica in the Colonial era of American history. His paternal grand- 
father was Jacob li. Hinshaw, who came from Randolph county, 
North Carolina, in an early day and settled in Randolph county, 
Indiana. Stephen A. is a son of Meredith and .Mary Ellen (Fudge) 
Hinshaw, born in Randolph county, Indiana, the former in 1846 and 
the latter on .March 29, 1847. Meredith Hinshaw was recognized as 
one of the most progressive and influential citizens of the com- 
munity in which he so long lived and labored to goodly ends. He 
and his devoted wife became the parents of three children. Stephen 
A. Hinshaw was reared to maturity on the old homestead farm of 
his father and his educational advantages were those afforded in 
the district schools, supplemented by courses at the Danville and 
Marion normals. At the age of eighteen he began teaching and fol- 
lowed that occupation in the district schools of Randolph county 
about seventeen years. But he never found it expedient to with- 
draw his allegiance from the great basic industry under whose in- 
fluence he was reared, and in connection with agricultural pursuits 
has won his present position of independence and definite pros- 
perity. While teaching he was associated in the work of the farm 
during vacations, and this represented an incidental feature of the 
development and cultivation of the "willing soil" of the old home- 
stead. I lis present farm is tine of the model places of Green 
townships and many of the improvements on the place were made 
by him. Everything about the farm indicates thrift and prosperity 
and Mr. Hinshaw is thoroughly in touch with the general welfare 
of the community. Mis political allegiance is with the Republican 
party, and he is a member of the Masonic order and also of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 535 

Knights of Pythias at Lynn, taking an active interest in the affairs 
of these local organizations. The year 1892 bore witness of the 
marriage of Mr. Hinshaw to Miss Anna Rosebone, who died in 
1898, leaving a son, Russell, born Jan. 3, 1893, and now a student in 
the high school at Williamsburg. In 1901 Mr. Hinshaw was mar- 
ried to Clara Moffett, a daughter of William N. and Rachel Moffett, 
of Randolph county, and of this union have been born two children: 
Winifred, born Oct. 25, 1905, and Leslie, born Sept. 15, 1907. After 
his second marriage Mr. 1 linshaw purchased a farm in Randolph 
county and resided thereon until he purchased his present farm in 
Green township, lie and his wife are members of' the Friends' 
church. 

James M. Schroeder, a native son of Wayne county and a scion 
of a sterling German family, is numbered among the representative 
agriculturists and stock growers of the township of Green. His well 
improved farm is located on rural mail delivery route No. 26, from 
the village of Fountain City. .Mr. Schroeder was born in the city 
of Richmond, this county, Nov. 22, 1855. a son of Henry and Mary 
(Bushker) Schroeder, natives of Prussia, the father "born in the 
city of Bielefeld, in 1826, ami the mother's birth occurred in 1835 
in Hanover. Germany, The father came to America in 1848, and 
after spending two years in New York City came to Richmond, 
where he helped to construct the first railroad that entered that 
city. He afterward bought land in New Garden ami Green town- 
ships, where he became a successful farmer and was recognized as 
a citizen of sterling character and utmost loyalty — one who ever 
commanded unequivocal confidence and esteem. The mother came 
from the old country upon reaching maturity and she ami her hus- 
band became the parents of six children: James M. is the eldest; 
Sarah is the wife of William Ergenbrodt, of Webster township, and 
they have one child, Etta ; John married Elizabeth Driggins, resides 
at Richmond, and they have five children — Florence, Marie, Inez, 
Sheridan, and Raymond; William M. (see sketch); Lydia is the 
wife of Barlow Trice, of Fountain City; and Hannah died at the 
age of six years. James M. Schroeder gained his rudimentary edu- 
cation in St. Paul's parochial school in Richmond, which he attended 
until thirteen years old. He then worked in the office of the gas 
company one year, after which the family moved to the farm now 
occupied by William M. Schroeder. James M. remained at home until 
married, since which time he has given his attention to the man- 
agement of his finely improved farm, which is devoted to diversified 
agriculture and stock growing. On Aug. 2^, 1883, he was married 
to Mary L. Deitemeyer, daughter of Adam ami Louisa (Laughman) 
Deitemeyer, of Wayne township, but natives of Hanover, Ger- 
many, and of this union have been born eight children: Henry A., 
bom July 31, 1884, resides at home and assists in the management 
of the farm; Herbert J., born Feb. 9, 1886, is a farmer in Randolph 
county, and is married to Bessie Clark; Emma died at the age of 
eight years; Cora, born March 14, 1890; Clarence died in infancy; 
Alice, born Julv 6, [893; and Alma and Edith (twins), born July 28, 
1896. 



536 



U E JIOJ.RS OF WAYNE t'OUN '1' V 



John B. Miller, one of the progressive farmers and stock 
growers of Green township, was born in Pennsylvania and the date 
of his nativity was July 19, 1852. lie is a son of John S. and Maria 
l Rrintonj .Miller, natives of Pennsylvania, the former born in York 
county, son of Abraham Miller, The father was a man of impreg- 
nable integrity and honor and ever commanded the unqualified re- 
gard of his fellow men. lie ami his devoted wife were parents of 
thirteen children. To the district schools of Pennsylvania John 15. 
.Miller is indebted for his early educational privileges, and he at- 
tended until sixteen years old.' lie has been identified with agri- 
cultural pursuits from his youth to the present lime and has found 
ample scope for prolific ami gratifying effort in connection with the 
great basic industry under whose influences he was reared. At the 
age of sixteen he came to Randolph county, Indiana, and worked in 
that county on a farm one year, at the end of which period he went 
to Mason county, Illinois, lie returned to Randolph county the 
following Christmas and continued to reside there until 1884, when 
he removed to \\ ilson county, Kansas, where Ik- purchased a farm, 
five years later he disposed of his possessions in the Sunflower 
Slate and came back to Randolph county, where he lived on rented 
land for six or seven years, lie then purchased the farm where lit 
resides in Green township, this county, and the place is one of the 
well improved and ably conducted farms of the township. In poli- 
tics Mr. Miller gives his allegiance to the Republican party and he, 
as was his wife, is a member of the Christian church. ( hi ( )et. 19, 
[872, he was united in marriage to Mis> Jennie Gllllett, born in 
Randolph county, Indiana, Oct. 3, 1847, a daughter of Ezekiel and 
Xancy (Combs J Gullctt. She died Nov. 30, 1909, having become the 
mother of seven children: Winnie Myrtle, bom Jan. 4. 1874, died 
in infaiKw ; I'.urlev Omar, born Dec. 18, 1875, died in infancy; lul- 
w-ard Raymond, born Dec. 7. 1877, married Rhoda lill.is, and they 
have a son, Raymond Ellis, born in 1903; Silas Caldwell, born Oct. 
1, 1879, has been principal of the high school at Hagerstown the 
past three or four years; Harry Garfield, born Sept. 3, 1881, died in 
Kansas; Orville Irvin, born Dec. 1 }, 1883; and llattie May, bom 
May 13, 1S87, died Dec. 10, 1907. Mr. Miller is a member of Lodge 
Xo. 33I2 .if the Red Men al Carlos City, having passed through the 
chairs of that local organization, and he is also a member of the 
Williamsburg bodge, Xo. 4 o.b Free and Accepted Masons, his son, 
Orville, also being a member of thai fraternity. 

Orlando B. Catey is one of the substantial farmers and repre- 
sentative citizens of Green township, and has been a resident of 
Wayne county, with the exception of a few years, since the time oi 
his birth, lie is a member of one of the old and honored pioneer 
families of the county and his personal status is such as to still 
further contribute to the prestige of the name which he bears. 
Mr. Catey was bom in Green township, this county, on the old 
homestead farm, and the dale of hi, nativity was |Ab. _".). 1848. 
I le is a son of Samuel Catey, who was born on the old Catey home- 
stead in Green township and resided there until a few years of 
his death, lie and his devoted wife, I'riscilla ( aley, lived lives uf 



OGRAl'll K'AI 



537 



signal honor and usefulness and their names merit an enduring 
place on the roster of the worthy pioneers of this county. They 
became the parents of seven children. The paternal grandfather 
was John Henry Christian Catey, born in .Hamburg, Germany, 
and came to America as a small boy, first locating in Xew Jersey. 
In 1797 he bound himself out in Delaware to John Rispham for a 
period of three years, and later in life came to Indiana. In 1822 
he entered land east of Williamsburg, in Wayne county, and lived 
there the residue of his life. Orlando l'». Catey was reared to 
manhood on the old homestead farm, in connection with whose 
work he soon found adequate demands upon his time and allen- 

Williamsburg. During the long intervening years he has been 
almost continuously identified with agricultural pursuits in Wayne 
county, and in Green township he now owns and occupies a line 
farm of eighty acres. lie remained on the old homestead until 
nearly twenty-two years old and since then has always worked 
for himself. On Sept. 30. 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Albina J. Smith, a daughter of James and .Mary (Johnson) Smith, 
of Wayne county. Mrs. Catey died \K\\ (», i8<)<>. having become 
the mother of three children: .Mary Etta is the wife of Jesse 
I'.akehorn, of Wabash county, Indiana, and Samuel Mertou and 
James Milton are successful and enterprising young farmers of 
Green township. Samuel Merton married Anna Newman and of 
this union has been bom a sun, Harold George. James Milton 
married Claudia Clements anil to them have been born four chil- 
dren-Mildred. Doris, Frances, and Josephine. Alter his fust 
marriage Mr. Catey rented a farm in Randolph county, where he 
resided three years, and then returned to Wayne count}' and pur- 
chased a farm near Economy, In 1807 he- moved to his present 
place o-f residence, having erected a convenient cottage house, a 
barn and outbuildings, and his farm now ranks as one among the 
best improved of the township. On Dec. <j, i<jo_>, he married Mary 
Elma (llaisleyj Parsons, daughter of Franklin and Mazanah 
(Thomas) Haislcy, formerly of Wayne county but now of Win- 
chester. Randolph county, Indiana. In political matters Mr. Catey 
is found arrayed as a loyal supporter and advocate of the cause 
of the Republican part)', and the entire family hold membership in 
the Friends' church. 

Dr. Aubrey L. Loop is one of the sterling citizens whom 
I'.oone county has contributed to Wayne county,' and through his 
own exertions and abililv has worked his w a_v upward from the 
position of a farm boy In that of one of the leading and successful 
physicians of the county in which he came as a young man, in 
Kjoo. One can rcadilv read between the lines of these statements 
and must realize that Dr. Loop has had a definite object in view 
and that he did not dissipate his energies during the preliminary 
stages of his progress. lie was born in liooiie county, Indiana, 
Nov 18, 1S74, a -on of Henry and Amanda |. (t uiiningham), 
Loop, native- of that same county, where they havi passed their 



538 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

entire lives and still maintain their home, in the village of Ad- 
vance, that county. They are the parents of two children. The 
Loop family is of German extraction and has heen resident in 
America the past 150 years. The original immigrants were three 
brothers, one of whom settled in Canada, one in Pennsylvania, and 
the third, Christian Loop, from whom Dr. Loop is descended, set- 
tled in Rockingham county, Virginia. The paternal great-grand- 
father, Christian Loop, Jr., came to Indiana, in 1834, and settled in 
Boone county, where he purchased land and also entered a tract 
of government land. His son, David, grandfather of Dr. Loop, 
was born in Augusta county, Virginia, Feb. 4, 1818, and came to 
Indiana with his parents in 1834. He became the father of seven 
children, one of whom, Henry, father of Dr. Loo]), was born March 
9, 1845. -L )r - Loop gained his early education in the district schools 
of his native county and then became a student in Wabash Col- 
lege, later attending Butler College, and his professional educa- 
tion was received in the Indiana Medical School, at Indianapolis, 
where he graduated with the class of 1899. He then spent one 
year at the Indianapolis City Dispensary, at the end of which time, 
in 1900, he came to Economy and opened an office for the practice 
of his profession, and has been successfully so engaged up to the 
present time, which indicates the valuation placed upon him and 
the confidence reposed in him by the people of the community. He 
is a close student of the advances made in his profession and thus 
has well deserved the prosperity and success which have attended 
his efforts. He is a Democrat in politics and he and his wife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. In June, 1901, 
Dr. Loop was united in marriage to Miss Lynne B. Young, a 
daughter of George T. and Catherine Young, of Boone county, 
Indiana, and of this union have been born two children — Margaret 
Jane, born April 7, 1903, and Aubrey Young, born Sept. 14, 1910. 
Charles Jesse Ballenger is numbered among the progressive 
farmers and popular citizens of Perry township and has been a 
resident of Wayne county from the time of his birth, which oc- 
curred in Perry township, Dec. 4, 1886. His great-grandfather, 
Benjamin Ballenger, was born in North Carolina, grew to man- 
hood there, married Sarah Shiveley, and came to Wayne county 
with his family in 1829. He had four sons — William, Jacob, John, 
and George. William Ballenger, grandfather of Charles )., was 
born in North Carolina, Nov. 16, 1824, and hence was five years 
old when brought to Wayne county by his parents. He grew to 
manhood and was educated in Wayne count}', attending the sub- 
scription schools in Green township and afterward the school at 
Centerville. He combined teaching with farming and became one 
of the successful men of his township. On Oct. 30, 1846, he was 
married to Lydia Starbuck and of this union were born ten chil- 
dren, of whom George S., Alice, Jacob O., W. L., Addie M., and 
James E. lived to maturity, Mary E. and Isabelle O. died young, 
and two children died in infancy. George S. is the father of Charles J., 
Jacob O. is a merchant in Economy and ex-trustee of the town- 
ship, W. L. is an ear, nose, and throat specialist in Chicago,' and 



BIOGRAPHICAL • 539 

James E. is a farmer. George S. Ballenger, retired, was born in 
Perry township, Aug. 30, 1855, ant l there was reared and educated, 
lie began life at farming, which vocation he successfully followed 
until his retirement in 1909. He is a Republican in his political 
views and he and his wife are consistent members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Economy. On July 22, 1881, he was united 
in marriage to Emma C. Weaver, born Feb. 26, 1861, in Wayne 
county, daughter of Jesse and Martha 11. (Howell) Weaver, the 
former a native of Virginia who came to Wayne county in 1835, 
at the age (if ten years, ami the latter was born and reared in 
Wayne county. The father followed farming, and he and his wife 
were the parents of five children — Bennett 1'., Nelson F., Ozro 
I)., Elmer E., and Emma Clarabelle. To George S. Ballenger and 
wife were born four children: Lulu V., born May 19, 1882, died 
Nov. n, of the .same year; Zora M., born Aug. 4, 1883, married 
Frank C. Cain, .Aug. 27, 1902, and they have three children — Fan- 
nie, Forrest, and Martha; Guy W., born March 11, 1885, was mar- 
ried Aug. 1, 1906, to Blanche Wilson, and they have three chil- 
dren — Dorothy, Donald, and Harold; and Charles J. is the young- 
est. He was reared in the sturdy discipline of the farm and his 
early educational advantages were those afforded in the public 
schools at Economy, lie has never wavered in his allegiance to 
the great elemental industry under whose influence he was reared. 
After his marriage he moved to his Grandfather Ballenger's farm, 
where he resided one year, and then removed to the farm where he 
resides and which is owned by his father. He has well upheld the 
prestige of the honored name which he bears and is a citizen of 
loyalty and public spirit. His political support is given to the Re- 
publican party, but the honors and emoluments of public office 
have not aught to appeal to him. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows at Economy, and he and his wife 
are held in high regard in the social circles of the community. On 
Dec. 31, 1007, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ballenger to 
Miss Ada E. Engle, daughter of Daniel and Martha Engle, of Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, and of this union is one child, Doris Lucile, 
bom May 2^, 1910. Daniel Engle was one of a family of twelve 
boys, and he and his wife have also reared a family of twelve chil- 
dren. He is a prominent farmer in Randolph county. 

Henderson B. Oler, one of the representative farmers and 
stock growers of Perry township, now living retired in the village 
of Economy, is a native son of Wayne county and a scion in the 
third generation of one of the sterling pioneer families of this sec- 
tion of the 1 lousier commonwealth. He was born in Perry town- 
ship, this county, April 9, 1847, a son OI Adam Oler, born in a little 
hut in Green township soon after his parents came to Indiana, in 
1819. Henry Oler, the paternal grandfather, was a native of the 
State of Virginia, as was also his wife. They came to Wayne 
county in 1819, and he took up a tract of government land in 
Green township, where he developed a farm and where lie and his 
wife passed the residue of their lives. Adam Oler was reared, in 
Green township and secured his early educational training in the 



54o 



MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 



primitive schools of the pioneer period. He became in due time 
one of the independent and successful farmers of ferry township, 
where lie was a loyal and upright citizen, ever commanding the con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellow men. lie and his devoted wife 
became the parents of nine children. Henderson 11. (Her was reared 
on the lumie farm and is indebted to the district schools of Perry 
township fqr his early educational discipline, lie has never wav- 
ered in his allegiance to the noble art of husbandry and is num- 
bered among the progressive and popular representatives of the 
agricultural indiistn in Perry township, where he has a well im- 
proved farm, which he has rented out since moving to Economy. 
His political allegiance is given to the Republican party, and he 
and his wife hold membership in the llrethren church at Sugar 
Grove. Oct. 19, 1870, bure record of the marriage of Mr. Oler to 
Miss Sarah C. Addington, a daughter of liishop and Delilah Ad- 
dinglon. of Wayne county, and of this union were horn four chil- 
dren: Darrv, born fan. 26, 1872; Cicero, horn Eeb. 19, 1S74; leie, 
horn May if), 1877. 'died Jan. 29, 1 SSj ; and Omar, horn April 13. 
1888. Darrv married .Minnie Smith, of W'avne county, and the\ 
have one child, .Marie; Cicero married May Wolfordi of Wayne 
count) - , and they have a son. Virgil; and Omar married Lulu 
Hani's, daughter of Daniel Harris. 

John Martin Manning, a genial farmer and stock raiser of 
Pern township, was born on the farm where he resides, Aug. 11. 
18(15, son of Ceorge 1'.. and Susan (Lamb) Manning, the former 
horn in Connecticut and the latter a daughter of llarve) and Lettie 
Lamb, of Pern township, this count)'. The Manning family is of 
English origin, the first immigrant being William M aiming", 'who 
came from England to Massachusetts in 10.^4, with his family, and 
his son, Samuel Manning, took an active part in raising funds for 
the establishment o\ Harvard College. Mam of the Mannings 
served as soldiers in the war of the Revolution. Ilc/ekiah Man- 
ning, grandfather of |ohn M., came to Indiana from Connecticut 
in the 20s of the last century and purchased kind. lie then 
went back to Connecticut, where he married Mar)' Jacobs, and 
about eight months after the birth of their son, George Ik, lather of 
John M., the) came to Indiana and settled in Perry township, this 
count)', (ieorge Ik Manning married Susan Lamb in 1856, and 
he followed farming during all of his active career. They became 
the parents of ten children. John M. Manning received his pre- 
liminary education in the public schools of Perry township and 
afterward attended school at Economy, the high school at Hagers- 
tuwn, and the Valparaiso Xurmal School. At the age of twenty- 
one he began leaching school and followed that occupation in 
Green and I 'err) townships a period ^i three years. He then ac- 
cepted a position in the railway mail service, between Pittsburgh 
and St. Louis, in which capacity he was employed about six years, 
hut he always kept in touch with farming, with the idea of making 
it his life's occupation. In lyoi lie returned to his father's farm, 
that parent dying in the fall of that year. 1 lis mother died in loeid, 
and he and his 'sister then purchased the old home place, when 



IUCK W'llK'AI. 



541 



lie has since resided, although he owns another farm near by. In 
politics, he gives adherence to the platform expressions of the Re- 
publican party, although liberal and independent in his views, and 
his church affiliations are with the United Brethren church. In 
October, 1885, Mr. Manning was married to Miss Lora Ballenger, 
daughter of Jacob BaHenger, ex-sheriff of Wayne county, and of 
this union four children were born: George A., born Jan. 13, 
1888, attended the school in Economy, graduated at DePauw Uni- 
versity in June, 191 1, and is teaching in Randolph county; Howard, 
bom May 29, 1891 ; Martha Louise, July 24, 1895 ; and Harold, Aug. 
28, 1900. Mr. Manning's first wife died in 1900, and on July 21, 
1903, he was married to Mrs. Celeste (Conley) Atkinson, widow of 
John Cain Atkinson, of Economy, and a daughter of Isaac and 
Lnzena Conley, of Boston township, both deceased. Airs. Man- 
ning was born Oct. 22, 1864, and she is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Edgar Irving Manning, a popular agriculturist of the town- 
ship of Perry, was born on his father's farm in Terry township, 
Feb. 11, 1878, son of George 1!. and Susan (Lamb) Manning (see 
sketch of John M. Manning). He received his education in the 
district schools of Perry township and in the high school at Econ- 
omy, and at the age of eighteen finished his studies and there- 
after worked on his father's farm until married. lie then pur- 
chased his present farm of 160 acres, upon which he erected a line 
dwelling house and commodious barns, and there has since re- 
sided, successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. In politics, 
he gives his unswerving allegiance to the principles of the Prohibi- 
tion party and his church affiliations are with the United Brethren 
church, while his wife is a member of the Society of Friends. In 
1901 Mr. Manning was married to Miss Clara Mendenhall, daughter 
of A. Grant and Phoebe A. (Oler) Mendenhall, of Economy (see 
sketch of A. Grant Mendenhall), and of this union have been born 
two children — Elizabeth, born Feb. 11, 1903, and Christine, bom 
Nov. 23, 1906. 

Alves Mendenhall, a prosperous farmer of Perry township, 
was bom on his father's farm in Clay township, this county, Sept. 
21,. 185-1. He is a son of Caleb C. and Luzetta (Dean) Menden- 
hall, his father born in Clay township, this county, Nov. 21, 1825, 
and his mother was a native of North Carolina, born Jan. 23, 1827. 
She came to Indiana with her parents — Frederick and Polly Dean — 
who located in Wayne county and there her father followed farm- 
ing. Caleb C. Mendenhall followed farming all of his life in 
Perry and Clay townships and died March 3, 1866. The paternal 
grandfather was Isaiah Mendenhall (see sketch of A. Grant Men- 
denhall). Alves Mendenhall received his early education in the 
public schools of Perry township and at an earl)- age began to 
assist in the work of the home farm. When he was fourteen years 
old his father died, and having no brothers, the management of 
the farm early fell upon him, the duties of which he attended to 
until 1881. lie then purchased a farm in Clay township, where he 
resided until 1890, when he sold that place and purchased his 



54 2 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

present farm of 120 acres in Perry township, lie also owns an- 
other tract of 160 acres in the same township and to the manage- 
ment of his landed interests gives his entire attention. On June 
20, 1874, Mr. Mendenhall was united in marriage to Miss Susan 
Shoemaker, daughter of John and Lucinda Shoemaker, of Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, where Mrs. Mendenhall was horn Nov. 2, 
1852. Of this union were born seven children: Carrie is the wife 
of Aldo Cain, of Henry county, Indiana; Romania is the wife of 
Frank Osborne, of Denver, Colo. ; Roscoe C. resides in Perry 
township; Effie is the wife of Marion Mull, of Green township; 
Reba is the wife of Ward Jackson, of Green township; and Yirgic 
and Kelso reside at the parental home. Mr. Mendenhall is a Re- 
publican in his political views and he and his wife are members of 
the United Brethren church. The father of Mrs. Mendenhall was 
born in Wayne count)- and her mother was a native of Nonth 
Carolina, from which State she came to Indiana after the death of 
her parents. Roscoe C. Mendenhall was born on the old home- 
stead of his grandparents, Aug. 9,. 1880, and received his education 
in the district schools and in the schools at Economy, attending 
until about seventeen years old. He then helped his father on 
the farm until married, after which he rented a farm for six years 
and then purchased his present place of eighty acres in Perry town- 
ship. On Feb. 7, iuoi, he was married to Mattie Grace Lester, 
daughter of John and Susan (Rowers) Lester, of Henry county, 
Indiana, where Mrs. Mendenhall was born Dec. 21, 1881. The an- 
cestors of her parents came from North Carolina. Of this union 
was born a daughter, Lvaline May, July 10, io (l 7, and she died 
when four days old. Roscoe C. Mendenhall is a Republican in 
politics, fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Economy, Lodge No. 150, and he and his wife are 
members of the United Brethren church. 

Milton Cain, a successful and prosperous farmer of Perry 
township, was born on his father's farm in that township, Sept. 23, 
1843. J' c > s a s,,n of Jonathan and Priscilla (Lamb) Cain, natives 
of Wayne county. John Cain, the paternal grandfather, served 
as a soldier through the Revolutionary war, came from North 
Carolina to Wayne county in the early part of the Nineteenth cen- 
tury, about the time this region was being apportioned into farms 
by the government, and he took up some government land in Perry 
township which he cleared and upon which he founded the first 
home of the Cain family in this county. His wife was Susan 
Henlbe. Upon this pioneer farm Jonathan Cain was born, and in 
the district schools of Perry township he received his early educa- 
tion, lie followed the occupation of his pioneer father and followed 
agricultural pursuits throughout his entire active career. His wife 
was a daughter of Thomas and Anna Lamb, early settlers of 
Wayne county, and to Jonathan Cain and wife were born four chil- 
dren: Elizabeth married Wilson Pierce, of Perry township, and 
both are deceased; Hannah is the wife of Lewis Pierce, residing 
west of Economy, in Perry township; Milton is the next in order 
of birth; a-nd Josephine died in early womanhood. Milton Cain 



l'.IOCKAPHICAL 



543 



received his early education in the district schools of his native 
township. When he was eleven years old his father died and he 
went to live with an uncle, Perry Hurst, in Perry township, where 
he resided until twenty-one years old. lie then rented a tract of 
land and later purchased a small farm south of Economy, which 
he operated three or four years. His frugality and industry then 
enahled him to purchase his present splendid farm of 120 acres. 
This land has been greatly improved by Air. Cain, new fences hav- 
ing' been built, an extensive drainage system instituted, and he 
built a comfortable home ami good barns, lie is engaged in gen- 
eral farming" and has been very successful, adding to his landed 
possessions. In politics Mr. Cain has always been a Republican, 
but has never sought public office, and he and his wife are affili- 
ated with the United Brethren church. On March 21, 1872, he 
was married to Miss Adaline Wilson, youngest daughter of John 
and Hannah (Bond) Wilson, of Clay township, where Mrs. Cain 
was burn Jan. 8, 1845. Of this union were born five children: 
Luella. born in 1873, died at the age of twenty-three years; Ger- 
trude, born Oct. 17, 1877, resides at home; Zora, born Oct. 29, 
1881, is the wife of Albert Gilmer, a farmer of Clay township, and 
they have one child, Ruby; Nellie, bom Dec. 25, 1884, is the wife 
of Clarence Fonts, of Hagerstown ; and Walter, born Nov. 19, 
1886, resides at the parental home. 

William Elvin Oler, a prosperous and prominent farmer of 
Perry township, was born Sept. 10, 1858, on his father's farm, 
which is now his own, in Perry township. He is a son of Adam 
and Elizabeth (Ballenger) Oler, natives of Wayne count)-, the 
father born in Green township, July 25, 1819, and the mother, 
bom Nov. 2, 1820, in Ross county, Ohio, came to Wayne county 
with her parents when six years old. They were married Feb. 2, 
1843, and became the parents of nine children. The Oler family 
came originally from Germany, the name of the first immigrant 
being Henry Oler, and he settled in North Carolina. His son, 
also named Henry, grandfather of William E., married Sarah Por- 
ter in North Carolina and came from that State to Wayne county 
in 1816, entering the land upon which his children were born and 
which is still in the possession of his son, Henry Oler. The mater- 
nal grandparents of William E. Oler were Benjamin and Sarah 
(Shiveley) Ballenger (see sketch of Charles J. Ballenger). Adam 
Oler, the father, was educated in his native township and later fol- 
lowed the occupation of his father, that of farming. He acquired 
a good landed estate of 240 acres in Perry township and it was 
there he died in 1893, his wife surviving until 1901;, when she died 
at the age of eighty-eight years. William E. Oler received his 
early education in the country schools in the vicinity ot his home, 
lie began working on the home farm and remained with his par- 
ents until they died. He early engaged in the buying and selling 
of cattle and hogs, and when his father died, in 1893, he took 
charge of the farm and made a home for his mother. In 1881 he 
purchased his first land, it being a tract of 120 acres off the south 
half of the old homestead, and after the death of his mother added 



544 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

the remaining 120 acres by buying out the other heirs. He also 
owns a farm of 92.5 acres in Jefferson township, which he pur- 
chased in 1905, and eighty acres in Green township, but resides 
upon and operates the old homestead. He has followed a line of 
general farming, but has always been a large dealer in live stock, 
buying and shipping to the markets. He is a stockholder in the 
First National Bank at Williamsburg and in the Modoc Telephone 
Company, in which latter corporation he is also a director. In 
politics he belongs to the Republican party, and he and his wife are 
affiliated with the United Brethren church at Sugar Grove: On 
Nov. _', 18S2, he was united in marriage to .Miss Jennie A. Mettert, 
daughter of George G. and Elizabeth (Foots) Mettert, who came 
from Treble county, Ohio, to Wayne county, the father following 
farming in Jefferson and Clay townships, and both are now de- 
ceased. Mrs. Oler was born in Wayne count} - , Jan. 27, 1859, and 
to her and her husband were horn three children: Clyde G., born 
March 15, 1884, married Essie L. Taylor, daughter of John W. and 
Hannah G. Taylor, and of this union was born a daughter, Nola 
Bess, Nov. 12, igio; Nola Beryl, born March 13, 18S8, graduated in 
the Economy High School and later attended Earlham College and 
the Indianapolis Conservatory of Music, and now resides at the 
parental home, as does also Luther Paul, who was born June 13, 
1894, a student in the high school at Economy. 

Charles W. D. Jones, deceased, for many years one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of Cambridge City, was born in Centerville, Wayne 
county, Indiana, Aug. 5, 1858. He was the son of Oliver T. and 
Mary (King) Jones (see sketch of Lincoln H. Jones). He re- 
ceived his educational training in the public schools of his native 
village', and was identified with that community in his youth and 
early manhood until his removal to Cambridge City, where he be- 
came connected with the First National Bank. He began the bank- 
ing business with his father in Centerville, at the age of sixteen 
years, and thus his entire career was spent in financial affairs in- 
volving care and good judgment. As such he was considered of 
more than ordinal"}' ability and gained and held the confidence of a 
large number of patrons. He was long the cashier of the First 
National Hank of Cambridge City and assisted very materially in 
successfully conducting its affairs. In 1893 ne assisted in estab- 
lishing the Wayne International Building and Loan Association 
and continued a member of its board of directors until death. No 
little of the achievements of that institution are due to his wise 
and conservative methods. In his political views Mr. [ones was a 
stanch Republican. On Dec. 14, 1887, he was married to Miss 
Jennie Elliott, daughter of the late Cabin I!, and Rebecca 
(Swayze) Elliott, of Cambridge City, and their home life was 
ideal. Of this union was born a son. Herman, who attended the 
Culver .Military Academy with the class of 1910. He had previous- 
ly attended a business college at Richmond, and in 1008 entered 
the First National Hank at Cambridge City as teller. .Mr. Jones' 
death occurred March t, 1006, and the widow resides at the home- 
stead in Cambridge City. Cabin 11, Elliott, father of Mrs. Jones, 




CHARLES W. D. JONES. 



OGRAPHICAL 



545 



was a native of Wayne county, born in Centerville, April 29, 1826, 
a son of William and Eliza (Branson) Elliott. He was educated 
in Cambridge City and at tbe age of fourteen entered mercantile 
life in bis father's store. In 1847 ne married Rebecca Swayze, a 
daughter of John B. Swayze, of Henry county, and in 1866 he died, 
leaving three children: Emma, who married Albert V. Hodskin, 
of Springfield, Ohio; Eddie C, and Mrs. Jones. Air. Elliott was 
again married, in 1868, to Maria D. Bowman, of Erie, Pa. Through- 
out the most of his active career he was engaged in the mercan- 
tile business in Cambridge City, being one of the foremost mer- 
chants in that vicinity. During the Civil war he was a staunch 
Union man and was liberal in his donations to the soldiers and their 
dependent families. 

Enos T. Veal, at the present time the incumbent of the office 
of trustee of Perry township, with residence at Economy, was born 
on his father's farm in Randolph county, Indiana, Oct. 3, 1S51. Ilis 
parents are George W. and Maria (Sears) Veal, the former born in 
Clay township, Wayne county, Aug. 19, 1818, and the latter a 
daughter of Curtis Sears, who came from Ohio to Wayne county 
and later removed to Keokuk, Iowa. Mr. Veal received the name 
of Enos from his paternal grandfather, Enos Veal, a native of the 
State of Xew Jersey who came to Indiana in the earl}' part of the 
last century and settled in this county. He purchased a tract of 
uncultivated land, which he cleared and on which he erected the 
first home of the Veal family in Indiana, and he continued to re- 
main a resident of Wayne count}' until his death, which occurred in 
Wayne township. George VV. Veal received his early education 
in the district schools of Clay township and in earl}' manhood 
removed to Randolph county, where he purchased land and has 
since resided. In politics he has been a Republican since the birth 
of that political organization, and he held the office of township 
assessor in Randolph county many years. In 1800 he was elected 
treasurer of Randolph county and served one term, refusing a sec- 
ond nomination, believing that a man should hold the office only 
two years. In the primary at which he was nominated he received 
double the number of votes cast for all the other candidates in 
the field. lie has now retired from all active business and is living 
in Winchester, the county seat of Randolph count}'. He and his 
devoted wife are the parents of fourteen children. Enos T. Veal, 
like his father, received his early education in the district schools 
of his native section, supplemented by two terms in the Lebanon, 
Ohio, schools, and spent his boyhood on his father's farm. At the 
age of seventeen he began teaching in Randolph count}', follow- 
ing that occupation four terms, and in 1870 went to Iowa to see 
the country. He liked it so well that he remained two years; de- 
voting his time to teaching school and working on farms by the 
month. In 1873 he came to Wayne count} and worked on a farm 
by the month two years. In 1875 he went to Arkansas and worked 
in a stave and handle factory, beginning as engineer, but after six 
months was made foreman and afterward had full charge of the 
factory. The location being in the lllack River swamps it was 



546 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

very unhealthy, and Mr. Veal returned to Wayne county and 
worked for a time on a farm by the month. After his marriage he 
rented a farm three years, at the end of which period he rented 
another tract in the northern part of Terry township, where he re- 
sided twenty years, and he had the place under his control for 
twenty-five years. In 1900 he moved to the village of Economy, 
where he purchased property, and afterward bought his present 
commodious residence. While operating the rented farm he pur- 
chased a tract of land adjoining, which lie still owns. In politics 
Mi". Veal has always been a Republican. In 1880 he was elected 
trustee of Perry township and served in that position until 1895. 
In 1900 he was again elected, serving four years, and in 1910 was 
appointed to the same position for the term ending in 1914. He 
is a man of high standing in the count), having been the executor 
of some very large estates and the guardian of minor children. On 
March 4, 1879, Enos T. Veal was united in marriage to Ida E. 
Bailey, born Sept. 9, 1859, daughter of David L. and Martha 
(Wilson) Bailey, and of this union was born a son, Cicero B., 
Feb. 23, 18S0. The son is a graduate of Purdue University, at 
Lafayette, Ind., and has been for some time a professor of Me- 
chanical Engineering and at the head of the machine design depart- 
ment of that institution. lie married Miss Jennie Albertson, 
daughter of Joseph Lee Albertson, and of that union have been 
born two children — Mary Eunice and Martha Louise. Mr. Veal 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William Alonzo Cain, a prosperous farmer of Perry township, 
was born on a farm in Randolph county, Indiana, May 20, 1861. 
He is a son of Allen and Elizabeth ( VVeyl) Cain, early settlers of 
Green township, and a grandson of Jonathan and Elizabeth Cain. 
Allen Cain was a farmer all of his life. He is deceased and his 
widow resides at Economy. To him and his wife were born six 
children: William Alonzo is the eldest; Alice is the wife of Sam- 
uel Stover, a farmer near New Castle ; Artie married Ottie Crull 
and resides on the old Cain homestead in Perry township; Etta 
died in childhood; Earl and Pearl are twins, the former married 
India McGunigal and is a farmer in Dalton township, and the latter 
is the wife of Ira lloober, a farmer in Henry county. William 
Alonzo Cain came to Perry township with bib parents when very 
young and received his early education in the schools of Economy 
and at the Shaw school in Perry township. He began life working 
on his father's farm and continued there until 18S5, when he rented 
a farm in Jefferson township and continued to operate the same 
until 1890. lie then purchased the old Manning place of 160 acres 
in Perry township, where he has since been engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. He has greatly improved the farm and 
has since added two additional tracts, which bring his total acreage 
up to 186. Politically Mr. Cain belongs to the Republican party, 
and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Economy. On Aug. 6, 1885, ne was married to Miss Dora M. 
Manning, daughter of George and Susan Manning (both deceased), 
of Wayne county, and of this union were born two children : Paul 



BIOGRAPHICAL 547. 

H., born April 3, 1887, married Gail Haxton, daughter of Joseph C. 
and Ora Haxton, of Economy, and they have one child, Genevieve, 
born Jan. 13, 1910; and Marcella, born Jan. 26, 1897, resides at the 
parental home. The son, Paul 11., went to Colorado in 1900 and 
entered land there, and is extensively engaged in the dairy business. 
George W. Barnard, a highly respected and prosperous farmer 
of Perry township, was born on a farm in that township, June 3, 
1855. He is a sun of Eli 15. and lluldah (Canaday) Barnard, na- 
tives of Wayne county. The paternal grandfather, also named 
George W. Barnard, was a son of Uriah and Elizabeth (Macy) 
Barnard, and his ancestral history is given as follows: lie was a 
grandson of Timothy Barnard and Love (Swain) Barnard, Joseph 
Macy and Mary (Starbuck) Macy; great-grandson of Timothy 
Barnard and Man (Hunker) Barnard, George Swain and Love 
(Paddack) Swain, 'Joseph Macy and Hannah (Hobbs) Macy, Wil- 
liam Starbuck and Anna (Folger) Starbuck; great great-grandson 
of Benjamin Barnard and Judith (Gardner) Barnard, Peleg Bunker 
and Susanna (Coffin) Bunker, John Swain, Jr., and Experience 
(Folger) Swain, Nathaniel Paddack and Ann (Bunker) Paddack, 
Thomas Macy and Deborah (Coffin) Mac)', Benjamin Hobbs and 

, Jetho Starbuck and Dorcas (Gayer) Starbuck, Peter Fol- 

ger and Judith (Coffin) Folger; great-great-great-grandson of 
Nathaniel Barnard and Mary (Barnard) Barnard, Nathaniel Gard- 
ner and Abigail (Coffin) Gardner, William Bunker and Mary 
(Macy) Bunker, Stephen Coffin and Mary (Bunker) Coffin, John 
Swain and Mary (Wier) Swain, Peter Folger and Mary (Morrill) 
Folger, William Bunker and Mary (Macy) Bunker, John Macy 
and Deborah (Gardner) Macs, John Coffin and Deborah (Austin) 
Coffin, Nathaniel Starbuck and. Mary (Coffin) Starbuck, William 
Gayer and Dorcas (Starbuck) Gayer, Eleazer Folger and Sarah 
(Gardner) Folger, Stephen Coffin and Mary (Bunker) Coffin; 
great-great-great-great-grandson of Thomas Barnard and Eleanor 
Barnard, Robert Barnard and Joanna (Hervey) Barnard, James 
Coffin and Mary (Severance) Coffin, George Bunker and Jane 
(Godfrey) Bunker (on four lines), Thomas Macy and Sarah (Hop- 
cott) Macy (on two lines), Tristram Coffin and Dionis (Stevens) 
Coffin (on four lines), John Swain and Elizabeth Swain, Richard 
Gardner and Sarah (Shattuck) Gardner (on two lines), Joseph 
Austin and Sarah (Starbuck) Austin, Edward Starbuck and Cath- 
erine (Reynolds) Starbuck (on two lines), Peter Folger and Mary 
(Morrill) Folger; and the great-great-great-great-great-grandson 
of William Bunker, a French Huguenot, in England, Tristram 
Coffin and Dionis (Stevens) Coffin, John Severance and Abigail 
Severance, of Salisbury, Mass., Shattuck and Damaris Shat- 
tuck, of Salem, Mass., and Edward" Starbuck and Catherine (Rey- 
nolds) Starbuck. Returning to George W. Barnard, the grand- 
father of the subject of this review, it may be stated that he mar- 
ried Edith Bailey, of Wayne county, Indiana, in 1820. The father 
of our subject, Eli B. Barnard, born March 31, 1821, was the oidy 
offspring of this union. His mother died when he was six weeks old 
and afterward his father married an Irish woman, named Lening- 



54§ MEMOIRS OE WAYNE COUNTY 

ton, and they reared four children : Oliver, of Guthrie, Okla. ; 
Eliza (Barnard) Caheen, late of Iowa; and Amanda and Harriet. 
Eli B. Barnard was thus reared without a mother's care and solici- 
tude. His early life being one of hardship and privation, he learned 
the carpenter trade and was a fine workman and joiner before he 
was fifteen years old. In 1847 ne married lluldah Canaday and of 
this union were born seven children — Robert li., Edith E., one that 
died unnamed in infancy, Arminda M., George W., Irena M., 
and Sarah M. Of these children only three — Edith E., George \Y., 
and lrena M. — are living. The paternal grandfather of George \V. 
Barnard was Robert Canaday, born in Tennessee, Jan. [3, 1777. 
His wife, Amy (Sumner) Canaday, was born in Tennessee, April 
24, 1782, and they came to Wayne county, Indiana, and settled 
north of Economy, in 1816. Of their union were born nine chil- 
dren: Joshua, Nov. n, 1806; Lyda, May 5, 1808, died in infancy; 
Ann, May 2, 1809. died young; Abigail, May 12, 181 1 ; Thomas, 
March 5, 1813; Sarah, Dec. 13, 1815; Amy, March 5, 1817; lrena, 
April 14, 1819; and Huldah, May 13, 1821. The mother of these 
children died Sept. 25, 1823, and after her death Robert Canaday 
married her sister, Sarah Sumner, and of this union one child, l.ind- 
sey, was born, June 11, 1829. He is the only one of that family 
now living, and he resides in Economy, hale and sprightly and in 
the full possession of all his powers, at the age of eighty-two years. 
The maternal great grandfather, Joshua Sumner, was of noted 
Tennessee stock and lived to be 101 years old. To him and his 
wife, Sarah, were born the following children: Jonathan, Dec. 3, 
1770; Josiah, Feb. 22. 1775; Robert, Nov. 2, 1777; Charles, bom 
March 2, 1780; .Amy f grandmother of George W. Barnard), April 
24, 1782; Lydia, Sept. 18, 1784; Joshua, Sr., April 24, 1786; Sarah, 
May 2J, 1788; Abigail, July 4, 1791; and William, Feb. 2, 1795. 
Eli B. Barnard was a lifelong Republican ami gave a vigorous 
support to Lincoln's war measures during the Civil war. He died 
in 1900. George W. Barnard received his early education in the 
district schools of Perry township and in the schools of Economy, 
and has always worked on his present home farm. Since the death 
of his father he has continued to reside with his two sisters — Edith 
E. and Irena M. His occupation is that of a farmer, fruit grower 
and inventor. He is a Republican in his political views, and he is 
a birthright member of the Friends' church. 

William L. Fouts, a prominent farmer of Perry township, was 
born on a farm in Jefferson township, this county, April 16, 1875. 
lie is a son of John M. and Barbara (Williams) Fouts (see sketch 
of John M. Fouls). William T. Fouts received his education in 
the district schools of Jefferson township and at the schools of 
Economy and began his independent career by renting land of his 
father, "on the thirds," one season. After his marriage he rented 
a farm in Perry township and resided there two years, at the end 
of which time he purchased the Hale farm in the same township and 
lived there thirteen years, adding to its acreage in the meantime. 
In 1910 he purchased the Clark farm, consisting of 276 acres, lo- 
cated one mile northwest of Economy, and there he has since 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



549 



resided, engaged in general farming. On Nov. 26, 1896, Mr. Fonts 
was married to Miss Lida Ward, daughter of George F. and Mar- 
garet (Brown) Ward, who then resided near Brownsville, Union 
county. Mrs. Fouts was horn in Wayne county, Jan. 29, 1874. Of 
this union there is one child, Harold, horn April 20, 1809. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Fouts are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Economy, George F. Ward, father of Mrs. Fouts, is a 
mechanic and now resides at Cambridge City. He and his wife 
became the parents of seven children: Laura, the eldest, married 
William Beard and they had two sons — Frank and Byron. Mr. 
Beard died in early life and his widow married Rufus Williams, of 
Perry township. Mrs. Fouts is the second in order of birth. I.eona 
married Jesse Replogle, of Hagerstown, and they have one child, 
Helen. Hattie married Frank Jordan, of Perry township, and they 
have two sons — William and Raymond. Ida, Dora and Charley 
died young, and Mrs. Ward, the mother of these children, passed 
away June 8, 1891. 

William C. Northcott, formerly engaged in the lumber and 
milling business and later a prominent farmer and stock raiser of 
Perry township, was born in Troy, N. C, Dec. 30, 1832. He is one 
of eight children — four sons and four daughters — born to John and 
Mary (Bolan) Northcott, the former born in Kentucky and the lat- 
ter in Montgomery county, North Carolina. William C. North- 
cott received his education in the schools of his native State and 
remained at the parental home until he reached his majority. He 
then rented land in North Carolina and farmed until twenty-nine 
years old, when, in l86l, he came to Economy, this county, and 
formed a partnership with David Robbins in the flouring mill 
business, which they conducted four years. lie then engaged in 
the lumber business, buying timber and cutting it up and shipping 
the lumber, and was thus enployed about six years, at the end of 
which time the mill burned. He then rented a farm in Randolph 
county, where he resided five or six years, after which he purchased 
his present home place of about sixty-three acres, where he erected 
a comfortable house and good barns, and has since resided there, 
at the present time in practical retirement. To such characters as 
Mr. Northcott the community is greatly indebted, and his life has 
been a fine example of industry and patience. He is an adherent 
of the Republican party, and socially, when younger and aide to 
attend meetings, was a member of the Masonic order, having been 
made a Mason in the Economy lodge in 1866. On March 28, 1851, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Martitia Luther, daughter of 
Abraham and l.uvisa (Steed) Luther, of Montgomery county, 
North Carolina, where Mrs, Northcott was horn July 21, 1838. Of 
this union were born eight children: Margaret, horn April 17, 
1850, died at the age of three months; Mary A., born \ r ov. 25, 1858, 
is the wife of Sylvester II. Jones, of Richmond; Sarah L., horn 
June 21, 1S59, is the wife of Thomas B. Orr, of Anderson; John L., 
born Nov. 10, 1861, married Wilda McKinney; William F., born 
Oct. 21, 1863, resides at the parental home and has charge of the 
farm; Emma E. and Ella (twins), born May 16, 1866, the former 



550 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

of whom is the wife of John Comley and the latter is the wife of 
Reid Smith; and Charles E., born April 17, 1873, married Elizabeth 
Cain and resides at Hagerstown, Mr. and Mrs. Northcott are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Economy. 

Samuel Spahr Clevenger, trustee of Abington township, and 
one of its prominent and influential citizens, was born one mile 
north of his present residence, April 6, 1844, son of Samuel and 
Ruth (Spahr) Clevenger (see sketch of Francis M. Clevenger). 
After Samuel S. had finished the course afforded by the school in 
District No. 4 of Abington township, he abandoned his studies and 
engaged in farming. When about twenty-one years old he worked 
by the month one year, and in November, 1867, moved to his 
father's farm, which he rented several years. He then purchased 
120 acres of land, and at the time of his father's death added by 
purchase 120 acres mure. Ten years later he sold sixty acres and 
now has a farm of 160 acres, which is operated by his son. Mr. 
Clevenger improved the land and developed one of the finest farms 
in the county. At the last general election he was chosen trust' • 
of Abington township, to which office he devotes a large share of 
his time. He has always been a public-spirited man, and previous 
to his election as trustee had served four terms as supervisor, de 
voting much time and attention to the welfare of the township. 
In politics he gives staunch support to the men and measures rf 
the Democratic party and his election to office has always been as 
a candidate of that organization. He is a prominent member of the 
Masonic body, belonging to Cornelius Lodge, No. 232, at Abington 
His father and mother were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church when living, and in the faith of that chinch he was reared 
On Oct. 15, 1867, Mr. Clevenger was united in marriage to Mis? 
Nancy V. Simmons, born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, Nov. 24, 
1851, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Coward) Simmons, high 
ly respected residents of Union county, Indiana. Mrs. Clevengei 
died Feb. 21. 1906, having become the mother of eight children: 
Florence E., born May 2, 1869, is tne wiie OI William Plankenhorn 
of near Brownsville, Union county; David M., born Oct. 28, 1870, 
married Merlie McCashland and resides near Brownsville, in Union 
county; Margaret Alice, born Dec. 15, 1872, became the wife oi 
Edward Garthwait and died in 1894; Thomas F., born Nov. 9, 
1874, was first married to Lottie Rowland and after her death to 
Mrs. Mary ( . Berkshire, is a farmer and resides near Brownsville, 
in Union county ; John S., born Dec. 23, 1877. married Bessie Mc- 
Cashland and resides on his father's farm; Mary Edna, born Sept 
21, 1880, is the wife of William 11. Cans, a farmer in Hendricks 
county; Rebecca Leota, born July 19, 1885, is the wife of Harry V. 
McCoy, a farmer in Fayette county; and Eveline Ruth, born Feb 
6, 1892, died in infancy. On Nov. 24, 1908, Mr. Clevenger was 
married to Mrs. Florence V. (Treen) Davidson, born in Fulton 
county, Indiana, July 26, 1850, daughter of John G. and Sarah 
(Redd) Treen, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of 
Ohio. Mr. Treen was a very early settler in Fulton county, where 
he spent the greater part of his life, but he (bed at Logansport, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 55 1 

where he had lived retired ten or twelve years, Sept. 25, 1876. His 
wife had passed away several years before his death. Mrs. Cleven- 
ger's former husband, Charles Davidson, died Sept. 29, 1894, being 
at that time a resident of Jasper county. Of that union there were 
born nine children — Mary C, Carrie M. (deceased), Minnie Bell 
(deceased), Charles S. (deceased), Myrtle F., Jacob R., Birchard 
R., Merrill T., and Mabel. 

William Martin Wright, who died April 14, 191 1, was a well 
known farmer of the township of Abington, where he was a life- 
long resident, never having been away from the farm upon which 
he resided for a month at any one time. He was born on the farm 
where he died Sept. 4, 1840, a son of Henry and Nancy (Martin) 
Wright, the former born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, Nov. 19, 
1797, and the latter in Tennessee, Oct. 18, 1803. The father re- 
moved to Ohio in 1809, and was married there July 10, 1826. About 
1835 or 1836 he came to Wayne county and located in Abington 
township, on a part of the farm afterward occupied by his son, 
William M. His brother owned the other portion of the place, but 
later Henry Wright purchased this tract and at the time of his 
death owned 360 acres. He did not farm very much during the 
later years of his life, but made a business of loaning money. He 
died Dec. 31, 1855, and his wife passed away, Aug. 19, 1869. They 
were the parents of ten children: Margaret, born April 7, 1827, 
died March 2, 1846; Lucy Ann, born May 1, 1829, died July 18, 
1830; another child, born Feb. 4, 1831, died in infancy; John Wash- 
ington, born April 27, 1832, died Jan. 19, i860; another child, born 
April 2, 1834, died in infancy; Mary, born July 2, 1835, died Oct 
15, 1849; Josephus, born Sept. 18, 1837, is a l so deceased; William 
M. is the next in order of birth ; another child, born Aug. 30, 1842, 
died in infancy; and Nancy Jane, born Aug. 13, 1844, died Feb. 11, 
1887. William M. Wright received his education in a log school- 
house in Abington township, and after leaving school engaged at 
farming, which he followed during all of his exceedingly active 
career. His father died when he was fifteen years old, and after 
he had reached the age of twenty-one, in company with his 
brother, Josephus, he operated the farm as long as his mother lived. 
After her death the farm was divided according to the terms of his 
father's will, and William M. fell heir to the old homestead part 
of the estate. He later purchased his brother's portion and by sub- 
sequent purchases increased his landed possessions until he had 
440 acres of land which he operated, making a specialty of dairying' 
and stock raising. In politics he was independent, and he was a 
member of the Whitewater Horse Thief Detective Association. 
On March 22, 1866, Mr. Wright was married to Mrs. Mary Ann 
(Doddridge) Wright, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Weekley) 
Doddridge, former highly respected citizens, who are given ex- 
tended mention on other pages of this work. Of this union were 
born nine children: Leora Annetta, born March 26, 1867, died Oct. 
13, 1891 ; Sarah Nancy, born Sept. 15, 1868, is the wife of John L. 
Rugh, of Wayne township, and they have four children — Elsie 
May, Berling Reymond, Frances Elizabeth, and Florence Violet; 



552 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Lurena Frances, born Jan. 29, 1870, resides at the parental home; 
Howard Doddridge, born May 23, 1871 (died May 21, 191 1 ) , mar- 
ried Sarah Seller and she resides at Greencastle, lnd., the mother 
of four children — Mary Margaret (died in infancy), Lawrence 
Western, Minnetta Leota, and Howard Arthur (died in infancy) ; 
Grace lone, born Nov. 15, 1872, is the wife of Eller O. Douglass, a 
Methodist Episcopal minister, Madrid, Iowa, and they have four 
children — Clayton Otis, Emery Wright, Mary Katharine, and Doro- 
thy lone; Eliza Leuta, born July 14, 1874, is a trained nurse at 
Greenwood, lnd.; Mary Ellen, born Nov. 27, 1876, married a Mr. 
Ranch and she has one son, Robert Charles ; Charles Wilbur, born 
April 15, 1879, married Gertrude Johnson and resides at Gettys- 
burg, S. D. ; and Isaac Clayton, born Oct. 23, 1881, resides at home 
and operates the farm. Mrs. Wright was born in Union county, 
near the Fayette county line, March 12, 1837. The family home is 
pleasantly located and was erected in 1845. Mr. Wright was a 
member of Doddridge Chapel Methodist Episcopal church many 
years. 

Nicholas Tice, late resident of Abington township, and whose 
untimely death was recorded at that time of his life when his in- 
dustry had earned a respite from the arduous labors of his earlier 
years, was a native of Electoral Hesse, near Cassel, Prussia, born 
Oct. 22, 1833, son of Jacob and Katharine Tice, natives of Prussia. 
The father died when Nicholas was four years old, and the latter 
came to America at the age of nineteen, about 1852, becoming a 
resident of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he remained 
about six years, working for others for a time and then engaging in 
the lime burning business. In April, 1858, he came to Indiana and 
located in Wayne county, rented a house and worked one year for 
Jacob Fender, of Abington township. He then moved to Center 
township and rented a farm one year, and then moved to another 
farm where he remained three years. He then spent one year on an 
adjoining farm, at the end of which time-he purchased twenty acres 
in the southern part of Abington township, where he resided about 
sixteen years. Then selling that place, he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres where his widow resides, and this was added to by 
subsequent purchases, from time to time, until there is no acres in 
the homestead. He was a man of industrious and frugal habits, 
was significantly the architect of his own fortune, made the best 
improvements on his property and became one of the substantial 
farmers and highly honored citizens of the county. He continued 
to reside on the homestead until his death, Aug. 15, 1888, in the 
very prime of his useful manhood. On Aug. 30, 1857, he was mar- 
ried, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, to Elizabeth Diehl, born in 
Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, on the River Rhine, Dec. 20, 1835, 
and she survives her husband. Theirs was a beautiful domestic life 
and their example has ever been before their children, a lasting 
sacred memory. The widow is a devoted member of the Lutheran 
church, with which her husband was also prominently identified. 
In politics he was a stanch Democrat and was active in the 'Sup- 
port of the party cause in his locality, ever showing a loyal inter- 



biographical 553 

est in public affairs of a local nature. Of the thirteen children born 
to this estimable couple, and whose names are here entered in the 
order of birth, the eldest died in infancy ; John, born in May, 1858, 
died at the age of sixteen years; Lydia, burn Feb. 3, 1861, is the 
wife of Theodore Stinson, of Abington township ; Fred, borr Feb. 
22, 1863, is a farmer in Abington township; Susie, born Jan. 27, 
1865, is the wife of James B. Dye, of near Urbana, Ohio; Ella, 
born Sept. 29, 1866, is the wife of Charles Mattie, of Kokomo, Ind.; 
Daniel, born Jan. 29, 1868, is a farmer and resides north of Center- 
ville; Francis, born Jan. 5, 1870, resides in Richmond; Balzer, burn 
Nov. 6, 1872, resides in ("enter township; Charles, born July 26, 
1874, resides at home with his mother; Jacob, born April 24, 1876, 
resides at New Madison, Ohio; Louis, born Feb. 2, 1878, resides 
near Chester, Wayne county, Indiana; and Emmet, born Jan. 26, 
1880, is a farmer and resides near Centerville. Airs. Tice is a 
daughter of John Henry ami Margaret (Hauf) Diehl, natives of 
Ilesse-Darmstadt, Cermany, the father born in October, 1795, and 
the mother in June, 1S00. The former died Dec. 25, 1848, and the 
latter on June 25 of the same year. They were the parents of six 
children — John Peter (deceased), Anna (deceased), Susan, a daugh- 
ter that died in infancy, Mrs. Tice, and Barbara. 

George William Wright, a prominent farmer and stock raiser 
residing in Abington township, was born on the farm where he 
resides, Sept. 20, 1850. IT is parents were natives of Wayne county, 
the father, Washington Wright, born on the farm where Andrew 
Kramer resides, Jan. 31, 1826, and the mother, Teresa (Nugen) 
Wright, was born on what is now known as the 'AVray Farm," 
Dec. 4, 1824. They were married in Wayne county, Dec. 17, 1849. 
The father became a land owner about 1872 and was engaged as a 
farmer all of his life, dying March 2, 1904, his wife having died Sept. 
4, 1003. Three children were born to them: George W. is the eld- 
est; John P. resides at Denver, Colo., where he is superintendent 
of the Detention Home, the second institution of the kind to be 
established in the United States; and Enos S. is a farmer and stock 
buyer and resides in Centerville. George W. Wright was edu- 
cated at the school in District No. 4, in Center township, later at- 
tended school at Lebanon, Ohio, and at Danville, Ind., and he at- 
tended during a three-months' term at Spiceland, Ind. At the age 
of twenty-three years he taught a three-months' term of school in 
Abington township, following which he worked on the farm during 
the summer months and taught school in the winter for a period 
of about twenty-one years. He then rented a farm of his father in 
Center township and resided there three years, then lived on an- 
other rented farm in the same township two years, and at the end 
of that period purchased the farm where he resides, and which was 
the old homestead where his paternal grandfather died. At the 
time of the purchase the farm consisted of sixty acres, but Mr. 
Wright now has 140 acres, which is operated in a general way and 
he makes a business of stock raising, the farm being well stocked 
with cattle and also with horses. In politics he is a Democrat, 
but in all matters of a local nature is independent. On Sept. 10, 



554 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

1890, was celebrated his union to Miss Alice Hanagan, born on the 
Jackson King" farm, near Centerville, Nov. 3, 187 1. She is a daugh- 
ter of David and Elizabeth (Black) Hanagan, natives of Wayne 
county, where the father was born May 22, 1846, and the mother, 
Oct. 30, 1842. The father was always a farmer by occupation and 
resides in Center township. To him and his good wife were born 
seven children: Ida May is the wife of R. A. Malott, of Marion, 
Ind. ; Mrs. Wright is the second in order of birth; William D. re- 
sides in Indianapolis; Myrtle is the wife of Alpheus Kenworthy, a 
farmer near Connersville ; Etta resides with her father in Center 
township; Lilith is the wife of Charles Wambo, a farmer, of Cen- 
terville ; and Gaar is a farmer and resides in Center township. To 
Mr. and Mrs Wright one child has been born — Teresa Elizabeth — 
born May 3, 1909. Mr. Wright is a member of the Masonic order, 
being a Past Master of Centerville Lodge, No. 417, and he is also 
a member of the Eastern Star, as is his wife. His intention is to 
spend his days on this farm in Abington township. 

James Rariden Meek, deceased, was born near Earlham Col- 
lege, Richmond, Feb. 16, 1823. His parents — Joseph and Gululma 
(Smith) Meek — were natives respectively of Kentucky and North 
Carolina, and were very early settlers in Wayne count} , a part of 
the farm upon which the widow of James R. Meek resides having 
been bought from the government by the father, and they con- 
tinued to reside here until their respective deaths. James R. Meek 
received his education in the district schools of Abington township, 
where he was married Dec. 31, 1848, to Miss Catherine E. Adair, 
born near Springfield, Clark county, Ohio, Dec. 24, 183 1, daughter 
of Alexander and Matilda (Hoover) Adair, who, in 1S42, came to 
Indiana and settled near Union City, but afterward resided in Ab- 
ington township. To James R. and Catherine E. (Adair) Meek 
were born eight children: The first one, born Nov. 12, 1849, died 
in infancy; John W., born Feb. 9, 1851, conducts a stock ranch in 
Western Nebraska; Joseph, born Dec. 20, 1853, is a physician and 
surgeon and resides in Boston, Wayne county; Marquis de Lafay- 
ette, born May 9, 1856, is a farmer and retired physician and re- 
sides in Abington township, near Abington; Alexander, born Sept. 
2, 1858, is deceased; James R., born June 13, 1862, resides in Idaho; 
David C. E., born July 17, 1864, resides at home with his mother; 
and Charles Alfred, born June 4, 1872, is a farmer and resides at 
Centerville. The father of Airs. Meek is thought to have been born 
in Ohio and her mother was a native of Virginia. The father was 
a carpenter by trade, and after coming to Indiana and following 
that occupation for a time in Union City, he came to Abington 
township and located on a farm. Some years later he went back to 
Union City, but again returned to Abington township and later 
removed to Terre Haute. Thence he removed to Missouri, where 
he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. James R. Meek 
resided at the parental home until married, lie began the study 
of medicine some years before this event, and after he was married 
began the practice of that profession in Jonesboro, Grant county, 
in partnership with an older brother. After four months he took 



BIOGRAPHICAL 555 

a dislike to the profession and, giving it up, returned to Abington 
township and purchased a small farm adjoining the old Meek 
homestead. After his father's death he purchased the interest of 
the other heirs in the estate and thus obtained a farm of 115 acres, 
where Mrs. Meek resides. He taught school in winter and operated 
his farm in summer until too old to continue teaching. While never 
aspiring for office, he believed in the principles of the Republican 
parly, and the confidence and esteem of his political associates were 
manifested by election as trustee of Abington township, and he 
also served as assessor and Constable, filling every position with 
credit to himself and his party. His death occurred in Abington 
township, July 29, 1900. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. To the parents of Mrs. Meek were born eight 
children, four uf whom are living, and of these Mrs. Meek is the 
eldest; Amanda is the widow of Mr. Bordner and resides in Union 
City ; Samuel resides in Northern Indiana ; and Andrew resides in 
Union City. Since the death of Mr. Meek his widow has continued 
to reside on the farm, which her son, David C. E., operates. She 
has for years been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Abington. 

John W. Morgan, now a resident of Centerville, whose energy 
and determination have "acquired for him a home and farm in this 
county of his nativity, was born in Center township, Wayne county, 
April 26, 1853. His parents were James W. and Elizabeth (Abden) 
Morgan, born in Pennsylvania, the father on March 7, 1813, and the 
mother on Jan. 2, 1S16. The elder Morgan worked in a still house 
in his native State, though his father was the owner of a fine farm, 
and in 1844 came to Indiana (see sketches of Gilbert and Henry L. 
Morgan). John W. Morgan was educated at the district schools of 
his native township, and early in life, in 1875, left the parental roof 
and rented a farm in Abington township, which he operated at the 
time he was married, and which he continued to farm about twenty- 
three years ami then purchased fifteen acres in Center township, 
having an undivided interest in the home farm, and later he pur- 
chased forty acres in Abington township, having sold the fifteen 
acres to his brothers. Still later, he added sixty acres to this tract, 
and afterward fifty-five acres. Previous to this he had purchased a 
residence property in Centerville, where he resided three years, and 
later purchased 16.44 acres adjoining an eighty-acre farm which 
Mrs. Morgan inherited. He now has 211.44 acres in one tract and 
forty acres in another. He disposed of his property in Centerville, 
and aside from the three years, during which he resided there on 
account of the school advantages, he resided continuously in Abing- 
ton township, on one or the other of his farms, until June, 191 1, 
at which time he removed to Centerville, having built new build- 
ings in the summer of 191 1. He operates his land in a general way 
and a number uf years was engaged in the breeding of Poland 
China hogs. His chosen occupation has always been the life of a 
farmer and in this vocation he has prospered. His industry and 
activity have won for him a home in the county of his nativity 
and he is looked upon as a man of ability and strength of character. 



556 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

In politics he follows the doctrines of the Democratic party on all 
national issues, but regarding the administration of local affairs is 
independent, lie is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Lucas Grove, in Abington township, his wife alsu being a mem- 
ber of the same religious body. On Jan. 10, 1875, Air. Morgan led 
to the altar Miss Sarah E. Stevens, born in Abington township, 
Jan. 11, 1853, daughter of Robert and Sarah (Plessingcr) Stevens, 
the former born in Abington township, May 10, 1817, and the latter 
in Pennsylvania, Feb. 19, 1814. Of the union of Mr. and Airs. Mor- 
gan were born seven children. Pernina Ann, born Jan. 28, 1876, 
is th wife of Daniel Tice, a farmer in Webster township; James \V., 
born Oct. 1, 1878, married Ollie Wood, is a teacher by occupation, 
and resides in Madison county, Indiana; William E., born Sept. 15, 
1881, died Sept. 16, 1899; Grover T., born July 15, 1884, married 
Nettie Lamott, is a farmer, and resides in Abington township, on 
his father's farm; Myrtle, born Nov. 15, 1887, is the wife of Ross 
Petty, a farmer in Jackson township; Roy A., born Jan. 1, 1890, 
is also farming on his father's farm; and Raymond, bom June 5, 
1893, is a member of the class of 1915 in the Indiana University. 
Mr. Morgan is a member of the Alasonic order at Centerville, the 
Red A'len at Cambridge City, the Knights of Pythias at Centerville, 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Abington, and has 
served in all the chairs of the local organization of the last named 
fraternity. The father of Airs. Morgan was a land owner in Abing- 
ton township and was a tiller of the soil until he was compelled to 
retire, and he died in April, 1900, the mother having passed away in 
June, 1887. 

Charles David Miller, deceased, was born in Richmond, Ind., 
Alay 8, 1870, the third child of Lewis and Elizabeth (Neingert) 
Miller, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Indiana, 
now deceased. The son received his education in the schools of his 
native city and of Abington township, and remained at home until 
twenty-two years old. On June 15, 1892, he was united in mar- 
riage to Aliss Ethel P. Snyder, born near Brownsville, Union coun- 
ty, July 19, 1874, daughter of Oliver T. and Katharine (Keller) 
Snyder. Airs. Aliller's parents now reside at Ladoga, Ind. After 
his marriage, Charles D. Miller rented a farm in Abington township 
belonging to his wife's grandfather, and there resided twelve years. 
He then purchased the farm where his daughter, Ruby B. Smoker, 
now resides, having previously bought the forty acres adjoining this 
tract, and there resided continuously until his death, Oct. 1, 1910, 
and there the widow and children resided until June I, 191 1, when 
Airs. Miller took up her residence in Centerville. Mr. Miller was a 
successful man in his business ventures, owning at the time of his 
death eighty acres of land, which constituted one of the most neatly 
equipped farms in the vicinity. To Charles D. and Ethel P. (Sny- 
der) Miller were born four children: Ruby 1!., born Sept. 13, 1893, 
was married on Dec, 28, 1910, to Earl Smoker, son of William 
Smoker (see sketch) and they reside on the Miller home-stead, 
Bertha Katharync, born July 25, 1895 ; Edna Alay, born May 12, 
1897; am \ Morris D., born July 2, 1904; the three last named resid- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 557 

ing at home with their mother. Mr. Miller was a member of the 
Lutheran church and in his political views was a Republican. He 
served as director of the Abington and Centerville pike several 
years. Mrs. Miller's parents were born in Union county, Indiana, 
and to them were born two children: Carrie, wife of David Re- 
ville, of Center township, and Mrs. Miller. Mrs. Miller attends the 
Christian church. 

Mrs. Camilla (Walker) Dill, deceased, was born in Richmond, 
Ind., Aug-. 10, 1S71. Her father, Lewis C. Walker, was born near 
Wilmington, Ohio, at which place he studied and practiced the 
profession of law until he removed to Richmond, in 1869. Her 
mother, Camilla Farquahr Walker, was born in Palacias, Tex., but 
upon the death of her father the family moved to Wilmington, 
Ohio, in 1847. She was married to Lewis C. Walker in 1870, and 
Camilla (Walker) Dill was their only child. Lewis C. Walker, the 
father, was elected to the general assembly in 1872, serving two 
sessions, and on July 23, 1873, the family moved to Indianapolis, 
where they have since resided. Mr. Walker was elected judge of 
the Superior Court in 1880, serving twelve years, and since his re- 
tirement from that position has been engaged in the active practice 
of law. Camilla (Walker) Dill was educated at the Girls' Classical 
School in Indianapolis, under Mrs. May Wright Sewall, graduat- 
ing in 1889 with high honors. She also studied music under Pro- 
fessors Newland, Cappes and Leckner, and in 1890 spent a year at 
the New York Conservatory of Music. In the summer of 1891 she 
traveled in Ireland, Scotland, England, Holland, and France. On 
June 14, 1892. she was married to Howard Albert Dill and they 
continued to live in Indianapolis until October, 1895, when they 
moved to Richmond. During her residence in Indianapolis Mrs. 
Dill was an active member of the Dramatic Club and of the Mati- 
nee Musical Club, and after her removal to Richmond became asso- 
ciated with the Musical Club, the History Class, the Tourist Club, 
and was a charter member of the Richmond Chapter of the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution. She was also a prominent mem- 
ber of the First Presbyterian Church of Richmond, of which her 
husband is an elder. Of her marriage with Howard A. Dill were 
born two children — Dorothy, born in Indianapolis, March 17, 1893, 
and Malcolm Howard, born in Richmond, Feb. 11, 1899. Her sud- 
den and unexpected death, which occurred at her home in Rich- 
mond, April 1, 1910, was the occasion of much regret and sorrow 
to her host of friends. Her husband and children, with her parents, 
survive her. 

Lewis D. Stubbs, deceased, was many years a leading lawyer 
and influential citizen of Wayne count)' and prominently identified 
with public ati'airs. He was the eldest son of Jesse ami Mary 
(Jones) Stubbs and was born at West Elkton, Preble county, Ohio, 
July 14, 1833. on the farm on which his grandfather, Samuel 
Stubbs, had settled when he migrated with his family from Georgia 
to Ohio in 1805. After receiving the common school education of 
his native county, Mr. Stubbs attended William llaughton's school 
at Liberty; thence he went to Farmer's College at College Hill, 



558 MEMOIRS OF WAYNlv COUNTY 

near Cincinnati, at that time a flourishing institution under the 
Careys, lie began the study of law with Judge HSyn.es, at Eaton, 
Ohio, and later graduated at the Cincinnati Law School, lie was 
admitted to practice in Wayne county, Indiana, in 1857, the year 
of his removal to Richmond. He visited Centerville the first time, 
Dec. 18, 1857. The case of John C. Hudelson vs. The Indiana Cen- 
tral Railway Company was on trial. William druse, Oliver P. 
Morton, and John F. Kibbe'y were attorneys for the plaintiff; John 
S. Newman, Jesse P. Siddall, and Samuel \Y. Parker were for the 
defendants. He had letters of introduction to Judge Perry and re- 
turned to Richmond with him in his buggy. In 1S67 he was elected 
mayor to fill the unexpired term of Mayor John Finley. This was 
the only political position ever held by Mr. Stubbs, although he was 
a most indefatigable worker for the Republican cause. For many 
years he was chairman of the Republican County Committee and 
gave of his time and means liberally to the work. He was chair- 
man of the Congressional District and member of the State Central 
Committee. His devotion to politics was, however, more a matter 
of principle and an inheritance from public-spirited and anti-slavery 
ancestors, than a desire for personal advancement. As a lawyer Mr. 
Stubbs enjoyed a large practice, confined largely to civil cases, lie 
was a careful and laborious student, a man of sound judgment ami 
comprehension of legal questions, and unfailingly courteous to 
those with whom his profession brought him in contact. Judge 
Comstock said of him : "His successes at the bar were always fairly 
won. * * * Fie came out of protracted and trying litigation 
with the respect and good will of the opposing counsel. He never 
attempted oratory. * * * His strength did not lie in his ability 
as an advocate, but his good sense, his industry and learning in the 
law, and his high character commanded for him the respectful heal- 
ing of every court before which he appeared. No one ever spoke 
slightingly of his character or his ability as a lawyer or as a 
man. :;: * * No one in or out of the profession was freer from 
pretense or fraud." Though quiet and unassuming, Mr. Stubbs 
was a man of extraordinary attainments. His minci was a store- 
house of general information, gathered from every field of litera- 
ture, lie was one of the organizers of the Tuesday Club and a 
leading spirit in that coterie of broad-minded and cultured people 
which became famous in the annals of Richmond. In short, he was 
a good man and a true gentleman of the old school, a citizen whose 
record is without a blemish. His wife was Emily A. Mendenhall, 
daughter of Kirk and Amanda (Woodward) Mendenhall, born near 
West Milton, Miami county, Ohio, May 9, 1836. Her father was 
the son of Caleb and Susanna (Gardner) Mendenhall, also of that 
Quaker migration of 1805 to Ohio, from Georgia, on account of 
slavery in the South. The marriage of Lewis D. Stubbs and Emily 
A. Mendenhall occurred at West Elkton, Ohio, Oct. 2, 1856. The 
following year they moved to Richmond. Mrs. Stubbs was a beau- 
tiful woman, unusually energetic and equally studious with her 
husband, who enjoyed and encouraged her mental activity. She 
devoted much of her time to the study of art, for which she in- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



559 



herited a talent from her father. She was skillful in drawing and 
designing and was one of the earliest china painters in the country. 
She was a charter member of the State Keramic League, president 
of the Richmond Keramic Club, and of the Sketch Club, and one of 
the organizers and promoters of the Richmond Art Association. 
She was also active in the social life of the town, a member of the 
Tuesday Club and other literary clubs. She was a member of St. 
Paul's Episcopal Church. Air. Stubbs died Jul}' 8, 1902. Airs. 
Stubbs died Feb. 23, 1908. Two daughters, their only children, sur- 
vive them: Ada L., widow of William C. Bernhardt, deceased, 
now librarian of the Morrisson-Reeves Library ; and Edna, wife of 
Rev. J. E. Cathell. They aie both residents of Richmond. 

John Elwood Bundy, landscape painter and director in the 
Art Association, is numbered among the popular and highly es- 
teemed citizens of the city of Richmond, where he has his resi- 
dence and one of the most interesting art studios in America. Mr. 
Bundy was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, May 1, 1853, 
a son of John and Mary (Moore) Bundy, likewise born in Guilford 
county, North Carolina. In 1858 they removed to a farm in Mor- 
gan county, Indiana, where they lived the remainder of their lives, 
the father dying in 1891 and the mother in 1893. The father was 
one of the honored and substantial citizens of Morgan count). Mr. 
Bundy was reared on the old farm and resided with his parents 
until twenty-four years old. lie was educated in the district 
schools, supplemented by private study and reading, as the district 
schools did not afford man) advantages in those days. When he 
was eight years old his drawings of familiar scenes, animals, and 
persons, possessed such merit as to receive the favorable comment 
of his neighbors, and he determined that art should be his life work. 
As the years rolled swiftly by he continued to sit at the feet of 
Mother Nature, studying her in all her varied moods. At length 
he went to Indianapolis, where he received instruction from B. S. 
Hayes, then considered the most successful portrait painter in the 
State, and subsequently the young man studied in New York City 
and was allowed the privilege of copying at the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum. In 1877 Mr. Bundy commenced teaching art at Martinsville, 
Morgan county, Indiana, and for the next ten years denoted him- 
self to his chosen vocation, doing some tine work in the meantime. 
Then coming to Earlham College, he' took charge of the Art De- 
partment and was connected therewith eight years. He resigned 
this position in 1805, m order to devote himself more exclusively 
to painting, and because the demands upon his time had become 
too exacting. Since then he has been able to fill many commissions 
which he has received for landscape paintings. One of his best 
known efforts, entitled "Early Spring," a canvass 40x60 inches, 
hangs on the walls of Earlham College, as does also a fine portrait 
of Professor Morgan, painted from life. Mr. Bundy is an artist 
of national reputation and lias exhibited his paintings in the prin- 
cipal exhibitions. East and West. His fame rests chiefly on his 
ability to interpret the gentle words of nature, in quiet woodland, 
scenes, early spring with melting snows, and the tenderness of 
landscape in twilight. Many of his paintings are owned in the 



560 MEMOIRS Or WAYNE COUNTY 

schools and homes of Richmond and hy various collectors in all 
parts of the country. The most notable paintings are owned as 
follows: "Winter in Whitewater Valley," John B. Dougan, of 
Richmond; "A Trout Brook," Dr. Ualsey C. Ives, of St. Louis; 
"Woodland Memories," Mrs. M. J. Clark, of Grand Rapids; "Wood- 
land Pastures," Mrs. W. 11. Cole, of Duluth ; "Heart of Beech- 
woods." Museum of Fine Arts, of St. Louis; and "Blue Spring," 
the Art Association of Richmond. In 1875 was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. Bundy to Miss Mar}- A. Marlatt, born and reared 
in Morgan count)', Indiana, and they have two sons — Arthur L. and 
Walter K. Arthur L. lias inherited some of his father's genius and 
is a photographer in the city of Richmond. Walter E. is a civil 
engineer and is located in Chicago. 

Samuel K. Morgan, a prominent real estate dealer of the city 
of Richmond, was horn in the southern part of Hamilton county, 
Ohio, Feb. 24, TS52. His father, Samuel Morgan, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, bom near Perrin's Mill, and his mother, Eliza (Ken- 
nedy) Morgan, was born in Montgomery, Hamilton county, Ohio, 
where she and her husband were married. The. father was twenty- 
six years old when he came to Ohio with his father, Frank Morgan. 
The Morgans are of Scotch descent. The father learned the trade 
of a cooper in early life and worked at it until twenty -three years 
old, after which he followed farming a number of years. During 
the Civil war he was a feed contractor at old Camp Monroe, at 
Carthage, Ohio, where troops were recruited and supplies pur- 
chased and sent to the army. The family resided there when the 
Confederate, Gen. John Morgan, made his raid through that coun- 
try. After the close of the war Samuel Morgan returned to agri- 
cultural pursuits and devoted his attention to farming until he re- 
tired about ten years before his death. He resided at Hart well, 
Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, until about 1890, when he received 
his summons to another world. He was an Old Hickory Democrat 
in his political views and at one time was a member of the Knights 
of the Golden Circle. His wife, the mother of Samuel K. Morgan, 
passed away in 1861, and of their union were born four sons and 
four daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, with the exception 
of the youngest, Newton, who was drowned at the age of thirteen. 
Frank is deceased; John resides at Anderson, Ind.; Samuel (v. 
is the next in order of birth; Vermillia married a Mr. Clark and is 
deceased; Joanah is the widow of a Mr. Stevenson and resides at 
Robinson, 111. ; and Mary and Clara died of smallpox in 1864. After 
the death of his first wife the father married Mary Emmons, of 
Massachusetts, and she is now living in California with her two 
daughters, the survivors of a family of four — a son and three daugh- 
ters — born of this marriage. The father was a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church at Sherronville, Ohio. Samuel K. Morgan was educated in 
the Old Runyon school-house, District No. 4, of Sycamore town- 
ship, Hamilton county, Ohio, which he attended until twelve years 
old, and for two years thereafter rendered his father much able 
assistance about the old homestead. On the first Monday in Oc- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 56 1 

tober, 1866, he came to Richmond, and from that time on for twen- 
ty-nine years furnished straw for the Richmond Paper Mills and 
did contracting and general teaming and the handling of all kinds 
of heavy work. In 1895 he engaged in the real estate business and 
the past thirteen years has been in his present location, meeting 
with success as the reward of honest effort and industry. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican and for one term served in the office of mar- 
ket master uf the city. Fraternally he has membership in the Red 
Men and the Order of Moose. He is married to Ella S. Boone, 
daughter of Sampson and Elizabeth (Sanders) Boone, of Richmond, 
both deceased. The father was a farmer in early life and a number 
of years was trustee of Wayne township, lie also for thirteen 
years was in the employ of Gaar, Scott & Company, in Richmond. 
The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan occurred March 29, 1877, 
and they have two sons — Omar P. and Walter S. — both of whom 
are plumbers by occupation. 

Henry Werking Keagy, a prominent and influential citizen of 
Hagerstown, this county, was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
March 19, 1858. His father, Christian Keagy, a native of the Key- 
stone State, married Christina Werking, mother of the subject of 
this review and a native of the State of Pennsylvania, where both 
parents lived out their allotted years and died. The father was a 
farmer and flour miller by occupation. He was a member of a 
religious sect known as the "River Brethren," while the mother 
had membership in the Church of God, but they were both faithful 
to the father's church. In politics he was a Republican. Of their 
union were bom twelve children— Daniel, William, Mary M., 
Charles, Martha, James, David F., Henry W., Abram L., George 
M., Minnie, and Christiana, all deceased with the exception of 
Charles, in the bakery business at Altoona, Pa.; Henry W. ; and 
Christiana, a dressmaker in Martinsburg, Pa. Henry W. Keagy 
acquired his elementary education in the district schools of his 
native State, was reared on a farm, and at the age of sixteen com- 
menced working out by the month. For three years he worked 
in Pennsylvania and the next three years in Indiana. He came to 
Indiana at the age of nineteen and located in Wayne county, near 
Hagerstown. At the age of twenty-one he secured employment 
in the flour mill of Miller Brothers, at New Castle, but in a few 
months returned to Hagerstown and entered the employ of Zach- 
ariah Teeter, in the same line of business. In 1882, having accumu- 
lated a small capital, he purchased Mr. Teeter's interest in the lum- 
ber, mill and contracting business of Teeter & Werking, and has 
since been successfully so engaged, the linn being known as Werk- 
ing & Keagy. In 1891, William Werking withdrew from the firm, 
John M. Werking and Mr. Keagy becoming sole owners, and Mr. 
Keagy gives his time and attention to the management of the busi- 
ness, together with the office work. He is a Republican politically, 
and though he has never sought public office has been for two terms 
selected by popular vote to the office of member of the school 
board of Hagerstown, and at present is the treasurer of the board. 



562 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

He is a devout and enthusiastic member of the Christian church, 
with which religious faith he has been affiliated a number of years. 
On Dec. 10, 1885, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Mary 
Ellen Teeter, daughter of Zachariah and Barbara (Hoover) Teeter, 
who for man> years before their deaths resided in the village of 
Hagerstown. Of this happy union a son was born — George Henry, 
born Sept. 5, 1891. He received his preliminary education in the 
Hagerstown schools, prepared for college at the De Lancey School 
in Philadelphia, and is now in the University of Pennsylvania, tak- 
ing a course in architecture, and will graduate with the class of 
1913. Mr. Keagy has an interest in the Light Inspection Car Com- 
pany and also has real estate possessions in Arkansas and Mexico. 
John W. Leavell, living retired at the residence of his son, Wil- 
liam T. Leavell, in Jefferson township, was born in what is now 
Tipton county, Indiana, Feb. II, 1842, the first child of Benjamin 
and Fannie (Thornburgh) Leavell, natives of Kentucky and Indi- 
ana respectively. The members of the Leavell family participated 
prominently in the Revolutionary war, the paternal great-grand- 
father, John Leavell, serving throughout the entire conflict, and 
since that period they have always borne an active part in all local 
affairs of the community in which they lived. The family lineage, 
for the purposes of this review, begins with the Revolutionary an- 
cestor, John Leavell, who moved from Virginia to Kentucky about 
1790. His son, Robert Leavell, was born in Virginia, moved with 
his parents to Kentucky, and in 181 1 removed to Wayne county, 
Indiana, taking up a claim of 120 acres of land, upon which is 
located a part of the village of Jacksonburg. He served as a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812. He laid out the village of Jacksonburg and 
remained there until about 183 1, when he moved to a place about 
one mile north of Hagerstown, where he purchased 231 acres of 
land, the same now being owned by Adam Rowe and II. C. Knode. 
There Robert Leavell and his wife, Sarah, born in Virginia, spent 
the remainder of their lives, he dying in 1847, at the a ge of seventy- 
one years, and she in 1857, at lne a 8' e of seventy-five years. They 
were the parents of ten children: Elizabeth, born in 1801, mar- 
ried John Scott and had a son, Joshua; Gabriel died in childhood; 
James, born in 1804, married Elizabeth Cooper, of Wayne county, 
in an early day removed to Tipton county, where he entered 120 
acres of government land and remained there the residue of his 
life; Benjamin was the next in order of birth; Ezekiel, born in 
1808, married Sarah A. Bales, a native of Wayne county, and of 
East Tennessee parentage, and they had six children — Margaret 
E., John II., Lorinda J., Benjamin F., Thomas J., and William M., 
and after the death of the mother Ezekiel again married, of which 
union were born three children — Sarah F., Dora, and Lorain L. ; 
Caroline, born in 181 1, married Lewis Jones at the age of eighteen 
years and died soon thereafter; Mary, born in 1813, died in child- 
hood; Malinda, born in 1815, was married, Jan. 7, 1836, to Carter 
T. Jackson, a native of Kentucky, and with him, in 1838, removed 
to Tipton county, where she died in 1873, having reared a family 
of six sons and three daughters; Nancy, born in 1817, in Wayne 



BIOGRAPHICAL 563 

county, married Dory Matthews, of Marion county, and died soon 
thereafter; and Sarah, born in 1819, married Newton J. Jackson, 
moved to Tipton county in 1838, and died in the prime of life, leav- 
ing two children. Benjamin Leavell, the father of John \V., was 
born in Fayette county, Kentucky, Nov. 6, 1806, and in 181 1 came 
with his parents to Wayne county, where he was reared to man- 
hood. In January, 184 1, he removed to Tipton county and settled 
on 160 acres of land, which he cleared, putting 100 acres in a state 
of cultivation and erecting the necessary buildings. All this he 
accomplished within a period of ten years by his own efforts, and 
his was one of the first brick residences in that count}'. lie ac- 
cumulated 340 acres of land in Tipton- county and resided there 
until 'his death, Oct. 29, 1868. His wife, Fanny (Thornburgh) 
Leavell, was burn on her father's farm, three miles north of 1 lagers- 
town, Nov. 8, 1 82 1, daughter of William and Martha Thornburgh, 
natives of East Tennessee who removed to Wayne county in 1816, 
and her death occurred Dec. 14, 1893, m Tipton county. To Benja- 
min Leavell and wife were born seven children: John W. is the 
eldest; Martha R., born in April, 1844, was married in 1862 to John 
O. Green, who died in 1867, after the birth of two children — Ben- 
jamin Ik and Maude E. (deceased) — and a few years later Martha 
married Jasper N. Wright, a native of Wayne county, and of that 
union were born two sons — Gilbert and Jesse ; Losada J., born in 
August, 1846, married C. H. Hobbs, and the)' have five children — 
Nellie, Minnie, Thomas B., Melvin W., and Guy; Nancy V., born 
in October, 1848, married John Hobbs in 1867, and they have six 
children — Nettie, Maude, Benjamin A., Morton, Fred B., and Chal- 
mer L. ; Sarah E., born in January, 1852, was married in 1872 to 
T. B. Bates, deceased, and of their union were born two daugh- 
ters — Ora and Mabel ; Mary E., born in May, 1856, married Lemuel 
Darrow in March, 1S73, and they have four children — Fannie, Ollie, 
Omar, and Mary; and Josephine, born in August, 1859, is the wife 
of W. S. Roberson, of Elwood, Ind. John W. Leavell was born 
and reared on a farm, where he worked until twenty-two years of 
age. His education was acquired at the district schools, through 
his attendance during the winter months. After leaving the farm 
he learned the tanner's trade, which occupation he followed until 
1877, at which time lie purchased eighty acres of unimproved land 
in Tipton county, to which he afterward added until he owned 280 
acres. He became actively interested in public affairs and in the 
spring of 18S1 was appointed one of the ditch commissioners for 
Tipton county, in which capacity he assisted in surveying and lo- 
cating fifty-five drains, and he served in that position eighteen 
months. In November, 18S2, he was elected sheriff of Tipton coun- 
ty by ninety-six majority, on the Republican ticket, although the 
county was Democratic by about 400 votes. Since the death of his 
wife he has resided at the home of his son in Jefferson township, 
this county. Fraternally, Mr. Leavell has been a member of the 
Masonic lodge at Elwood since 1866, and while never affiliated, 
with any church association is a true follower of the principles of 
religion and takes a profound interest in all movements which look 



564 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

to the furtherance of the intellectual, moral and spiritual well- 
being of his fellow men. In March, 1862, he was married to Miss 
Molcy Beeson, daughter of James and Sarah Beeson, natives of 
North Carolina who were brought to Wayne county by their par- 
ents in 1808, and five children blessed this happy union: Dora B., 
born in December, 1862, married Z. E. Darrow and died in Septem- 
ber, 1908, the mother of two children — Lola Maude (deceased), 
and Cecil Howard; William T. was born in January, 1865; Ben- 
jamin, born in October, 1867, and now in the real estate and loan 
business in Tipton count)', married Nettie Mavity and they have 
two daughters — Dora B. and Bernice; Cora M., born in July, 1870, 
died at the age of eight years; and Leolitas, born in November, 
1872, married Minnie Fouch, in 1896, and they have four daugh- 
ters — Mary E., Ruth, Nina, and Geraldine. Mrs. Molcy (Beeson) 
'Leavell was born in Madison county, Indiana, May 8, 1842, her 
death occurring at her home in Tipton county, Sept. 12, 1909. She 
was a loving wife, a devoted mother, and a woman of excellent 
traits of character, which endeared her to her family and a wide 
circle of friends. William T. Leavell, the eldest son, was born in 
Tipton county, educated in the district schools, and worked upon 
his father's farm until arriving at man's estate. He was married 
to Capitola Nance, a daughter of Theodore and Lovica (Parker) 
Nance, of Tipton, Ind. He then rented 160 acres of land in Tipton 
county and followed dairying and farming until 1888, when he 
moved to his father's farm and there followed the same lines of 
industry until 1892. The father then sold that farm and William 
T. purchased eighty-seven acres west of Tipton and remained there 
nine years, engaged in general farming. In 1899 ne s °ld that place 
and removed to Wayne county, purchasing 160 acres of land in 
Jefferson township, about one and one-half miles northwest of 
Hagerstown, wdiere he has since followed general farming. To 
him and his wife have been born two children — John T., born July 
12, 1887, and Fred, born Feb. 18, 1896. John T., a farmer in Jeffer- 
son township, was married in November, 1904, to Bertha Turnpaw 
and they have three children: Mary Imogene, born May 22, 1906; 
Molcy Bernetha, born Ma)' 4, 1908; and Harold Leon, born March 
18, 1910. Mrs. William T. Leavell was born Nov. 16, 1868. 

Harry Fremont Ewbank is an able representative of the benef- 
icent industry of agriculture and is successfully established in that 
occupation in New Garden township. He is specially skilled in the 
industry and in the technical knowledge pertaining to its applica- 
tion, and by this reason has been most successful. Mr. Ewbank is 
a native of Wayne township, this county, born July 31, 1855, a son 
of Thomas and Hannah (King) Ewbank, the former born in Dear- 
born county, Indiana, in 1827, and the latter in Wayne county in 
1829. The great-grandfather, John Ewbank, came from England 
to Dearborn county in September, 181 1, purchased a section of 
land and added to his possessions until he owned 1,000 acres. The 
paternal grandfather, Thomas Ewbank, was an Englishman by 
birth, coming with his father and settled in Dearborn count)', In- 
diana, where he died in 1857. The father, also named Thomas 



BIOGRAPHICAL 565 

Ewbank, was reared and educated in his native county, where his 
early training was in connection with the work of the home farm. 
He followed agricultural pursuits in Dearborn county until 185 1 
and thereafter was a resident uf Wayne county during the remain- 
der of his active business career. He was a man of industry, energy, 
and inflexible integrity ami was held in high esteem in the com- 
munity which represented his home. He passed to the life eternal, 
Feb. 1, 1900. He was married to Hannah King, in 1846, his wife 
being a daughter of Levinus King, and of this union were born 
thirteen children: Levinus, born in 1848; Charles, born in 1849, 
died in 1854; William Albert, born in 1852, died in 1854; Elizabeth, 
born in 1853, married Benjamin Sharp, in February, 1S75; Harry F. 
is the next in order uf birth; Frank, born in 1857, died in 1891; 
Norman, born in 1859; James S., born in 1860; Magdaline, born in 
1863; Mary, born in 1865, died in infancy, as did also Marcellus, 
born in 1866, and Esther, born in 1870; and Wilson 1\, born in 
1871, was killed by a falling tree in 1901. Harry F. Ewbank gained 
his preliminary educational discipline in the public school on the 
Coggeshall farm in Webster township, and at the Olive school and 
the Concord school, attending until seventeen years old. At the 
age of twenty he began his independent career, working by the 
month as a farm hand until 1879, and in 1S91 purchased the farm 
which he occupies in Xew Garden township. In company with his 
son he has also conducted a grocery store in Fairview six years. 
Mr. Ewbank is independent in his political views. On July 9, 1879, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Jane Miller, born Jan. 17, 
1862, daughter of David (deceased) and Rachel Malinda Miller, 
prominent and influential citizens of Center township. Mrs. Miller 
is now residing with her children. Of this union were born six chil- 
dren : Charles Clifford, born Sept. 10, 1880, married Estella Dick- 
inson, in Richmond, and is in partnership with his father in the gro- 
cery business; Oliver Elbert, born Nov. 24, 1882, married Monna 
Lee, of Fountain City, and is connected with the grocery; Eddie 
Wilbur, bom Ala)- 30, 1888, resides on the farm of his father; Irma 
Hazel, born Feb. 17, 1892, died Aug. 15, 1910; Esther King, born 
July 25, 1895, and Marian Alice, horn July 3, 1901, are at home. 
Charles C. and wife have four children — Vernon, Helen, Wilbur, 
and Myron; and to Oliver and wife have been born two children — 
Reba, who died in childhood, and Velma C. Mr. and Mrs. Ewbank 
enjoy the social life of the community and their home is a center of 
generous hospitality. They are members of the Friends' church. 
Joseph I. Helms. — No family in Wayne county is held in 
higher regard or is better known that that of which Joseph I. 
Helms is a representative in the fourth generation, and when it is 
stated that his paternal great-grandfather settled here in the Terri- 
torial days it becomes evident that the family name has been iden- 
tified with the annals of the county from the earliest recorded 
time — in fact, it has been linked with the civic and industrial his- 
tory of this favored section of the State for a century. It has stood 
for the highest type of citizenship as one generation has followed 
another onto the stage of life's activities, and those who have borne 



566 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

it have contributed in a large measure to the development and 
upbuilding- of what is now an opulent and populous county. Joseph 
I. Helms, living- in Abington township, was born in that township, 
Aug. 19, 1874, a son of Michael Helms (see sketch) and is the eld- 
est of four children. He is indebted to the public schools of Ab- 
ington township for his early educational discipline and his initial 
services in the held of practical endeavor were rendered on the farm 
of his father. He was thus employed until twenty-one years old, 
when he worked one year for his father as a hired man and then 
operated his father's farm two years. Then, having married, he- 
co-operated in the management of his father-in-law's place two 
years, at the end of which period he purchased the farm where he 
resides and which consists of 160 acres of land adjoining Center 
township. He operates this farm in a general way, including stock 
raising, and makes a specialty of Poland China hogs, fie devotes 
his entire time to the farm, which is one of the best equipped in 
the township, and his modern residence was built in the summer of 
1905, the barn being erected in 1908. In politics, Mr. Helms is 
aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican 
part)', and is at present a member of the Wayne County Council 
and also present chairman of Abington township. He is affiliated 
with Hiram bodge, No. 417, Free and Accepted Masons, at Cen- 
terville, being Worshipful Master in 191 1. Aug. 3, 1898, recorded 
the marriage of Mr. Helms to Miss Maud E. Fender, born in Ab- 
ington township, Nov. 20, 1876, a daughter of Milbern L. and Fran- 
ces (Wood) Fender, the former born in Abington township, May 
7, 1848, and the latter in Center township, north of Centerville, 
June 11, 1854. The father became a land owner in Wayne county 
and devoted his time to general farming. About 1904 he moved 
to Centerville, where he lived retired until his death, April 18, 1908. 
Mrs. Helms was his only child. Henry L. Fender, paternal grand- 
father of Mrs. Helms, was born on the farm where he resides, May 
12, 1827, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Long) Fender, natives of 
North Carolina, the former born in 1779 and the latter in 1780. 
Henry Fender was a land owner in North Carolina but disposed of 
his holdings there and came to Indiana in 181 1, settling in Boston 
township, Wayne county, where he resided two years, and then, 
in 181 3, came to the farm where his son, Henry E., resides. The 
surrounding country was then a wilderness and there was no settle- 
ment between his farm and Noland's Fork, or what is known as 
the "Doddridge Settlement." Henry Fender began clearing his 
land and spent the residue of his life here, dying July 8, 1863, his 
wife having died in 1861. They were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren, Henry L. being the youngest and the only one living. 

Elihu Hiatt, residing in the township of Abington after a busy 
career as an agriculturist, was born in Darke county, Ohio, June 
24, 1839, son °f Jabez and Anna (Sullivan) Hiatt, natives of North 
Carolina. Jabez Hiatt removed to Ohio in an early day and after 
a residence there of a few years came to Wayne county and settled 
in Franklin township, where he became a land owner and continued 
to reside until his death, in 1874. His wife passed away some 



BIOGRAPHICAL , 567 

years later, at the age of eighty-eight years. They were the par- 
ents of seven children, only two of whom are living, and Elihu is 
the eldest. William, a younger brother, is a farmer and resides in 
New Garden township. Elihu Iliatt attended school in District 
No. 2 of Franklin township and also a short time at Bethel school. 
Since leaving school he has had no other interest than agriculture, 
in which he lias been actively engaged. At the age of nineteen he 
rented a farm in Franklin township and at the time of his father's 
death inherited sixty acres of the old homestead. A number of 
years later he purchased the remainder of the old homestead, which 
increased his farm to 133 acres, and this he traded for an eighty- 
acre farm in Franklin township, where he resided about three years. 
lie then sold that tract and lived practically retired until 1902, 
since which time he has resided on a farm of thirty-four acres in 
Abington township. In his political convictions Mr. Hiatt has been 
unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican part}', though he 
has never aspired to hold official position. On Nov. 5, 1S57, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hiatt and Miss Martha Ann Tharp, 
born in Franklin township, in November, 1841, daughter of John 
ami Anna 1'. ( Al iddleton ) Thar]), born in North Carolina. They 
came to Franklin township in an early day and located near Bethel, 
where they lived on a farm the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Iliatt 
died, having become the mother of three children: Mary Adeline, 
born Nov. 16, 1858, is the wife of Frank D. Crawford, a carpenter 
in Richmond; Oliver I'. Morton, born Aug. [3, 18(13, is a truck- 
farmer and resides at Greenville, Ohio; and Anna May, bom June 
3, 1866, is the wife of Eugene Anderson, a farmer residing three 
miles southeast of Richmond. On June 25, 1902, Mr. Iliatt was 
married to Mrs. Francena (Helms) McConaha, born in Abington 
township, Dec. 25, 1845, daughter of Isaiah Helms (see sketch of 
Michael Helms). Airs. Iliatt was first married, Sept. 6, 1866, to Eouis 
McConaha, born in Center township, Oct. 10, 1845, son °f Thomas 
and Christina (Kramer) McConaha (see sketch of Thomas McCon- 
aha). Louis McConaha died Oct. 31, 1877, the father of five chil- 
dren: Isaiah, born May 4, 1868, died June 26, 1890; Minnie E., 
bom June 2j, 1869, is the wife of James Wilson, a farmer residing 
four miles north of Liberty, in Cnion county; Elizabeth Jane, 
born Feb. 27, 1872, is the wife of John G. Klinger, of Richmond; 
Joseph .Arthur, born April 27, 1874, is a mechanic and resides in 
West Richmond; and Phebe Eveline, born Oct. 8, 1875, is the wife 
of Milton S. Kinder, a grocer in Richmond. Mr. McConaha was a 
farmer during his active career and his widow continued a resident 
of Abington township until her marriage with Air. Iliatt. Air. and 
Airs. Hiatt are members of the Alethodist Episcopal church at Lo- 
cust Grove. 

Harlan Parker Jarrett, a native son of Abington township and 
one of the prosperous farmers of that community, was born Oct. 
2, 1852, son of James AI. and Sarah Ann (Robbins) Jarrett, natives 
of Abington township, the former born Nov. 15, 1825, and the lat- 
ter, May 8, 1826 The father in early life was a farmer and stock 
dealer, at which he was for a number of years successfully engaged. 



568 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

When his father died, in 1848, he purchased the interest of the 
other heirs in the parent's estate and afterward became one of the 
most extensive buyers and shippers of stock in Wayne county. 
He also became an extensive land owner, owning land in other 
parts of the county and also in Iowa, where his possessions 
amounted to 200 acres, and he devoted the major portion of his 
life exclusively to the stock business, in early times shipping to 
the Eastern markets, but later to Indianapolis and Chicago. He 
served with the Home Guards at the time of the Morgan raid,- and 
served as justice of the peace and was elected township trustee, 
but died before taking the office, in February, 1895. To him and 
his wife were born four children: Mattie, born in 1847, died in 
1871 ; Emily, born Sept. 26, 1848, is the wife of Dr. Gabel, of Cen- 
terville; Harlan P. is the next in order of birth; and William M., 
born March iS, 1856, is a farmer and resides in Abington township 
Harlan P. Jarrett received his education in the schools of District 
No. 3, in his native township, and continued with his father until 
about twenty-five years old. for several years as a partner with the 
parent and the younger brother, lie then moved to the farm 
where he resides and for a few years engaged in the stock busi- 
ness. Since becoming the owner of this place he has devoted his 
energies to scientific and progressive agriculture, and his measure 
of success is best evinced by his high standing in the community. 
While engaged in the stock business he traveled over a large part 
of this country, but never became a resident of any place but Ab- 
ington township. He has 115.5 acres of land, does general farm- 
ing and raises stock and grain of all kinds. Politically, Mr. Jar- 
rett gives his support to the men and measures of the Republican 
party, but has never sought official honors for himself. lie and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. On June 
27, 1S77, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Jarrett and Miss Celia 
Fender, daughter of Leborn L. and Rebecca (Connard) Fender, of 
Abington township. Mrs. Jarrett was born on the farm where she 
now resides, Aug. 31, 1857. Her father, Leborn L. Fender, was a 
lifelong resident of Wayne county. lie was born on the farm where 
his daughter resides, Feb. 3, 1835. On Oct. 22, 1856, he married 
Rebecca Connard, born in Ohio, June 2T,, 1830, and continued to 
reside on the old homestead until his death, Oct. 10, 1859, having 
lived an honorable and upright life in all his dealings with his fel- 
low men. whose confidence and esteem he commanded to the last. 
Mrs. Jarrett is the only child of these parents. After the father 
died the mother continued to reside on the homestead until she be- 
came the wife of Joseph Yager, and she died Oct. 28, 1903. Four 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Jarrett : Jesse Fender, born 
Nov. 6, 1879, married Edith McCowan, of Centerville, resides in 
Richmond, and they have two children — Ruth E., born Dec. 7, 
1898, and Howard Parker, born April 4, 1910; Estella Alice, born 
Dec. 21, 1881, is the wife of Perry C. Shadle ("see sketch); James 
W., born Sept. 27, 1886, married Pearl Hoppus, of Liberty, Union 
county, Indiana, is a farmer and resides in Abington township,, and 
they have one daughter, Celia Bell, born Oct. 20, 1910; and Wil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 569 

Ham R., born Feb. 18, 1889, married Delia Stinson, of Abington 
township, resides on a farm adjoining the old homestead, and 
they have two children — Walter James, born Oct. 7, 1907, and 
Hazel Josephine, born June 8, 1910. Jacob Fender, paternal grand- 
father of Mrs. Jarrett, was bom in North Carolina, Jan. 28, 1806, 
sun of Henry and Elizabeth (Fang) Fender, natives of North Caro- 
lina, the former born in 1787 and the latter in 1789. In October, 
181 1, his parents came to Wayne county, Indiana, and settled in 
the southern part, or in what is now Union county. In 1814 they 
removed 10 what is now Abington township, entered loo acres of 
land and built a log cabin. They were members and zealous work- 
ers in the Methodist Episcopal church and their house was used 
as a place of worship before a church was built. They had a fam- 
ily of eleven children — Jonathan, Gabriel, Susannah, Jacob, Little- 
ton, Sarah, John H., Lydia, Sophia, Mary Ann. and Henry L. 
Jacob Fender was married Nov. 3, 1829, to Betsy Ann Holland, 
born in Wayne county, Jan. 9, 181 1, daughter of Elijah Holland, of 
English descent. After his marriage he purchased 120 acres of 
land in Abington township, the same being that now occupied by 
Mr. Jarrett. He was a generous man and assisted many. He died 
March 2, 1904, and his wile passed away June 17, 1887. Of their 
union was born a son, Leborn L., the father of Mrs. Jarrett. 

William Smoker is a leading farmer of the township of Abing- 
ton, where he lias been engaged in the successful conduct of agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout all of his career, and both as a tiller 
of the soil and a citizen is held in high esteem by his associates. 
Mr. Smoker was born Nov. 13, 1856, one and one-half miles north 
of Abington, in Abington township, son of Amos and Mary (Brum- 
field ) Smoker, the former born in Union county, one-half mile 
southwest of Abington, and the latter in Abington township, one- 
half mile north of Abington. The father was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and followed agricultural pursuits exclusively in Abington 
township until a few months before his death, when he went to 
his boyhood home in Union county. He was born Sept. 27, 1832, 
and died in January, 1859, and the mother was bom July 7, 1834, 
and is still a resident of Abington township. The father was very 
successful in his endeavors during his short but active career. To 
him and his good wife were born two children : Eliza, who is the 
wife of John Sullivan, of Centerville, and William. The son re- 
ceived his preliminary education in the excellent schools of Abing- 
ton township and resided with his mother until twenty-six years 
old. He then purchased land adjoining the old homestead and 
upon that tract resided about twenty-six years, at the end of which 
period he purchased the farm where he resides. He has added to 
his belongings from time to time until he has 288 acres, all in 
Abington township, and in addition to this he and his family oper- 
ate land rented from others. Beginning in early manhood, he oper- 
ated a threshing outfit seventeen seasons. The religious faith of 
himself and wife is expressed by affiliation with the Christian 
church at Abington, and in politics he skives a consistent support 
to the men and measures of the Republican party. Mr. Smoker 



570 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

was married April 13, 1881, to Miss Mary E. Dye, and this union 
has been blessed by the birth of four children: Gale H., born 
March 20, 1885, married Mamie Lamott and resides on his father's 
farm in Abington township ; Walter E., born Jan. 10, 1888, was mar- 
ried Nov. 9, 1910, to Miss Goldie Higgins, daughter of Joshua M. and 
Eliza J. (Angleton) Higgins. and resides in Abington township; Os- 
car R., born March 4, 1890, resides at the parental home ; and 1 horn- 
as E., born Aug. 18, 1892, was married Dec. 28, 1910, to Miss Ruby 15. 
Miller, daughter of Charles D. Miller (see sketch). Mrs. Srnoker 
was born in Abington township, Oct. 27, 1863, daughter of Ander- 
son and Elizabeth (Manning) Dye, born in Abington township, the 
father on June 5, 1826, and the mother on July 29, 1827. The father 
was always a fanner, though he engaged in saw milling for a time 
in early life. He became a land owner and operated a farm in 
Abington township many years, dying in November, 1882, and the 
mother is now living with a son at Urbana, Ohio.. They were the 
parents of twelve children: Charles is deceased; William is a 
farmer and resides at Urbana, Ohio ; James is a farmer and resides 
at Urbana, Ohio; Joseph resides in Columbus, Ohio; Mahlon is de- 
ceased; Joshua is a farmer and resides in Abington township; Mrs. 
Smoker is the next in order of birth; Thomas is in the insurance 
and real estate business at ITbaua, Ohio; Sarah Luella is the wife 
of Stephen A. Ryan, of Richmond; Carrie A. is the wife of Nathan 
T. Colvin (see sketch) ; Isaac M. is engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business at Urbana, Ohio; and Emma is deceased. 

Jesse David Kinder was one of the honored citizens and prom- 
inent business men of Abington township, where he maintained his 
home a number of years, and where he was engaged in the mercan- 
tile business until his death, March 9, 1902. His career was char- 
acterized by signal integrity of purpose as well as by well directed 
industry, and he gained not only a position of independence, but 
was also a citizen well worthy of the unqualified esteem in which 
he was held. Mr. Kinder was a native of L'nion county, Indiana, 
born near Philomath, Jan. 1, 1861, a son of Frank and Caroline 
(George) Kinder, born in l'nion county. Frank Kinder, who fol- 
lowed the saw mill and threshing business during his active career, 
is living retired in the village of Abington, and the mother died in 
1879. They were the parents of five children: Jesse D. was the 
eldest; Anchor is the wife of Emanuel Leistner, of Philomath, 
Union county; William is a thresher and farmer and resides south- 
west of Philomath ; Lafayette is a thresher and resides in Philo- 
math ; and Milton S. is a grocer in Richmond. Jesse D. Kinder 
was indebted to the public schools of L'nion county for his early 
educational discipline, lie was reared to maturity in that county 
and there his initial efforts in his independent career were made as 
an employe of his father in a saw mill. He was thus engaged some 
time anil then followed the threshing business until he came to 
Abington and purchased the general store, which was then being 
conducted by a Mr. Weaver. From then until his death he devoted 
his attention to the mercantile business. His political allegiance 
was given to the Democratic party, whose cause he espoused upon 



BIOGRAPHICAL 57 1 

becoming a voter, and he was called upon to serve as township as- 
sessor one term. On June 27, 1887, Mr. Kinder was united in wed- 
lock to Miss Rose G. Stephens, born in the village of Abington, 
June 17, 1868, daughter of Thomas B. and Lavina ( Whittinger) 
Stephens, and of this union were born two children: Roscoe, born 
Dec. 21, 1894, and Cuba, born Aug. 13, 1901. Since the death of 
her husband Mrs. Kinder has continued the mercantile business. 
Mr. Kinder was a member of the Masonic order, Lodge No. 232, 
and also of Abington Lodge, No. 406, Knights of Pythias. Thomas 
B. Stephens, the father of Mrs. Kinder, was born in Pennsylvania, 
in 1824, and the mother was born in Union county, Indiana, in 
June, 1827. The father was a blacksmith in his early life and came 
to Indiana with his parents in 1830, settling in Abington township, 
where he later established a shop and followed his trade until a 
few years before his death, in 1905. lie and his good wife were 
the parents of eight children: Elizabeth became the wife of John 
Davis, of Anderson, and is deceased; Louisa is the wife of William 
Collins, of Anderson; Francis resides in the village of Abington; 
John resides in Abington and assists Mrs. Kinder in the manage- 
ment of the store ; William is deceased ; Carrie is the widow of Orris 
F. Wood and resides in the village of Abington; Grant is a farmer 
and resides in Southern Kansas; and Mrs. Kinder is the youngest 
of the children. 

John Dye has been a resident of Wayne county since infancy 
and is a member of one of the well known pioneer families of this 
section of the State. He has retired largely from the arduous labors 
and responsibilities which marked so many years of his life, but still 
conducts a general grocery and supply store, notions, etc., with a 
feed barn in connection, in the village of Abington. He was born 
near Philomath, Union county, Indiana, Sept. 15, 1835, and, though 
he has passed the psalmist's span of three score years and ten, is 
well preserved in mental and physical faculties and takes a lively 
interest in the affairs of the day and the general supervision of his 
business. He is a son of Joshua and Alary (Nicholas; Dye, the for- 
mer born in the western part of Kentucky, Jan. 22, 1807, and the 
latter in Ohio, about i8to. The father came to Indiana with his 
parents in 1810, and they located on a farm near Abington, in the 
edge of Union county. A few years later they removed to a farm 
a few miles west, in the same county. The paternal grandfather 
served as a soldier in the war of 1812, under Captain Farlow, in 
General McFarland's brigade. Joshua Dye, the father, moved into 
Wayne count}-, in 1830, and in partnership with a brother pur- 
chased eighty acres of land lying west of Abington. Later, he sold 
his interest in this tract to his brother and purchased fifty acres 
near by. lie resided on this tract sixteen years and then added 
fifty acres adjoining, and later forty acres more. He reclaimed con- 
siderable of his land from the forest wilds, in the meanwhile living 
up to the full tension of the pioneer days. In 1854 he sold his land 
and removed to Abington, where he built the residence in which 
his son John lives. In 1861 he built a store room in connection with 
the residence and was in Cincinnati, buying goods, the day that 



572 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Fort Sumter was fired upon. He continued in the mercantile busi- 
ness until his death, which occurred Aug. 8, 1881, at which time 
he had attained to the patriarchal age of seventy-four years, six 
months and sixteen days. If is devoted wife and helpmeet passed 
away in October, 1878. In the early days the lather did consider- 
able huckstering', stock dealing', etc. John Dye was an infant of 
less than a year old at the time when his parents took up then- 
residence in Wayne county and completed his early educational 
discipline in a log school-house then known as the "Stephens 
School-house," in Abington township, where he was reared to man's 
estate. lie continued to be associated with his father in the various 
enterprises of that parent until the latter died, although he had 
in the meantime purchased a house and two lots in Abington. 
After the death of his parents he purchased the old homestead and 
has continued in the mercantile business, also superintending a 
small farm which he owns near the village. His political allegiance 
is given to the Democratic part}', in whose faith he was reared, 
and both he and his wife are zealous supporters of the Christian 
church at Abington. He is a member of Abington Lodge, No. 406, 
Knights of Pythias. On April 15, 1864, Mr. Dye was united in 
married to Miss Susanna VVhitmer, daughter of Rudolph and 
Nancy (Stevens) Whitmer, of L'nion count}-. Mrs. Dye was born 
near Brownsville, Union count)-, in 1847, and of this union were 
born four children: Edward E., who resides in Richmond, married 
Ruby Kenneth and they have two sons — Floyd and Wilkie ; Min- 
nie E. became the wife of William Amiel and is deceased, leaving 
one child, Orville; Cora N. is the wife of Frederick Sanford, of 
Clark's Lake, Mich. ; and Lulu died in infancy. Mrs. Dye was 
summoned to the life eternal in 1871, and on March 20, 1873, Mr. 
Dye married Miss Sarah J. Shelby, born in Hancock county, March 
20, 1847, daughter of Joshua and Nancy (Dunn) Shelby, former 
residents of Wayne county who removed to Hancock county, where 
they both died. Of this second marriage were born two children: 
Burton Albert, deceased; and Franklin C, who is a truck farmer 
and resides in the village of Abington, is married to Alta Colvin. 
Benjamin Jarvis Hunt, deceased, was a native son of Wayne 
county, born on the farm where his widow resides, in Abington 
township, Dec. 27, 1835. H e was a son OI Charles and Lucinda 
(Jarvis) Hunt, natives of Wayne county, the father born on the 
before mentioned farm, June 17, 1813, and the mother in Boston 
township, in February, 1814. The paternal grandfather, Timothy 
Hunt, was born in 1771, and the grandmother in 1777, and they 
carrie to Indiana from Ohio, settling on the farm which is the resi- 
dence of the widow of Benjamin J. Hunt. There were nine sons in 
their family and they all became useful citizens of Wayne county. 
The parents of Benjamin J. Hunt were married in this county and, 
the grandfather dying in 1816, Charles remained with his mother 
until her death. He then established himself on the old homestead 
and devoted himself to reclaiming the same to cultivation. He 
continued his residence on this homestead until his death, Aug. 14, 
1899. His wife passed away Dec. 2, 1891. To these parents were 



BIOGRAPHICAL 573 

born three children, of which Benjamin J. was the eldest, Timothy 
died when a young man, and William resides in Richmond. Ben- 
jamin J. Hunt received his preliminary educational discipline in the 
district schools of Abington township, later attended the Richmond 
High School, also what is now known as the Garfield School, the 
old Greenmount College, a German school at Liberty, Ind., and the 
Normal at Lebanon, Ohio. When nineteen years old he began 
teaching in Abington township, teaching his first term at the vil- 
lage of Abington, and continued in that occupation many years. 
Being compelled to quit teaching because of the condition of his 
health, he settled on a farm which he had purchased, across the 
line in Union count)', and there resided fourteen years. At the end 
of that period he returned to the old homestead and there resided 
the residue of his life, dying Feb. 27, 1890. On March 23, 1859, was 
solemnized Mr. Hunt's marriage to Miss Valera Henderson, born 
July 23, 1837, in Clermont county, Ohio. She is a daughter of 
Jackson and Maria (Read) Henderson, natives of Clermont county, 
where they lived out their lives and died when Mrs. Hunt was a 
child. She came to Indiana with Powell Slade, who still resides in 
Abington township, and with his family resided until married. 
She has a brother, Lafayette Henderson, who resides in Oklahoma. 
Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Hunt has remained on the 
home farm. Mr. Hunt was a Republican in his political adherency 
and as the representative of that party gave efficient service one 
term as trustee of Abington township. He enjoyed fraternal rela- 
tions with the Masonic order, and as is also his widow, was a worthy 
and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
denomination he officiated as a local preacher. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hunt were born seven children: Charles, born Jan. 1, i860, died 
in 1899; Edwin resides with his mother; Jesse married Anna Pad- 
dock and resides near Lewisville, Ind.; Loretta is the wife of 
Thomas E. Wynn, of Richmond; Millie is the wife of George Crow, 
of Abington township ; William married Otie Webber and resides 
with his mother; and Frank married Flossie Stinson and also re- 
sides at the old homestead. 

Robert B. Colvin, farmer, was born near the_ county line, in 
Union county, Indiana, Oct. 21,, 1848. His parents were Thomas J. 
and Rebecca (Bennett) Colvin (see sketch of Josiah B. Colvin). 
Robert B. Colvin attended a school in Abington, in the old factory 
building which was used for school purposes, and later attended a 
school in Smithfield, held in an old dwelling house, and also at- 
tended school in a log school-house in Union county, and after 
the removal of the family to Randolph county, in 1861, attended 
school there. When about twenty years old he began his inde- 
pendent career as a farm hand, in which capacity he was engaged 
about three years. Pie then rented a farm near the county line, 
in Union county, and resided there one year. When the father died, 
in May, 1874, each of the five sons were given twenty acres of land, 
and Robert B. and his brother, William H., traded their tracts 
for a farm of seventy-five acres, to which they later added forty 
acres adjoining by purchase, and Robert B. resided thereon until 



574 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

1880, when he disposed of his interest to his brother. He then 
purchased the farm where he now resides and is one of the prac- 
tical farmers of this county. His farm consists of 120 acres and he 
operates it in a general way. He was a member of the Home 
Guards during the Civil war. Politically, our subject is a Re- 
publican and has served as a member of the township advisory 
board. On Jan. 26, 1873, Mr. Colvin was united in marriage to 
Miss Barbara Railsback, bom in Abington township, Nov. 19, 
1852, daughter of Nathan Railsback (see sketch of Josiah B. Col- 
vin). Of this union were born eight children: Mattie, born March 
5, 1874, is the wife of Charles Taylor; Alta Lucena, born Jan. 31, 
1876, is the wife of Frank Dye, a farmer of Abington township; 
Charles Marl, born June 21, 1879, married Laura Grimes and after 
her death was wedded to Macey Turner, and is a farmer in Abing- 
ton township; Murray Lafayette, born March 2J, 1881, married 
Myra Helms, is a farmer and resides in Preble county, Ohio; Es- 
tella Pearl, born Sept. 19, 1883, i s the w ^ e oi Clarence Lybrook, a 
farmer of Preble county, Ohio ; Nellie Rebecca, born March 20, 
1885, is the wife of Chester Davis, of Abington ; Bertha Leota, born 
March 7, 1887, is the wife of Clarence Ham, a farmer residing north 
of Richmond; and Marie Elsie, born Aug. 26, 1894, resides at the 
parental home. 

William K. Cheesman, who for a score of years has been con- 
nected with the agricultural industry in Center township, which 
political division of the county he has served as trustee, was born 
in Webster township, May 31, 1863. His father, Alexander Chees- 
man, was a native of New Jersey, born in 181 1, and his mother, 
Nancy (Vinedge) Cheesman, was born in Center township, Wayne 
county, Indiana. The father came to Wayne county in 1820, the 
family having immigrated, in 1819, to Delaware county, where the 
father died, and the mother and children then located in Richmond. 
In his youth Alexander Cheesman worked for others for a time and 
then became a land owner in Webster township, where he resided 
until his death, with the exception of about nine months, in 1875, 
when he resided in Centerville. The father died in August, 1891, 
and the mother passed away in October, 1896. They were the par- 
ents of two children, of whom William K. is the elder, and Lennie 
Leota is the wife of James F. Harris (see sketch). The father had 
been previously married, of which union were born eight children, 
and the mother, at the time of her marriage to Mr. Cheesman, was 
the widow of William Kern (see sketch of Daniel B. Medearis). 
William K. Cheesman was educated in the schools of Center town- 
ship and also attended, during the winters of 1880 and 1881, a 
normal school in Hendricks county. In 1883 he rented his father's 
farm, upon which he resided until 1892, when he purchased the 
place where he resides and which consists of 145 acres. Here he 
has resided continuously since, with the exception of three years, 
during which his official duties as trustee of Center township caused 
him to establish his residence in Centerville. Politically, Air. Chees- 
man is a member of the Republican party, but has had no time to 
court public office, other than that of township trustee, already 



O/O 



mentioned, ami while living in Webster township served as asses- 
sor. Socially, he is a member of the Masonic order and also has 
membership in the Knight- of I'ythias, the Independent Order of 
Odd Kellows, and the 'Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie 666; at 
Richmond, in all of which he has filled official positions. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. On May 31, i88, v was 
celebrated the marriage of Mr. Cheesman ami Mi-- l.etitia Culbert- 
son, born in Webster township, Wig. 25, 1866, daughter of Wil- 
liam ami Mary Jane (Kbersol) Culbertson (see sketch of William 
( ulbcrtMin 1 . ami of this union there is a son, Earl, born Oct. 29, 
1892. 

Joshua Newton Swallow is a member of a lamih whose name 
has been identified with the annals of Wayne county -nice the pio- 
neer era of i t ^ history, ami here he i> one of the representative 
members of the farming community of Abington township, where 
he is the owner of a well improved landed estate of sixty-five acres. 
He was born at \bington. Wayne county, Dec. 17, 18+3, a -on of 
John and \'anc\ I Dye) Swallow, the former born in Kentucky, in 
1817, and the latter in Abington township, in [82 >. The father was 
reared on a farm, but became a practicing physician ami early in 
life located at Abington, where he built up an extensive practice 
and continued to reside until his death, in 1850. He was one of the 
honored citizens and well known pioneers of the county and was 
a man who made his life count for good in all it ^ relations. Me 
was a man of strong mentality and unwavering integrity and con- 
tributed In- quota to the development and civic upbuilding of this 
now opulent section of the lloosier Stale. Ill-- widow died in 1S71 
and they were survived by two children. James Edward Swallow, 
the elder son, also became a physician and .-.pent his entire life at 
Abington, where he was engaged in the practice of his profession. 
He died Feb. 11. i<Xg<j. Joshua X. Swallow is indebted to the 
schools of Abington for his early educational discipline, also attend- 
ing a couple of terms at Centerville, and this training has since 
been effectively supplemented through association with men and 
affairs during a signally active and useful career. His father died 
when he was young and he continued the assistant of his mother 
until he had attained to the age of twenty-nine years, although 
he worked for others to some extent. He then sold his interest in 
the homestead and purchased a farm in the western part of Abing- 
ton township, to the improvement and cultivation of which be con- 
tinued to devote his attention for the ensuing fifteen \ ears. He 
then sold the property and purchased sixty-five acres east of Ab- 
ington, where he has since maintained his residence. He finds 
satisfaction in having a home in the count}' which is endeared to 
him by the memories and associations of the past, ami here bis 
circle of friends is circumscribed only by that of his acquaintance- 
ship. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party 
and he takes a loyal interest in public affairs of a local nature, hav- 
ing served as township assessor three terms, and at the present 
time is incumbent of the position of road supervisor. On Oct. 26, 
1871, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Swallow to Miss liar- 



57^ MKMolUS pi? WAYNI-: COUNTY 

bara Rodenberg, born in Abington township, May 2, 1844, a daugh- 
ter of George and Mary Catherine ( Plankinghorn ) Rodenberg. 
Mr. and Mrs. Swallow have two children: Ethel Estella, horn 
Nov. 22, 1873, is the wife of Emmet Dye, a blacksmith at Abing- 
ton, and has two children— Trilba II. and iiernicc; and Roscoe 
George Edward, born Nov. 5, 1883, resides at the parental home, 
associated with his father in the work and management of the 
home farm. Mr. Swallow is a member of Abington Lodge, \ T o. 
40,'), Knights of Pythias, and Abington Lodge, X'o. 154, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Kellpws, having passed through the chairs 
of each of the local organizations. George Rodenberg. father of 
Mrs. Swallow, came to this county from his native Stale of Penn- 
sylvania and became one of the representative pioneer farmers of 
Abington township, where he passed the remainder of his life, his 
.wife dying May 22. 1011. at the advanced age of eighty-six years. 
She was a native of Germany and came with her parents V > America 
when three years old. Her father was a farmer 111 Pennsylvania 
and later settled in Abington township, where he spent the resi- 
due of his life. To George and Mary Catherine ( Plankinghorn) 
Rodenberg were born twelve children, of whom Mrs. Swallow is 
the eldest; Anna Maria married Monroe Stinson, of Abington 
township; Sarah Malinda is the widow of George Stinson, of Union 
count}' ; Bennett II. married Mary Wright and resides in Kansas; 
Martin L. married Louisa Myers and resides in Center township; 
Man- and John A. reside at the old homestead; William II. married 
Mrs. Belle Rodenberg and they reside in Centerville ; Cora Alice 
married Rufus Lambert, of Union county; Laura L. resides at the 
old homestead; Ella married Charles Brown and resides in Union 
county; and Willard R. married Sadie Schodel and resides in Union 
county. 

Milton Jacob Bowermaster was engaged in farming m Wayne 
county during all of his adult life and his memory is held in affec- 
tionate regard in the community in which he resided. It is cer- 
tainly most consonant that in this publication be perpetuated a 
brief review of this honored and loved citizen, who died at his 
home near East Germantown, Jan. 11, [906. Mr. Bowermaster was 
born in Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, Jan. 2), 1848, a sou of 
Jacob and Sarah (Armstrong) Bowermaster. natives oi the same 
county. They came west to Wayne county, in 1861, and lived 111 
Jacksonburg one year, after which the father purchased a farm one 
mile north of Jacksonburg, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. The mother survived him and died in Jacksonburg, Milton 
J. Bowermaster was reared in a home of culture and refinement and 
after due preliminary study in the schools of Jacksonburg assisted 
his father on the farm until he reached the age of twenty-two years. 
lie then rented a farm in Jackson township and entered upon the 
active pursuit of his chosen vocation, residing on this farm two 
years, lie then removed to Harrison township, where he lived 
several years, and in 1903 came to the present home of the widow, 
consisting of 144 acres, where he erected a house and maintained 
his home and business activities until death. Me gained recotrni- 




MILTON JACOB BOWERM ASTER. 




MRS. EMMA R. BOWERMASTER 



tion as one of the representative farmers of Wayne county and 
ever continued a close and appreciative student of his occupation. 
He was a Republican in politics, was a member of the Masonic- 
order, and was an attendant of the Lutheran church, in which faith 
he was reared. Mr. Bowermaster was a man of broad sympathy 
and gentle toleration. Thai he gained and retained the affectionate 
regard of those with whom he was associated, need not be slated. 
and in his death there was left in the community a dee]) sense of 
personal loss and bereavement, for his friends and admit ers were 
in ail classes and stages of life. He made his own life count for 
good in its every relation, and the world gained through his serv- 
ices ind his noble manhood. On Dec. 21, 1870, was solemnized the 
marriage of Mr. I'.owermaster to Miss Emma Uoughner, a daugh- 
ter of Charles and Mary (Waltz) Boughner, both horn in Schuylkill 
county. Pennsylvania. When thirteen years obi Charles Boughner 
came West with his widowed mother and located in Germantown, 
Ind., where he followed carpentering a time and then engaged in 
farming, retiring some time before his death. The parents of Mary 
(Waltz) Boughner came to Wayne county when she was eighteen 
months old and located on the farm where Mrs. Piowermaster re- 
sides. The original log house is still standing, in a good state of 
preservation, although about 100 years old. Mr. and Mrs. I'.ower- 
master became the parents of two children: Lena, the wife of 
Claude Kitterman, a banker in Cambridge City (see sketch), and 
Alvin, deceased. Alvin married Levina Caldwell, daughter of Amos 
and Catherine (Morris) Caldwell, and they had a son, Carl C. The 
widow and son make their home with Mrs. Bowermaster. Mrs. 
Bowermaster still maintains her home at the farmstead, where she- 
is surrounded by many devoted and cherished friends. She holds 
membership in the Lutheran church. 

Marcus D. L. Reyonlds, a leading farmer and one of the prom- 
inent and influential citizens of Center township, was bom in Har- 
rison township, Wayne county, Indiana, March 26, 1857. His par- 
ents — Abraham and Melissa (Jones) Reynolds — were natives re- 
spectively of the State of New Jersey and Wayne count)-, Indiana, 
the father born Aug. 24, 1824, and the mother near Centerville, 
June 28, 1835. Abraham Reynolds came to Wayne county with his 
parents when twelve years old and the family located a short dis- 
tance west of Centerville, where the son grew to manhood. Earlv 
in life he engaged in teaming, from Centerville to Cincinnati, and 
followed that occupation until about thirty years old, when he en- 
gaged in the threshing business and farming, lie purchased a farm 
in the southeast corner of Harrison township and there resided 
about twenty-five years, at the end of which period he sold that 
place and purchased a farm near Centterville, where he continued 
to reside until his death, which occurred Feb. 13. 1004. his wife 
having passed away Nov. 24, 1891. Thev were the parents of two 
children, of whom Marcus D. L. is the eldest, ami Wallace C. is a 
farmer and resides in Wayne township, having formerly been a 
school teacher in this count}' twenty-three years. Marcus I ). L. 
Reynolds was educated in the schools of I larrison and Center town- 



578 M KM ol US OK \\ AN \i: i iil'MV 

ships and completed his scholastic training in the normal school al 
Lebanon, Ohio. lie resided at home until twenty-one years old, 
though he began teaching school at the age of eighteen, helping his 
father during the summer months. In 1878 he rented land from 
his grandfather, and this he occupied two years, after which for 
two years he rented land of his father. Then, in partnership with 
his father, he purchased the farm where he now resides and which 
consists of eighty acres, and in 1891 purchased his father's interest 
in the farm. In politics he is not definitely affiliated with any po- 
litical party, but his sympathies are with the Prohibition move- 
ment. To an unusual degree Mr. Reynolds has the respect- and 
good wishes of all of his associates and his example and life have 
good influence on those who are fortunate to he numbered among 
his friends. Fraternally he is a member of lloosier Lodge, \'o. 23, 



Indcpeni 


lent Order of Odd Fellows, at Centerville, has passed 


through 


the chairs of the local organization and is a member of 


the ( Iran 


d Lodge of Indiana. His son also enjoys the same dis- 


Unction 


and is a member and officer of the Knights of Pythias 


lodge at 


Richmond. On Jan. 30. 1879, was celebrated Mr. Rey- 


nobis' m 


arriage to Miss Anna Harm el, born in Warren county, 


Ohio, X. 


iv. i_\ 1856, daughter of Jarvis and Katharine (Sears) llar- 


mel. Mr 


s. Reynolds died in 1891, having become the mother of two 


children, 


the eldest of whom died in infancy, and the other, Ralph 



T., bom July 20, 1884, was a bookkeeper and solicitor with the 
llackman & Klefoth Coal Company for five years and now con- 
ducts a news agency at Anderson, Ind. On Feb. 14, 181)4, Mr 
Reynolds was married to Miss Nena E. Bean, born in Green town- 
ship, June 13, 1858. daughter of John and Elizabeth (Evans) Mean. 
The father of Mrs. Reynolds was bom near I larrisburg. Pa., Jan. 
17, 1816, and the mother in Green township, this county, \ T ov. 3, 
1824. The father removed to Warren county, Ohio, when seven 
years old, with his parents, ami there they spent the residue of their 
"lives. In about 1847 he came to Wayne county and made it his 
permanent home, dying here, Nov. 28, 1901. His widow died March 
12, 191 1. 

William Culbertson has resided upon his present homestead 
farm, in Center township, nearly a third of a century, and is one 
of the venerable pioneers and honored citizens of this section of the 
county, where he has lived and labored to goodly ends, contributing 
his quota to the material and civic development of the county, and 
where he holds the unqualified esteem of all who know him. Though 
living virtually retired he maintains a general supervision of the 
farm and has by no means lost his vital interest in the affairs of 
the day. lie has well earned the dignified repose which he is en- 
joying and finds the evening of his life gracious in its memories and 
its present associations. Mr. Culbertson was born in the town- 
ship of Center, Wayne county, Indiana, Oct. 2j, 1831, a son of 
Robert and Rebecca (King) Culbertson, the former a native of 
Delaware and the latter of Kentucky, and they were representa- 
tives of families founded in America in the Colonial era of our 
country's history. The father came to Wayne count)' in early life 



BIOGRAPHICAL 579 

and settled in Center township, where he and his wife continued 
to reside until their deaths. He became an extensive land owner 
and was a man of probity and honor, commanding the esteem of 
his fellow men. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, 
of whom William is the next to the youngest and the only one liv- 
ing. William Culbertson was reared on the old home farm and re- 
ceived his early educational training in a log cabin located on what 
is now the Henry Stiggleman farm, lie continued to be identified 
with the work of his father's farm until thirty years old, and in 
1861 purchased a farm in Webster township, one mile north of liis 



1" 


esent loeatioi 


11. 


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re.-m 


lei 


1 there 


al 


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. l\v 


cut 


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•s. 




in 1 


88 r 


S( 


.Id 111 


.at place 


ar 


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inch 


as< 


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rm 


win 


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cured . 


eighty a 


ere 


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in 


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in the I 


las 
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ft a 


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spent) 


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nest 


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ead 


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of 1 


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life 


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lab. 


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See ha 


s given 



his aid and influence in behalf of all worthy measures and enter- 
prises advanced for the general good of the community. On Dec. 
27, 1853, two months after attaining the age of twenty-two years, 
Air. Culbertson took an important step in his life and one that has 
proven of unalloyed satisfaction during all the long intervening 
years. On that day he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane 
Ebersol, born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, April 25, 1836, 
daughter of Solomon and .Ann ( Longnecker) Ebersol (see sketch of 
Solomon Ebersol). Mr. and Mrs. Culbertson became the parents 
of ten children : Lafayette, born in 1854, resides in Richmond ; 
Alice, born Oct. 22, 1858, is the wife of Ollie Sharon, a retired 
farmer in Wichita, Kan.; George W. is a rural mail carrier and 
resides in Richmond; Kate is the wife of Henry Harney, a farmer 
of Center township; Ella is the wife of Abraham Potter, a farmer 
near Williamsburg; Letitia is the wife of William K. Cheesman 
(see sketch) ; William, Jr., is a farmer and resides near Center- 
ville ; and the last three born died in childhood. 

Cyrus O. Albertson is one of the well known citizens and pro- 
gressive farmers of Center township, where he is the owner of a 
fine farm, and for several years has been living in retirement. He 
has passed his entire life in this county, has wielded no little in- 
fluence in public affairs of a local nature, and has so ordered his 
course as to retain at all times the inviolable confidence and regard 
of his fellow men. Air. Albertson was born in the city of Rich- 
mond, Wayne county, Indiana, March 27, 1833, a son of Joshua 
and Abigail (Ratliff ) Albertson, natives of Randolph county, 
North Carolina, which county furnished many pioneers to Wayne 
county. Joshua Albertson, born in the year 1790, was a man who 



580 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

was animated by unequivocal patriotism. In early life he was a 
carpenter contractor and builder and came to Richmond about 1820. 
There he engaged in the carpenter trade and continued his resi- 
dence in that city until about 1839, when he purchased a farm in 
Clay township, where he died in 1877. His wife preceded him by 
many years and was summoned to the life eternal in 1850. Of the 
twelve children only four are living: William resides in Sedge- 
wick City, Kan.; Cyrus O. is the next in order of birth; Elizabeth 
is the widow of Amos Ileston and resides in Greensboro, Henry 
county; and Rebecca Jane is the wife of Seth Stafford, of near 
Greensboro. Cyrus O. Albertson secured his early educational 
discipline in the district schools of Center township. In his youth 
lie assisted his father on the farm, and after remaining at the old 
homestead until twenty-four years old rented land about three 
years. He then purchased his present homestead farm of eighty 
acres in Center township and upon the same has since continued 
to reside, with the exception of two years when he resided on his 
father-in-law's farm. He has given to the farm his general super- 
vision and has been known as one of the progressive agriculturists 
of the count)-. His farm is one of the model places of the town- 
ship and is improved with specially good buildings, including the 
attractive modern residence, which was erected by him. He has a 
residence property in Centerville and also owns the old James 
Albertson residence in Richmond. Though showing a loyal interest 
in public affairs and doing all in his power to insure good govern- 
ment in his township and county, Mr. Albertson has never sought 
office for himself, and in matters of political import is a Republican. 
He and his wife are both zealous supporters of the United 
Brethren church. On Dec. 12, 1855, Mr. Albertson was united in 
marriage to Miss Martha A. Brooks, born near Economy, in Perry 
township, June 5, 1836, daughter of John and Rachel (Lock; 
Brooks, honored and well known residents and pioneers of Perry 
township. Of this union were born four children: Emma R. is 
the wife of James R. Helms (see sketch) ; Olive J., born March 14, 
1861, is the wife of Ezra A. Clemmohs, of Fountain City ; India A., 
born Dec. 13, 1863, became the wife of Warren Irvin and died July 
26, 1901 : and Ora B., bom Aug. 3, 1872, is the wife of Cortez 11. 
Jones, of Centerville. Mrs. Albertson's father was born in Guil- 
ford county, North Carolina, Nov. 18, 1806. He came to Wayne 
county when a young man, and after his marriage to Rachel Lock, 
Sept. 5, 1833, settled on land in Clay township, where he developed 
a good farm and was one of the honored and influential citizens of 
that part of the county. Of that union were born two daughters: 
Betsy Jane (Brooks) Bailey, born Nov. 12, 1834, and Martha Ann, 
the wdfe of Mr. Albertson. Rachel (Lock) Brooks departed this 
life Aug. 24, 1843, ana< on Dec. 21, 1844, John Brooks was married 
to Mary Ann Johnson, in Morgan county, Indiana. Of this second 
union were born three children: Jesse W., born Nov. 9, 1845; 
Emma Alice (Brooks) Bellis, born Tan. 19, 1856; and Flora Bell 
(Brooks) Worl, born March 11, 1863.' John Brooks died on the old 
homestead, Jan. 19, 1896. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Al- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 58 1 

bertson were William and Damaris (Mills) Lock, natives of North 
Carolina, the former horn in Granville county, June 13, 1787, and 
died Nov. 3, 1868, and the latter in Stokes county, April 7, 1784, 
and died Nov. 27, 1858. Their daughter, Rachel (Lock) Brooks, 
was horn in Perry township, Wayne county, Indiana, May 26, 
1816. The maternal great-grandparents of Mrs. Alhertson were 
Aaron and Charity Mills, the former horn Feb. 22, 1749, and the 
latter Jan. 19, 1754, and departed this life in 183C. The paternal 
great-grandfather of Mrs. Alhertson was David lirooks, the cele- 
brated Quaker preacher, born in April. 1737, and his wife was 
Sarah (Sanders) Brooks, born in June, 173'). Their son, Jesse 
Brooks, was born in Stokes county, North Carolina, Oct. 20, 1775. 
and he married Judith Johnson, a native of North Carolina, horn 
May 25, 1779. Of their union was born John Brooks, father of 
Mrs. Alhertson. 

Carlos E. Tubesing is one of the progressive farmers and high- 
ly honored citizens of his native township of Center, where he 
occupies a well improved farm of 100 acres, and he is a representa- 
tive in the third generation of one of the sterling pioneer families 
of this county, with whose annals the name has been identified 
from the pioneer era in the history of this section. Mr. Tubesing 
was born on the farm and in the house where he resides, in Center 
township, July 11, 1884, a son of Henry and Amelia (Frauman) 
Tubesing, the former born in Webster township, this county, Nov. 
21, 1857, and the latter at Richmond, Tnd., Sept. 24, 1861. Henry 
Tubesing was reared amidst the scenes and influences of that ear- 
lier era and his early educational advantages were such as were 
afforded in the district schools of the locality and period. In his 
youth he assisted his father on the farm and resided at the parental 
home until he arrived at the age of maturity. About 1878 he rented 
the farm where his son, Carlos E., resides, and after some years' resi- 
dence there purchased thirty acres adjoining, in Webster town- 
ship. The farm which his son occupies was later deeded to him 
and he also purchased the place known as the "'Thompson Farm," 
upon which he resided about five years. Then turning that place 
over to his son, Edgar, he returned to the place where Carlos E 
resides, and after a residence there of four years removed to Rich- 
mond, where he and his wife live retired, at 324 North Fifth street. 
He is a man of a high order of mentality, and, living a "goodly, 
righteous and sober life," has held as his own the inviolable con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellow men. To him and his good wife 
were born three children: Edgar, Avho is a farmer and resides in 
Center township, married Rose Placke and they have one child, 
Yerlin; Carlos E. is the second in order of birth ; and Hilda resides 
with her parents in Richmond. Carlos E. Tubesing gained his pre- 
liminary educational discipline at sessions of school in the Starr 
school-house, the Sevastapool school-house, and later at Culbert- 
son's school-house. He was reared to the beneficent and invigorat- 
ing life of the farm, is familiar with all details of the work-, has 
gained a definite knowledge of the various scientific principles irr- 
volved, and has never found it necessary or desirable to seek other 



582 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

vocations. He has thus been identified with agricultural pursuits 
in his native county from his boyhood to the present time, and dur- 
ing all of that time has been associated in the work and manage- 
ment of the old homestead, where he continues his successful oper- 
ations as a general farmer. In politics he gives an unqualified alle- 
giance to the Republican party, but has never held public office, lie 
is one of the most zealous and valued members of Trinity English 
Lutheran Church at Richmond. On Nov. 29, 1906, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Clara Tieman, a native of Richmond, who presides 
over the domestic economies and social affairs of their hospitable 
home. Of this union have been born two children, the first one, 
born July 4, 1909, having died in infancy, and Earl Henry, born 
Aug. 20, 1910. Mrs. Tubesiug's parents — Harmon and Louisa (Sut- 
off) Tieman — were born in Germany, the father on Oct. 5, 185S, 
and the mother on March 13 of the same year. Coming to America, 
they located in Richmond, where they resided until about 1892, 
when the father purchased a farm in Boston township, to which 
he has added until he now has 180 acres, which he is engaged in 
cultivating. 

DeWitt C. Russell, who died June 28, 191 1, was one of the sub- 
stantial farmers and honored citizens of Center township, a resi- 
dent of Wayne county from his birth, and when it is stated that 
the period thus represented was nearly sixty-four years it will be 
readily understood that he witnessed the development of this sec- 
tion from the conditions of the early epoch to a day of opulent pros- 
perity and advanced civic status. DeWitt Clinton Russell was 
born on what is known as the "Kempton Farm," in Center town- 
ship. Sept. 29, 1847, a son of Vinnedge and Jane (Rich) Russell, 
the former born in Trumbull county, Ohio, Dec. 10, 181 1, and the 
latter in Guilford county, North Carolina, Oct. 21, 1817. The pa- 
ternal grandparents came to Indiana when Vinnedge was nine 
months old and located on the farm where DeWitt C. Russell was 
born. There Vinnedge Russell grew to manhood, became an early 
land owner in Wayne county and followed fanning until his death, 
Dec. 19, 1887, his wife having passed away Aug. 15, 1851. He was 
a man of strong and vigorous mentality, his life was one of exalted 
righteousness, and his name merits a place on the roll of the hon- 
ored pioneers of the county, to whose civic and material develop- 
ment and progress he contributed his quota. In an old copy of the 
"Indiana Farmer," dated Dec. 1, 185 1, is found the following con- 
tribution from his pen, which shows him to have been among the 
foremost of those interested in agricultural pursuits: "Messrs. 
Editors: — In conversation with a brother farmer a few days since, 
the subject of the above named paper [Indiana Farmer] came up; 
he remarked that he had not seen it, but he supposed that it must 
be a great paper, as the editors were great farmers — that in his 
opinion they knew about as much about farming as a jackass. 
Now, Messrs. Editors, the light I viewed the matter in is this : I pro- 
fess to know something about farming. When corn planting arrives, 
I go to my crib and select from the mass my seed, if not previously 
done. So with the publisher of a paper; he selects from the mass 



BIOGRAPHICAL 583 

such articles as possess the greatest merit. It would he a great 
paper that 1 could publish, or even my brother fanner who thinks 
your qualifications so high and exalted, although we profess to 
know something about farming. The object I have in view is this; 
to stir up my brother farmers to pen their experiments and re- 
sults — to throw their mites in, that the editors may have a store- 
house to select from. Now I will give an experiment that I tried 
in the fall of 1849. When 1 dug my potatoes, I found the rot to a 
considerable extent. 1 assorted them and left them on the ground 
to dry, after which 1 piled them up and covered them to keep them 
dry, and let them remain some three weeks, ami then put them 
away in the following manner: I first leveled off the ground and 
sprinkled it over with slacked lime, and then put potatoes, sprinkled 
them with lime occasionally, after which T covered with straw and 
then earth to about eight inches' thickness, covering the whole with 
flax straw sufficient to keep the earth dry. The result was, that 
when I come to open in the spring I found them perfectly dry and 
sound. As far as my experience goes, I think potatoes keep their 
flavor better in the ground than in a cellar. Come, brother farmers, 
let us hear from you. Perhaps you may hear from me again." 
To Mr. and Mrs. Vinnedge Russell were born seven children: 
John, bom April 8, 1839, is deceased; Francena, born Nov. 2, 1841, 
became the wife of Abijah Jenkins and is deceased ; Joseph P., born 
June 12, 1844, is a mechanic and resides in Richmond; Ithamer, 
born Dec. 31, 1845, fUe d March 30, 1853; DeWitt C. was the next 
in order of birth; Allen \Y., born March 9, 1849, died in 1894; and 
Martha is the wife of Michael Helms (see sketch). After the death 
of his first wife, Vinnedge Russell, on Feb. 22, 1852, was married 
to Elizabeth Jay, born in Miami county, Oct. 6, 1813, but no chil- 
dren were born of this union. DeWitt C. Russell secured his rudi- 
mentary education in the schools of District No. 1 in Center town- 
ship, which he attended during the winter terms, when his services 
were not in requisition in connection with the work of the home 
farm. He resided with his father until the death of that parent, 
although he took charge of the farm at the age of twenty-five years, 
and continued to reside there until 1888, when he purchased a fine 
homestead of seventy acres, in Center township. He resided there 
about five years and then went back to the old homestead, where he 
remained until it was sold by the heirs, about four years later, lie 
-then returned to his own place, where he afterward maintained his 
home and where the labors of years are definitely shown in the 
general air of thrift and prosperity which pervades the place and 
marks it as one of the model farmsteads of the county. He showed 
in his career a signal devotion to the duty represented in the affairs 
of everyday life, and was one of the world's noble army of workers. 
Than this commendation no man needs more. His life was guided 
by strict principles of personal integrity and honor, and the objec- 
tive sequel was the reposing in him of unqualified confidence and 
esteem on the part of his fellow men. His advancement was coin- 
cident with the progress and development of the county, and an 
the latter days, when the shadows of his life began to lengthen 



584 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

from the Golden West, "with the glory of God in the after-glow," 
he could revert to what had been lost and what had been won, and 
find that little had been left undone that was possible of accom- 
plishment on his part. In matters of public import Mr. Russell 
always showed a deep interest and did his part in sustaining all 
worthy enterprises and measures advanced in behalf of the general 
good of the community, though he never sought nor desired public 
office. 1 1 is political allegiance was given to the Jacksonian Demo- 
cratic party, and the only local office in which he ever consented 
to serve was that of supervisor. He was a devout and zealous sup- 
porter of the Third Methodist Episcopal Church at Fairview, as 
is also his widow, and he was affiliated with the Odd Fellow frater- 
nity, in the local organization of which he served two terms as 
Noble Grand. On April 10, 1873, Mr. Russell was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Margaret A. Hammond, born in Jay county, Indi- 
ana, Oct. 11, 1851, daughter of Pleasant Hammond, a well known 
pioneer of that county. They became the parents of two children, 
both of whom are deceased. Mrs. Russell was summoned to the 
life eternal, Dec. 29, 1877, and on March 10, 18S0, Mr. Russell was 
united in wedlock to Mrs. Luella N. (Medearis) Davis, daughter of 
John Fletcher and Caroline (Abrahams) Medearis (see sketch of 
Daniel B. Medearis). The children of the second marriage are: 
Luella, born Dec. 7, 1880, wife of Charles Wilson, a farmer of 
Wayne township; Fannie E., born March 7, 1882, wife of John 
Wickersham, a farmer residing on the old John Fletcher Medearis 
farm at Olive Hill; Jennie, born Aug. 25, 1887, residing at the 
parental home; and John Clinton and Clara Martha (twins), born 
May 25, 1891. John Clinton was married, March 1, 191 1, to Leota 
Colvin, and resides at the parental home, and Clara Martha was 
married, May 31, 191 1, to Ralph McMinn, and they reside in Cen- 
terville. Mrs. Russell, by her first marriage, has one child, George 
D. Davis, born Nov. 3, 1877, also a member of the Russell house- 
hold. The family has in their possession a copy of the "Western 
Citizen," published at Paris, Ky., in 1808, and which presumably 
was brought to Wayne county by some of Mr. Russell's ancestors. 
They also have the copy of the "Indiana Farmer," containing the 
article quoted from the pen of Mr. Russell's father. 

Wallace C. Reynolds is one of the progressive farmers of the 
present active generation in Center and Wayne townships, where 
he is the owner of a well improved and productive farm of 127.5 
acres, forty acres of which is in Center township and the remainder 
in Wayne, and his dwelling house is located exactly on the line 
dividing these two subdivisions of Wayne county. His energy 
and good management are clearly indicated in the general thrift 
and prosperity which are distinctively in evidence in all parts of his 
landed estate, and he is known as a reliable, public-spirited and 
loyal citizen of his native county. Like many others of the valued 
citizens of Wayne county, Mr. Reynolds claims Harrison town- 
ship as the place of his nativity. He was born in that township, 
April 1, 1861, a son of Abraham and Melissa (Jones) Reynolds 
(see sketch of- Marcus D. L. Reynolds). Wallace C. Reynolds was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 585 

reared to maturity on the paternal homestead in Wayne county, 
where he was afforded the advantages of the public schools, and 
he graduated in the Central Normal College at Danville, Ind., with 
the class of 1881. He continued to be associated in the work of the 
home farm until nineteen years old, when he began teaching school 
in Center township, and after his graduation continued to spend 
his summers on the farm and taught during the winters a period 
of twenty-three years, during one year of which time he taught in 
Meade county, Kansas. In 1891 he was enabled to make judicious 
investment of his accumulated earnings, since, in that year, he pur- 
chased his well improved farm of 127.5 acres, continuing teaching, 
however, for several years thereafter. As an independent fanner 
he has manifested the same energy and enterprise which had made 
his efforts as a teacher prolific in benefit to himself and his pupils, 
and the result is clearly shown in the appearance and appurtenances 
of his farm, which is devoted to diversified agriculture and stock 
growing. He is also a stockholder in the First National Bank at 
Richmond. Though he has never sought nor desired public office 
he is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party and is 
loyal to all the duties and responsibilities of citizenship. Dec. 25, 
1886, bore record of the marriage of Mr. Reynolds to Miss Rosa E. 
Townsend, born in Center township, this county, Aug. 25, i860, 
daughter of John M. and Elizabeth (Edgerton) Townsend. Mrs. 
Reynolds died Oct. 28, 1910, the mother of two children: Cora, 
born Nov. 23, 1887, in Kansas, graduated at Earlham College with 
the class of 1910, and Maud, born Sept. 17, 1889, graduated at 
Earlham College in the same class with her sister, won the Bryn 
Mawr scholarship, and is now a student in that institution of learn- 
ing. The parents of Mrs. Reynolds were early residents of Wayne 
county and are both deceased. 

Louis Smith merits recognition in this compilation by reason 
of his standing as one of the successful representatives of the agri- 
cultural industry in this county, as well as for the reason that he is 
a citizen of sterling worth and one who enjoys uniform popularity 
in the community which has been his home during many years of 
his life. Mr. Smith is a native of the adjoining Indiana county of 
Fayette, born near Connersville, March 12, 1836, a son of William 
and Sarah (Jennings) Smith, natives of Pennsylvania. Roth fami- 
lies were early founded in the Keystone State, which was the gen- 
erous and beneficent cradle of much of our national history. Wil- 
liam Smith immigrated to the West in an early da\ and located in 
Fayette count}-, Indiana, where he purchased a farm, and there he 
and his wife lived out the residue of their lives. They became the 
parents of ten children, of whom only two are living — Louis, who 
is the second in order of birth, and Sanford, who is a barber and 
resides in Indianapolis. William Smith was a man of sterling char- 
acter and upon the record of his long career as one of the world's 
noble army of workers there rests no blemish. His life was one of 
consecutive industry and he gained success through his own well 
directed efforts. He was well known throughout Fayette county 
and also in Wayne county. Louis Smith secured his early edu- 



586 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

cational training at the old ''Blinker Hill" school, long since dis- 
continued, in Fayette county, and from his boyhood days contribu- 
ted his quota to the work of the home farm, increasing his services 
as his ability and physical powers justified. Upon leaving the 
parental home he worked for others, beginning as a farm hand at 
the age of fourteen years, and continued as such until about thirty 
years old. He then purchased a farm in Jay county, Indiana, and 
resided there eighteen years, at the end of which period he dis- 
posed of that place and purchased a farm in Boston township, 
Wayne county, where he resided eight years, lie then sold that 
place and moved to Centerville, where he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres, twenty acres of which was within the corporation 
limits of that village. He resided there eight years, at the end of 
which time he disposed of that place and purchased forty acres of 
land where he now resides, in Wayne township, one mile from the 
city limits of Richmond. His farm is maintained under a high state 
of cultivation and equipped with excellent improvements, includ- 
ing a substantial residence and good barns. In politics he does not 
hold to strict partisan lines, but supports the measures and candi- 
dates approved by his judgment, and is one of the popular citizens 
of his township, where his circle of friends is limited only by that 
of his acquaintances. On Nov. 12, 1854, he wedded Miss Amanda 
Bennett, born in Hamilton, Ohio, May 4, 1840, a daughter of John 
Wilkinson and Margaret (Smith) Bennett. Of this union were 
born four children: Margaret, born in 1855, died in infancy; 
Mary Florence, born April 9, 1857, resides at the parental home; 
Albert, born April 2, i860, also resides with his parents; and Alice, 
born March 9, 1802, died at the age of two and one-half years. .Mrs. 
Smith's father was born in Connecticut and her mother in Pennsyl- 
vania. In early life the father was a sailor, but later engaged in 
well drilling, and he removed his family to Boston township, Wayne 
county, where he died during the cholera epidemic. 1 1 i ^ wife also 
died in this county. 

Nye Howard Snyder is to be recognized in this work as one of 
the representative farmers and stock growers of his adopted coun- 
ty, where he occupies and manages a well improved farm of 91.75 
acres, eligibly located in Wayne township, lie is a member of one 
(jf the sterling families of the county, which has represented his 
home since 1904, and has well upheld the honors of the name 
which he bears, fie was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, 
Dec. 2, 1884, a son of John AY. and Mary Ellen (La Haw) Snyder, 
born near Waynetown, west of Indianapolis, the father on July 28, 
1854, and the mother on Feb. 7, 185b. The)- resided in Montgomery 
county until 1904, when they removed to Wayne county and lo- 
cated on a farm in Franklin township, where they resided four 
years. They then removed to Earlham Heights, Richmond, where 
they erected a home and are now living retired, being accorded 
the unqualified esteem of- the community. They are the parents of 
six children : Effie is the wife of Fred Rideout, a carpenter of Indi- 
anapolis; Myrtle is the wife of Lee Moore, of Los Angeles,' Cal. ; 
Nye II. is the next in order of birth ; Weaver married Irene Jones, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 587 

of New Madison, Ohio, and resides at Earlham Heights; and Del- 
lah and George reside at the parental home. Nye II. Snyder 
gained his early educational discipline in the schools of Mont- 
gomery county and after attaining maturity came to Richmond 
and worked in the railway shops until he had attained the age 
of twenty-four years, when his father purchased the farm where 
the son now resides and which he has since operated in a general 
way. In politics Mr. Snyder is independent. On June 2j, 1907, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Effie Alexander, born at Union 
City, in Darke county, Ohio, Nov. 1, 1886, a daughter of George 
and May (Drill) Alexander, the former born in Darke county and 
the latter at Dayton, Ohio. The father was a farmer in earlv life, 
but is now in the butchering business, and the)- reside at Lynn, hid. 
They are the parents of five children — Pierre, Effie, Pearl, George, 
and Frances — all of whom reside at the parental home, excepting 
Mrs. Snyder. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder are the parents of two chil- 
dren — Mildred Helena, born April 30. 1909, and Harold LeRoy, 
born June 18, 191 r. 

William C. Rich is the owner of one of the valuable farms of 
Wayne township and finds cause for gratification in that his home- 
stead is thai upon which his entire life has been passed, since his 
honored father purchased the same in the '20s, since which time 
it has been transformed from a primitive pioneer farm to one that 
exemplifies the thrift and prosperity now marking this favored sec- 
tion of the State. Mr. Rich is a native of Wayne county, born on 
the farm where he resides, June 24, 1830, a son of Joseph and Mar- 
jorie (Cox) Rich, born in Randolph count)', North Carolina, the 
father in 1788 and the mother in 1790. About 1822 Joseph Rich 
came with his family to Wayne county and settled in Wayne town- 
ship, where he first purchased a small place and conducted a saw 
mill a few years, lie then sold that place and at a purchase price 
of $600 purchased 160 acres of the farm now owned by his only sur- 
viving child, William C. Rich. lie reclaimed much of the land 
from the forest and became one of the successful farmers of the 
county. He continued to reside on the old homestead until his 
death, Nov. 9, 1858, and his widow followed him to eternal rest. 
Jan. 17, 1863. Of the eight children, William C. is the last in 
order of birth and is the only one of the number living. The 
father was a man of integrity and honor and ever commanded the 
respect of the community in which he maintained his home so 
many years. William C. Rich was reared to maturity on the farm 
which is now his home. His early educational advantages were 
those afforded in an old brick schoolhouse in Wayne township, and 
he continued to be associated in the work and management of the 
home farm until he had attained to his legal majority. Ueing the 
youngest of the family, he then remained on the homestead ami 
took care of his father, who deeded him sixty acres oi land. Cpon 
the death of his mother, by the provision of his father's will, the 
entire landed estate was inherited by our subject, but to avoid ill 
feeling he gave the other heirs sufficient cash to satisfy them. I le 
added to the original sixty acres until he had 2j 3 acres, but has 



588 MEMOIRS OF WAYNK COUNTY 

since deeded two acres to the railroad company, thus leaving 271 
acres in the farm. He continued successfully in agricultural pur- 
suits and has made the best of improvements on the farm, includ- 
ing the erection of his present modern and attractive residence. 
During his active career he engaged extensively in the raising uf 
hogs. Though he is now living essentially retired, he gives a gen- 
eral supervision to his farm, which is under the active control and 
management of his two sons. The place is devoted to diversified 
agriculture and stock growing. In politics Air. Rich gives his alle- 
giance to the Republican party and is loyal and public-spirited as 
a citizen, taking much interest in local affairs. To him is accorded 
the esteem and good will of the community in which he was reared 
and in which it has been his to attain a position of independence 
and definite prosperity as one of the representative farmers of 
the county. In August, 1854, Mr. Rich was united in marriage to 
Miss Margaret Duke, born in Wayne township, this count} - , April 
30, 1837, daughter of John and Mariam (Aldred) Duke. Her 
father was born in North Carolina, Sept. 9, 1808, and her mother 
in Wayne township, this county, Nov. 22, 1816. Mr. Duke came to 
Indiana as a young man and first settled near Dover (now Web- 
ster). Later he purchased land in Wayne township, where he de- 
veloped a good farm, and here passed the residue of his life, secure 
in. the esteem of all who knew him. He died at a venerable age, in 
1898, and his wife survived him about two years. They were the 
parents of eight children, four of whom are living, and of these .Mrs. 
Rich is the eldest ; Serepsey is the wife of Dr. Meeks, of Hollands- 
burg; Dora is the wile of Alveron C. Brown, of West Richmond; 
and John resides in West Richmond. To Air. ami Mrs. Rich were 
born seven children: Frances M., born June 19, 1855, is a farmer 
and fruit grower in Wayne township; Willis D. (see sketch); 
Eveline, born July 12, i860, is the wife of Horace Ratlin , a farmer 
in Center township; Joseph, born Dec. 9, 1862, was killed at what 
is now the Rich Crossing, July 29, 1887, his mother-in-law, son and 
himself being killed at the same time by a train; Mariam, born 
Aug. 26, 1866, resides at the parental home; Oscar, born June 15, 
1868, is a farmer in Wayne township; and Anna, born Dec. 13, 
1872, is the wife of Jerome Shurley, who is engaged in the com- 
mission business — stock buying and selling — in East Richmond. 

James C. Horrell, living in the township of Wayne, is a mem- 
ber of a family which was founded in Wayne count}' about 1862. 
He is a native of Boone count}', and in Wayne count} has gained 
prestige as a land owner and successful fanner. No citizen is held 
in higher esteem in his community and none is more worthy ot this 
evidence of popularity and confidence. James C. Horrell was born 
in Boone county, Indiana, Aug. 14, 1854, a son of Thomas \V. and 
Susan I'.. (Mendenhall) Horrell, natives of Boone count}', the for- 
mer born in 1828 and the latter 011 April 20, 1832. The}' removed 
to Wayne count}' about 1862 and located on a farm near White- 
water, in Franklin township, where the}' continued to reside until 
April, 1875, When the father sold that place and moved to Rich 
mond, his death occurring in August of the same year, and the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 589 

mother passed away four years later. Their lives were marked by 
integrity, kindliness and usefulness. Of the three children, John 
Nelson was a railroad man when last heard from, in 1901 ; James 
C. is the second in order of birth; and William O. is engaged in 
the packing business at Dayton, Ohio. James C. Horrell is in- 
debted to the common schools of Franklin township and to White- 
water College for his early educational training, and he continued 
to be associated in the work of the home farm of his father until 
1875, when, before he was twenty-one years old, he began farming 
for himself on the place which he occupies, and which his father 
had purchased after selling his farm in Franklin township. Later, 
James C. engaged in contracting, road building, etc., for the city of 
Richmond, and also devoted some attention to real estate transac- 
tions, but has continued to devote his attention to the farm of fifty- 
four acres, upon which he resides in Wayne township, lie has 
made excellent improvements and has become known as one of the 
most energetic and progressive farmers of the township mentioned, 
and he devotes some attention to the buying and selling of horses. 
As a citizen Mr. Horrell has ever shown a lively interest in all 
that has tended to conserve the progress and prosperity of his home 
county and his political faith has been manifested in his stalwart 
support of the cause of the Republican part}-, lie is a zealous 
member of the South Eighth Street Friends' Church, of Richmond. 
In 1877 was solemnized the marriage of Air. Horrell to Miss Ida 
M. Snyder, born and reared in Wayne township, a daughter of 
Aaron and Agatha Snyder, prominent residents of Wayne town- 
ship, where the mother now resides, the father being deceased. 
Mrs. Horrell died in 1877, in the same year of her marriage, and 
on Dec. 23, 1880, Mr. Horrell married Miss Martha F. Bond, bom 
at Green's Fork, Aug. 4, 1853, daughter of William C. and Hannah 
(Lock) Bond, born in North Carolina, the father in 1809 and the 
mother in 1824. Mr. Bond came to Indiana with his parents when 
one year old, and they first settled near what is now Earlham. Two 
years later they removed to Green's Fork, where the father pur- 
chased a large tract of land, and there the parents resided the re- 
mainder of their lives. Mrs. Horrell's father continued to reside 
there after his father's death and became an extensive land owner. 
He died Nov. 7, 1901, and his wife passed away Aug. 4, 1888. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Horrell was born one child, Fannie Evelyn, born Oct. 
15, 1886, a graduate of the Indiana University in the class of 1910. 
The mother died Dec. 11, 1897. 

Franklin J. Brown, a prominent and influential farmer of the 
township of Wayne, is a native of the Iloosier State. He first be- 
held the light of day in the city of Richmond, Feb. 12, 1839, a son 
of Eli and Martha H. (Hawkins) Brown. The father, a native of 
North Carolina and a hatter by occupation, first came to Indiana 
in 1813, to look the country over. He stayed but a short time and 
then returned to North Carolina, again coming to Indiana in 1815, 
locating in Richmond, where he erected the second house built in 
the embryo city, its location being on what is now the court house 
square. He at once engaged in the hat manufacturing business, 



590 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

in which he continued several years, but subsequently erected a 
house on Main street, between Fourth and Fifth streets, and there 
resided and conducted a general store. Later, in partnership with 
a Mr. Brightwell, he engaged in the milling business where the 
Starr Piano factory is located, and the firm purchased practically all 
the grain and oil produced in this vicinity, freighting these products 
to Cincinnati. Mr. Brown continued in this business a number of 
years and then sold out to his partner and lived retired, later re- 
moving to his farm, where he and his wife resided until their deaths. 
The_\' were the parents of nine children: Anna. Flam 1., Alfred, 
Oliver, and James are deceased; William II. is living retired in 
Richmond; Amos is deceased; Frank J. is the next in order of 
birth; and Joseph E. is living retired in Richmond. The subject 
of this review acquired his education, first in a school on the old 
public square in what is now the First ward, and later in the first 
free school established in Richmond, lie also attended Professor 
rlollingsworth's college until the breaking out of the Civil war, 
and later took a course in bookkeeping, lie was associated with 
his father until the death of that parent, at the same time supei 
intending his own affairs, and in [863-64 served as deputy county 
clerk. In the spring of 1S64 he enlisted as a private in Company 
A of the One Hundred and Thirty-third Indiana infantry for sen 
ice in the Civil war. This regiment was organized in May, 1804, 
nine companies being raised in the Seventh Congressional district 
and one at Richmond in the Fifth district. It was mustered in, 
May 17, and left the State at once for Tennessee. It was mustered 
out in August, 1864. Mr. Brown then returned to his duties in tin' 
clerk's office and remained there until 1865, when he came to the 
farm where he resides, launching forth in agricultural pursuits. 
He has been very successful as a farmer, his place consisting of be- 
tween 230 and 240 acres, being cut by the Grand Rapids ec Indiana 
railroad, and he also owns valuable real estate, both in Richmond 
and in Howard county. In politics he is affiliated with the Re- 
publican party, and he is a member of Post 55, Grand Army of the 
Republic, at Richmond. 

William Richardson Crawford, an influential and well-to-do 
farmer and dairyman of the township of Wayne, is a native of 
Wayne county, Indiana, born on the farm where he resides, June 
9, 1865. His father, Daniel James Crawford, a native of Baltimore, 
Md., born in 1829, came with his parents to Wayne county in 1 S34 
and continued to reside upon the farm which his son occupies up 
to the time of his demise, in 1870. The mother of the subject of this 
record, Mary (Hoover) Crawford, was born in Wayne township, 
in 1833; there her marriage to Mr. Crawford occurred, and she- 
passed away in 1890. There were six children in the family: Alice 
is the wife of Levi M. Jones, a contractor of Wayne township; 
Charles W. is living retired in Richmond; Daniel Frederick died in 
1883; Frank D. is a carpenter and resides in Richmond; William R. 
is the next in order of birth ; and Fannie M. is deceased. William 
R. Crawford received his schooling in the Sevastapool school, in 
Wayne township, dividing his time between the farm and the school 



lilOGRAl'IUCAI. 5()I 

room. Upon leaving school he worked for others until married and 
then leased the farm. In 1S90 he purchased the homestead from 
his grandfather, the tract consisting of eighty acres of land. Since 
he took possession of the place he has removed much of the under- 
growth and timber, increased the productiveness of the soil, and 
enlarged and improved the buildings. Besides doing general farm- 
ing he operates a fine dairy and is interested in the breeding and 
raising of stuck of various varieties. Politically he is affiliated with 
the Republican party, but has not acquired the habit of seeking 
public office. On Dec. 24, 1884, he was united in holy matrimony 
to Miss Nettie M. Long, born at Abington, Ind., Jan. (>, 1804, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Mary (Long) Long, who for many years resided 
on a farm in Abington township. They were natives of German- 
town, Pa., the father born about 1825 and the mother in 1826. 
Their respective families came to Indiana, the father's when he was 
eleven years old and the mother's when she was six, having pre- 
viously resided in Germantown, Ohio. The father was a shoe- 
maker in early life, but later engaged in farming and became an 
extensive land owner in different parts of the county, lie later 
removed to Jennings county, but had resided there less than one- 
year when he was killed by a railroad train, about 1889, and the 
mother died June 30, 1910. The)- were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren: Mary, William, Sarah, and Emma died in infancy; Thomas 
\\a.> killed by being struck by an automobile, in Richmond, in 1908; 
Pierce resides in Cincinnati; Susan M. is the wife of (.'handler Wil- 
liams, a machinist, of Richmond; Ida M. is the wife of Edward W. 
Moore, of Richmond; Laura P. resides in Indianapolis; Mrs. Craw- 
ford is the next in order of birth; Nellie is the wife of Henry Ginn, 
a contractor, of Indianapolis; and Charles J. is a carpenter and re- 
sides at Indianapolis. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Crawford: Mary Myrtle, born April 14, 1887, is a professional 
nurse; Nellie Edith, born Aug. 2, 1888, is a stenographer and book- 
keeper in Indianapolis; William Frederick, born June 24, 1893; 
Daniel Joseph, born March 26, 1895; Ralph G., born Dec. 18, 1900; 
and Agnes Elizabeth, born Oct. 20, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford 
are members of the Third Methodist Episcopal Church of Rich- 
mond. 

Daniel Bosley Crawford. — A strong and noble character was 
that of him to whom this memoir is dedicated, and who exerted an 
emphatic influence in connection with industrial and civic affairs in 
the course of his long and significantly useful career as one of the 
honored citizens of Wayne county, where he took up his residence 
in the pioneer days. He came here as a young man and gained suc- 
cess through his individual application and ability, the while he 
ever stood exemplar of that integrity of purpose which figures as 
the plumb of character and makes for objective valuation in con- 
nection with the varied affairs of life. His strength was as the 
number of his days and he was summoned from the mortal life in 
the fullness of years and honors. His death occurred in Richmond, 
Jan. 14, 1898. Mr. Crawford was a native of Baltimore, Md., born 
Nov. i(>, 1807, and his family was founded in America in the Colo- 



5<J- MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

nial era of our country's history. He gained his early educational 
discipline in the schools of his native city and his active association 
with industrial pursuits had its inception in the pork packing busi- 
ness in the city of Baltimore. His early life was compassed by 
the gracious surroundings and influences of a good home and he 
was a birthright member of the Methodist Episcopal church, with 
which noble organization he continued to be identified until his 
death. He resided in his native city until about twenty-seven years 
of age, when he numbered himself among the pioneers of Wayne 
county, whither he came with a wife and three children, starting 
with a carriage and two wagons on the long journey of 700 miles, 
to cross the mountains on the way. This journey was performed 
without sickness or serious accident, landing at their destination, 
about two miles northwest of 'Richmond, April 2S, 1835. The new 
frame house being built for them was the only frame house between 
Richmond and Newport at that time. It not being completed, they 
abode for a couple of weeks with a neighbor, who kindly furnished 
them room in a part of his house. During the long years it re- 
quired to clear up his farm and make needed improvements the 
monotony was broken by religious services, which for nine years 
were held each Sabbath at his house, or in the barn if the house 
would not accommodate them, Mr. Crawford being the class leader. 
Still having a love for his former occupation, for several winter:', 
he assisted the pork' merchants of Richmond in cutting and packing 
their pork. Having been born, reared and educated in a city, it was 
but natural that lie should make mistakes and seem awkward to 
his neighbors and friends of the backwoods, but he always enjoyed 
the sport and amusement with them, even if it was at his own ex- 
pense, fie was successful as a farmer and took pride in raising and 
driving nice horses, at one time selling a matched team of duns for 
$400, which was considered a high price in those days. He made 
substantial improvements on his place, equipping it with excellent 
buildings and maintaining" it under effective cultivation; but after 
fifteen years of life as a farmer, and a prosperous one, he was com- 
pelled by reason of an affliction to give up that occupation. In 1850 
he moved to Richmond, engaged in the drygoods business, and for 
forty-six years was one of the leading merchants of the city. Dur 
ing all these years, and in dealing with every class of people, he was 
never known to sue a single person. He was for several years a 
director in the First National Bank of Richmond ; for many years a 
director in the Richmond City Mill Works, and also a director of 
the Wayne County Turnpike Company about ten years. He retired 
from the drygoods business in 1896, selling his interest in the busi- 
ness to his son, John Y. Crawford. During the memorable agitation 
of the temperance question, in 1848, a "Division of the Sons of 
Temperance" was instituted in Richmond ; and this organization 
was so prohibitive in its character that its members were not per- 
mitted to drink even sweet cider. On the roll of active members 
was the name of the subject of this sketch; and so conscientious 
and zealous was he that, while living on the farm, his crops of 
apples, such as he could not use or sell, were fed to the' stock 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



5<U 



rather than have them made into cider. His regalia as a Son of 
Temperance is still in the possession of the family in a good state 
of preservation and was handed down to one of his children as an 
heirloom, in commemoration of the testimony he bore against every- 
thing that would intoxicate. Mr. Crawford was a man of broad 
mental ken and was a citizen of utmost loyalty and public spirit. 
Previous to 1861 he had been a Democrat in politics, and it seemed 
a pleasant recollection to him that he had voted for Gen. Andrew 
Jackson for President. At the outbreak of the Civil war, however,' 
he identified himself with the Republican party and thereafter 
participated in its campaigns. He was three times in succession 
elected a commissioner of Wayne county and served from 1861 to 
1870. No more important business was ever transacted or greater 
responsibilities rested upon the commissioners of this county than 
during the period covered by that decade. The records of the Com- 
missioners' Court show that in the year 1863 a bounty of $400 was 
paid out of the county funds for each volunteer who would enlist 
as a soldier from this county. The requisite number of troops was 
raised and to meet this and other heavy expenses resulting from the 
war the commissioners issued county orders, bearing six per cent, 
interest, which were freely bought up by the citizens, thus liquidat- 
ing what would otherwise have been a large county debt. Suffice 
it to say that these orders were redeemed in full and the county was 
left measurably clear of debt at the expiration of Mr. Crawford's 
term of office. During the active operations of the war it was haz- 
ardous to send money, even by express, from the front back to the 
States. The families of the soldiers were sorely in need of money, 
and to secure it to them, the commissioners decided to send a man 
to visit the regiments in the field in which were volunteers from 
Wayne county, to receive and bring back the allotments or pay that 
the boys could spare and distribute the money among their fami- 
lies. Mr. Craw ford was selected as the most suitable man for that 
responsible and somewhat dangerous position. Me accomplished 
the task without accident or mishap and to the satisfaction of all 
parties. His honor and reputation insured him respect wherever 
known. He took a commendable interest in all that tends to con- 
serve the general welfare of the community and his influence was 
ever given in support of worthy causes and enterprises. At the 
time of the Morgan raid he enrolled his name as a private soldier 
in the One Hundred and Sixth Indiana infantry, and was unani- 
mously chosen as captain of Company I, July 10, 1863. This regi- 
ment was organized with nine companies of minute men and a 
company of the Legion. Five companies were from Wayne county, 
two from Randolph, and one each from Hancock, Howard and 
Marion counties. The regiment was organized July 12, 1863, and 
left Indianapolis on the night of the 13th, reaching Hamilton, Ohio, 
the next morning. It proceeded to Cincinnati and then returned to 
Indianapolis, where it was mustered out July 18, 1863. Por the 
length of time it was in the field the regiment did honorable serv- 
ice. Of him to whom this tribute is dedicated it may be said that' 
he knew well the springs of human motive, so that he was kindly 



5Q4 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

and tolerant in his judgment and ever ready to lend a helping hand 
to those "in any way afflicted in mind, body or estate." His upright 
life, careful judgment and generous attributes made his name a 
synonym for character and worth. 

Charles Henry Deitemeyer, a prosperous and highly esteemed 
farmer of the township of Wayne, Wayne county, is a native of 
the city of Richmond, born on South Tenth street, Feb. 6, 1862. 
His father, Adam Deitemeyer, a native of Hanover, Germany, was 
born in 1826, and his mother, Louisa (Lauman) Deitemeyer, was 
bom in the same country in 1839. They were married in Ger- 
many and then came to America, in October, 1859, locating in 
Richmond, where the father worked as an employe for others 
one year. He then rented a farm south of Richmond and resided 
there about five years, after which he purchased a farm north 
of Richmond, adjoining the present residence of his son, Charles 
H. He first purchased fifty acres, but added to this tract until 
he had a farm of 170 acres, and resided there until his death, 
April 23, 1897, his widow passing away Aug. 25, 1905. They 
were members of St. Paul's South Seventh Street Evangelical 
Lutheran church, of which Adam Deitemeyer was a charter mem- 
ber, and he assisted in the erection of the building. He was an 
ardent Democrat and took an active interest in public affairs. 
There were seven children: Henry, born in April, i860, was ac- 
cidentally killed at the age of five years; Charles H. is the second 
in order of birth; Mary, born Sept. 11, 1864, is the wife of James 
Schroeder, of Green township; Edward E. (see sketch); Emma, 
born in August, 1869, died in 1892; George, born April 9, 1872, is 
a farmer and resides in Kansas; and William, born May 23, 1875, 
is engaged in the drygoods business at Kokomo. Charles H. 
Deitemeyer acquired his educational training at a German school 
in Richmond and at the Starr schoolhouse in Wayne township, 
and he resided at home until twenty-one years old. He then con- 
tinued to work for his father until twenty-seven years old, re- 
ceiving $100 per year for his services, and at the end of that time 
rented a part of his father's farm, the same upon which he now 
resides. He afterwards purchased seventy acres of his present 
farm, which he proceeded to improve, and later added ninety-three 
acres, making 163 acres in all, which constitutes his farm to-day, 
its south line being two miles from the corporation limits of 
Richmond. He has carried on farming in a general way. In 
politics Mr. Deitemeyer is independent and has not been a seeker 
after public office. Himself and wife belong to the South Seventh 
Street Lutheran Church in the city of Richmond. On April 16, 
1890, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Emma Eoien, born 
in New Garden township, June 21, 1870, daughter of Harmon 
H. and Mary (Lammert) Eoien, the former born in Cincinnati, 
Eeb. 23, 1844, and the latter in Richmond, June 16, 1850. The 
father was a cigar-maker in early life and as a young man came 
to Richmond, where he worked at his trade a number of years. 
He then purchased the farm where he resides, in New Garden 
township, engaged in general farming. His wife died Aug. 2j, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 595 

1899. They were the parents of seven children: Henry W. is 
a farmer and resides in New Garden township ; George died in 
childhood; Mrs. Deitemeyer is the next in order of birth; Etta 
died in April, 1884, at the age of five years; William is a farmer 
and resides near Centerville ; Louis resides at the parental home, 
and Anna also resides with her father. 

William Harrison Pickett is a member of a family that has been 
favorably known throughout the eastern part of Wayne county 
since the pioneer days. He was born on the farm where he resides, 
in Wayne township, March 12, 1831, son of Benjamin and Deborah 
(Clark) Pickett, the former born in Chatham county, North Caro- 
lina, Sept. 22, 1797, and the latter in Lancaster count}', Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1798. In 1807 the paternal grandparents — Joshua and 
Sarah (Davis) Pickett — left their early friends and associations in 
North Carolina and journeyed to the wilds of Indiana, following a 
blazed path, and upon their arrival first camped on the bank of the 
Elkhorn river, south of Richmond, where Jeremiah Cox, a brother- 
in-law of the grandfather, then resided. They remained there until 
the following spring, when they located on a farm adjoining the 
one now occupied by William H. Pickett, and there they planted 
apple seeds, which the grandmother had brought in a satchel from 
their North Carolina home. The surrounding country was a wilder- 
ness and they resided at that place about fifteen or twenty years. 
The grandfather was a blacksmith by trade and the Indians fre- 
quently came to his shop and house, being upon the most friendly 
terms, because he was a follower of William Perm. The grand- 
father later sold the farm and removed to Milton, where his young- 
est daughter married Jonathan Kinley, a preacher in the Society 
of Eriends. The grandfather died at Milton, after which event the 
grandmother remained there a short time and then removed to the 
farm where William II. Pickett resides, and there resided with her 
son until her death, living to a ripe old age. When the maternal 
grandfather, Israel Clark, of English descent and a Friend, whose 
wife was Amy Walton, of American descent, sold out, in 1812, in 
Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, he intended to move to Indiana, 
but, owing to his wife's fears of Indian troubles in Indiana Terri- 
tory, he settled on a farm near Baltimore. In 1816, the war of 1812 
being ended ami border strife having quieted down, he moved to 
Wayne county and settled on what is known as the Joseph Ratliff 
farm, in Wayne township. After two years there he went to Cin- 
cinnati and entered a claim to the southwest quarter of section 17, 
range 1 west, or what is a part of William H. Pickett's farm. There 
he built a hewed log cabin, which stands well preserved to-day; on 
a hill overlooking the valley of the fork. He eventually acquired 
some 600 acres of land. His death occurred on land adjoining Wil- 
liam II. Pickett's farm, on the south, and his wife died in the log 
cabin ahead)' mentioned. A division of the Friends' church oc- 
curred about 1820, and Israel Clark and wife became allied with the 
Hicksite branch, as opposed to the Orthodox branch. Benjamin 
Pickett, father of William II., was a natural mechanic and planned 
and erected a corn and flour mill on the place before he had reached 



596 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

his majority. He also erected a carding and woolen mill on the 
farm and conducted it several years, but later sold it to a Canadian, 
who removed it to Laporte and located it on the Kankakee river. 
About 1839 or 1840, while building a log cabin on the hill, Benjamin 
Pickett was returning home one evening from his work, when he 
was attacked in the thick brush and woods by a large savage wolf. 
He was compelled to defend himself with a foot-adz, With which he 
had been footing rafters for his cabin, and in so doing backed away 
from the wolf, which leaped at his throat. While retreating he sud- 
denly fell and the adz cut a deep gash in his ankle. The smell of 
blood only added to the fury of the beast and it redoubled its efforts 
to kill the man. Mr. Pickett's cries for help were heard by his 
brother, Joshua, and a neighbor, John White. The family dogs also 
came to his assistance and with the help of the men drove the wolf 
off. Mr. Pickett was so weak from loss of blood that he was carried 
home and eventually recovered. But for the timely arrival of his 
rescuers soon he would have lost his life. Benjamin Pickett had no 
desire to be a farmer, although he went to Cincinnati and purchased 
the farm from the government. With the assistance of his sons, 
after the lapse of years, he had eliminated from the forest a good 
sized tract of land, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death 
occurring in 1875. The mother died in 1865. They had the follow- 
ing children: Eli M. is living retired in Chester, in his ninetieth 
year; Mary Ann is deceased; Milton L. is deceased; Hannah died 
at the age of three and one-half years ; William H. is the next in 
order of birth; John T., who served as a soldier in the Civil war 
with the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana infantry and 
became crippled while in the service, resides at Irvington, near In- 
dianapolis; Eber V. is a farmer and resides between Williamsburg 
and Green's Fork ; and Albert J. is engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness in Richmond. William H. Pickett worked on the farm with 
his father until twenty-four years old and then, because of ill health, 
gave up the farm, took lessons in penmanship, and for one year 
traveled over the country, giving lessons in that art. In June, 1856, 
he went to Iowa and taught writing school in Oskaloosa City until 
election time, when he returned to Wayne county to vote for John 
C. Fremont, and then, immediately after, went lo Highland and 
Clinton counties, Ohio, until the following spring. He then re- 
turned to Wayne township and, being persuaded by his mother and 
brothers, joined them in the erection of a saw mill in the village 
of Chester. He continued in that business three years, and in 
the fall of 1858 returned to Iowa and married, bringing his wife 
home with him and settling in the village of Chester. The mill 
was sold in 1861, and then Mr. Pickett removed to Richmond, 
where he purchased property on what is now North Tenth street; 
and resided there, following the carpenter trade, for more than 
twenty years. Two years before leaving Richmond, his father 
having died, he purchased the old family homestead, and since 
removing here has been engaged in farming pursuits, failing eye- 
sight rendering him unfit for mechanical work. He ereeted a 
fine dwelling house and other necessary farm buildings and has 



BIOGRAPHICAL 597 

confined his attention to general farming and dairying. On Oct. 
14, 1858, Mr. Pickett took to himself a wife and helpmate in the 
person of Miss Hannah Ellen West, born near Carmel, Hamilton 
county, Indiana, June 15, 1836, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
S. (Jessup) West, the former born in Clinton county, Ohio, and 
the latter in Wayne township, this county. The father was a 
farmer by occupation, but some years after his marriage en- 
gaged in the harness trade at Bethleham (now Carmel), and in 
1852 he and his brother went to Iowa, where they resided until 
the breaking out of the Civil war. A brother of Mrs. Pickett 
enlisted in the service at the age of seventeen and was accidentally 
killed, while entering a rifle-pit, by the discharge of a fellow sol- 
dier's musket. The father enlisted in what was known as the 
"Oskaloosa Greybeards" and served to the end of the war. He 
then returned to Oskaloosa and engaged in carpentering. Later, 
he traveled two years in the employ of the Fairbanks Scale peo- 
ple and then engaged in contracting at Oskaloosa. He after- 
wards removed to Lynnville, where he died, and his widow then 
removed to Independence, Kan., where she spent the residue of 
her life. They were the parents of five children: Martha Jane 
is the wife of a Mr. Lister, of Indianapolis; John Wesley is de- 
ceased; Elizabeth is the wife of Theodore Dunbar, of Perry, Iowa; 
Cyrus was killed in the Civil war; and Mrs. Pickett is the oldest 
of the family. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Pickett resulted in 
the birth of four children: John F., born Aug. 23, 1859, is a car- 
penter and mechanic and resides at Chester, in Wayne township; 
Benjamin E., born Dec. 5, 1861, is a farmer and resides in Web- 
ster township, also having a residence in the city of Richmond; 
Minnie May, born Feb. 17, 1S64, is the wife of Elmer E. Hall, 
a machinist, in Richmond; and William Elmer, born Feb. 19, 1868, 
is engaged in the grocery business in Richmond. Mr. Pickett, 
politically, sides with the Democratic party, although he was 
a Republican until 1898, but he has little to do with public af- 
fairs. His course as a farmer has been marked with thorough- 
ness and skill, and as a citizen he is held in high regard. His 
religious faith is expressed by membership in the Orthodox 
Friends' church, in which faith he was born. 

Edward Frederick Deitemeyer is a native son of Wayne 
county and one who has done his full share in the development 
of the natural resources, as is evidenced by his devotion to the 
basic industry of agriculture. He was born on the old home- 
stead in Wayne township, this county, March 10, 1867, son of 
Adam and Louisa (Lauman) Deitemeyer (see sketch of Charles 
H. Deitemeyer). Edward F. Deitemeyer received his education 
at the old Starr schoolhouse in Wayne township, and also attended 
one term of school in District No. 10. He remained subject to 
his father's orders until twenty-one years old, although he worked 
for others from the time he was fourteen. He remained at the 
parental home until twenty-five years old, wdien he rented an 
eighty-acre farm adjoining the old homestead and resided there 
three years. He then rented an adjoining farm on the south, 



59& MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

which tract was then owned by Harry C. Lintner, and this he 
operated six years. In November, 1900, he purchased the farm 
where he resides, moving on to the place, Feb. 19, 1902. The original 
purchase consisted of 136 acres, but in 1907 he purchased the old 
homestead, consisting of 130 acres, and hence his landed posses- 
sions amount to 266 acres. He has the old homestead rented to 
Charles A. Brown, and also has a man operating the place where 
he resides, while Mr. Deitemeyer farms but a small portion him- 
self, giving his attention to looking after his interests and to the 
raising of stock. While his residence is in Webster township the 
greater part of his land is in Wayne township. In 191 1 he erected 
a barn, modern in every way, and in 1905 remodeled his dwell- 
ing house. He gives an unswerving allegiance to the time-hon- 
ored principles of the Democratic party and his religious affilia- 
tions are with St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Richmond. Mr. 
Deitemeyer was married in Franklin township, Aug. 24, 1892, to 
Miss Emma Anna Heitbrink, born in Richmond, May 3, 1869, 
daughter of John Frederick and Anna Mary (Griswell) licit- 
brink, born in Hanover, Germany, the father on May 21, 1840, 
and the mother on Jan. 8, 1842. They were married in Germany 
and came to America in October, 1865, locating in Richmond, 
where the father worked as an employe in various capacities about 
four years. He was then employed as engineer in the Wiggins 
Tannery sixteen years, at the end of which time he purchased a 
farm one and one-half miles north of Core's Mill, in Franklin town- 
ship, lie resided on this farm twenty years and then, leasing 
it to others, moved to Richmond, where he has since lived re- 
tired. He and his good wife became the parents of three children: 
Henry )ohn, born May 30, 1864, in Germany, married Anna M. 
Kehlenbrink, born April 6, 1866, daughter of Ex-Councilman 
Henry Kehlenbrink, and his widow resides in Richmond, his death 
having occurred June 26, 1896; Katherine Mary, born June 24, 
1867, resides with her parents, and Mrs. Deitemeyer is the young- 
est of these children. The son, Henry J., learned the banking 
business under Daniel Reid and John B. Dougan, and in 1884 be- 
came connected with the State National Bank at Logansport, 
first as teller and later as cashier, which position he held when 
he died, after a residence there of twelve years. His remains 
were brought back to Richmond for interment upon a train ar- 
riving at the same hour of the same day and month that marked 
his departure twelve years before. He left one son, Russell Alvin, 
born Oct. 24, 1890, now in his Junior year at Purdue University, 
studying electrical engineering". Mr. and Mrs. Deitemeyer have 
no children, but have taken to rear Laura Marie Neff, born April 

7- l8 95- 

Willis D. Rich, a prominent agriculturist of the township of 
Wayne, is a native of Wayne township. lie was born on the 
old Rich homestead, Jan. 9, 1858, son of William C. Rich (see 
sketch). Willis D. Rich acquired his educational training at the 
Starr and Sevastopool schools in Wayne township. He worked on 
his father's farm until he attained his majority and then continued 



BIOGRAPHICAL 599 

with his father four years longer as an employe. He then rented 
from his father for another period of four years. lie was frugal 
and saved most of his earnings, and, in 1S87, purchased a farm 
of forty-five acres adjoining his present home. Later he pur- 
chased the farm of sixty acres where he resides. By carrying 
on an extensive system of drainage and fertilization he has 
greatly increased the productiveness of the soil and has so im- 
proved the buildings that to-day he has what would in common 
parlance be. termed an up-to-date farm, lie does a wholesale 
dairy business and general farming, lie is a Republican in poli- 
tics, but has never been an aspirant for public office. Fraternally 
he belongs to the Woodward lodge of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and also to the Red Men. lie was united in matri- 
mony to Miss Emma Naoma Duffee, daughter of Alexander and 
Sarah J. ( McCo\ ) Duffee, on Nov. 20,' 1884. Both of these 
parents were born in the Keystone State and migrated in an early 
day to Indiana, where for several years the father pursued the 
occupation of a carpenter. lie died Jan. 7, 191 1, and the mother 
resides with their only child, Mrs. Rich, born April 3, 1858. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Rich were born the following children: Marjorie, 
born Jul} r 31, 1885, is the wife of George P. Unthank, of Rich- 
mond, and they have one child, Bernice, born Sept. 16, 1910; Omar 
A., born April 23. 1887, and Ernest B., Nov. 24, 1894. 

Milton L. Davis, a popular fanner of the township of Wayne, 
is a native of Wayne count)', horn in Center township, about one 
mile west of his present home, Aug. 15, 1844. tlis father, William 
M. Davis, a native of Pennsylvania, born Nov. 20, 1799, a farmer 
by occupation, was brought to Wayne count)', in 1800, by his 
parents, and became a land-owner in Center township and later 
in Wayne township, where he passed away, on the farm where 
his son, Milton L., resides, March 24, 1887. The mother of Milton 
L. Davis — Nancy Lyons — was born in New Jersey in 1802, and 
died Aug. 21, 1868. There were nine children in their family: 
Charlotte, born Jan. 15, 1824, died May 12, 1895; Barbara Ann, 
born Aug. 6, 1825, died Jan. 22, 1890; Esther, born Aug. 25, 1827, 
died Jan. 11, 1889; Ida jane, born Dec. 20, 1829, died in infancy; 
Daniel Dale, born Jan. 7, 1834, and Elizabeth, born Jan. 21, 1835, 
are deceased; Lovisa, born March 17, 1837, died in infancy; Mar- 
guerite Jane, horn Aug. 31, 1840, died Aug. 4, 1855; ar >d Milton 
L. is the youngest and the only one surviving. The last named 
received his schooling in the district schools of Wayne township 
and also attended a few terms at the Culbertson schoolhouse in 
Center township. He worked upon the parental farm until the 
age of twenty-two years, when he took charge of its operation 
and has resided there continuously since, the place being com- 
posed of thirty-six acres. He has improved and enlarged the 
buildings on the place and during his active career conducted a 
general farming business. Since 1904 he has rented his fields out, 
being seriously afflicted with sciatic rheumatism. The house was 
built by his father about 1857. Mr. Davis was engaged in tile 
manufacturing for several years, aside from farming, and about 



600 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

eight years conducted a threshing outfit. Politically Mr. Davis is 
a Democrat and has never aspired to public office. On March 28, 
1866, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Indiana Turner, born 
in what is now Fairview, Wayne township, Feb. 8, 1848, daugh- 
ter of Jesse and Anna (Barton) Turner, and of this happy union 
six children were burn: Esther, born March 31, 1867, is the 
wife of Jesse Brower, a traveling salesman of Cincinnati, and she 
has two sons by a former marriage, Frederick and Fade Kuhl- 
man ; William IF, born Aug. 15, 1868, is engaged in the black- 
board business at Grand Rapids; Sarah M., horn April 26, 1870, is 
the wife of William E. Bryant, a mason contractor of Richmond, 
and they have five children — Hazel, James, Martha, Ernest and 
Pearle ; Mary Elizabeth, born June 12, 1872, died July 10, 1892; 
Martha, born Sept. 4, 1877, is the wife of Allen Irvin, a farmer 
in Webster township; and Howard IF, born Jan. 17, 1883, is a rail- 
road man and resides in Cincinnati. He married Cora Ponder 
and they have two children — Feo Dale and Lucile. Mrs. Davis' 
father, a carpenter by occupation, was a native of Wayne county, 
born June 27, 1817, and here followed his trade. He retired from 
active work a lew years prior to his death, Dec. K), 1881. llis 
wife died Feb. 8, 1S87. In their family were eight children: 
William IF, born Jan. 9, 1841, died July 12, 1S64, at Atlanta, Ga., 
in the enemy's hands, having been wounded and taken prisoner 
while serving as a soldier in the Civil war; Samuel, born Feb. 25, 
1844, died April 22, 1865, in a Federal hospital in the city of 
Washington, having contracted a disease of the lungs while in 
the service during the Civil war; Sarah, born Jan. 10, 1846, died 
Nov. 9, 1886; Mrs. Davis is the next in order of birth; Margaret 
Virginia, born Dec. 6, T850, died Feb. 6, 1887; Franklin, born Sept. 
12, 1853, died Sept. 1, i860; Oliver Jeptha, born July 13, 1850, 
died July 7, 1889; an( ' Martha Jane, born Feb. 6, 1867, died March 
10, 1S90. The mother was born at Waynesville, Ohio, Feb. 14, 
1823. 

Michael Kendall is one of the progressive farmers of Wayne 
township, where he was born and reared, and where the family 
has been a prominent and highly respected one for the past sev- 
enty-five years. Michael Kendall was born in the township of 
Wayne, on a farm adjoining his present place of residence, April 
9, 1856, son of William and Abigail (Weesner) Kendall, born in 
North Carolina, the father on Aug. 17, 1808, and the mother on 
Oct. 10, 1812. Thomas Kendall, the paternal grandfather, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Harvey, in North Carolina, and they came to In- 
diana in an early day, fust settling where the waterworks plant 
is located in the city of Richmond. The grandmother died there, 
and later the grandfather sold that property and lived with his 
children until his death, in 1861, in Henry county, at the residence 
of a son, and his remains are interred in Whitewater cemetery. 
The maternal grandparents came to Wayne county about 1824 and 
settled on the township line, between New Garden and Wayne. 
There the grandfather died July 10, 1869. The grandmother died 
April 16, 1836, and after her death the grandfather married Feah 



BIOGRAPHICAL fol 

Pegg, Feb. 16, 1843,- an d continued to reside on the homestead 
until his death. lie was a conscientious Quaker in his religious 
affiliations. The parents of Michael Kendall were married in 1833 
and first settled near Short Creek, south of Richmond, where they 
resided until 1836, and then removed to the farm just north of 
the one now occupied by their son, Michael. There, in the course 
of a long and active career, the father developed for himself and 
family one of the finest homesteads in the township. He cleared 
the land, erected the necessary buildings, and for some years be- 
fore his death, Feb. 6, 1861, was able to enjoy in peace and quietude 
the results of his early hardships and endeavors. His good wife 
followed him to the other shore, dying March 25, 1879. They were 
the parents of twelve children, particular mention of whom fol- 
lows: Mahlon, born May 2. 1834, died April 2, 1886; Enos, born 
Oct. 22, 1835, is living retired at Thornton, Boone count}- ; Jane, 
born Sept. 5, 1837, died April 9, 1908; Harvey, born March 24, 
1839, died -April 16, 1S57; Lizzie, born April 4, 1841, married 
Theodore F. Wilson on Sept. 29, 1880, and they are both deceased, 
he dying June 3, 190(1, and she on March 24, 1909; Wilson, born 
May 7, 1843, married Martha S. Weesner on Aug. 30, 1805, and 
they reside in Wayne township; Thomas, born March 9, 1845, 
died June 9, 1853; Eveline, born April io, 1847, died May 23, 
1804; Leah, born Aug. 4, 1849, resides on the old homestead; Re- 
becca, born June 29, 1851, died Oct. 9, 1854; Michael is the next 
in order of birth; and Margaret, born March 30, 1858, resides on 
the old homestead. The father filled various local offices and was 
highly esteemed by his neighbors as a man of honor and useful- 
ness in the community. Michael Kendall received his preliminary 
education in the district schools of Wayne township, attended the 
Webster High School one year, and was a student four terms in 
Earlham College. He was five years old when his father died 
and remained with his mother until sixteen years old, and then 
he and his mother managed the farm until her death. In 1880 he 
purchased fifty-one acres of land where he resides and began de- 
veloping a farm of his own. He soon purchased an additional 
twenty acres, making a total acreage of seventy-one, all nicely im- 
proved and very productive, upon which he follows general farm- 
ing. He is a Republican in his political views and for several 
years has been the incumbent of the office of member of the ad- 
visory board; having also served as supervisor. His religious faith 
is expressed by membership in the Friends' church. On Oct. 2, 
1883, Mr. Kendall was married to Martha E. Ryan, born in North 
Carolina, Jan. 17, 1854, daughter of William and Mary (Rees) 
Ryan. Of this union were born two children : Alsie M., born 
Sept. 26, 1884, became the wife of Edwin G. Crawford, Jan. 2, 
1907, and they reside in Richmond, where the husband is a book- 
keeper for the Second National Bank; and Wallace W., born 
April 7, 1895, is a student in the high school at Richmond. The 
father of Mrs. Kendall was born in North Carolina, Oct. 4, 1831, 
and her mother was a native of Virginia, born March 19 of the 
same year. The father was a farmer by occupation, having come 



6o2 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

to Wayne county in October, 1857, and he followed that occupa- 
tion until his death, June 13, 1902, and his widow now resides in 
Richmond. They were married in North Carolina, Oct. 20, 1850, 
and became the parents of nine children: Louise, born in 1851, 
died in infancy, as did also the second child; Mrs. Kendall is the 
third in order of birth; Joseph A., born Nov. 24, 1855, resides in 
Richmond; William B., born Dec. 28, 1857, is a farmer and re- 
sides in Wayne township; Elenora M., born March 16, i860, re- 
sides with her mother; Essie A., born Aug. 28, 1863, is the wife 
of Thomas C. Taylor, engaged in the livery and sale stable busi- 
ness at Richmond; Anna, born Dec. 6, 1865, is the wife of William 
C. Pickett, of Richmond; and Rees M., born Sept. 3, 1874, is a 
mechanic and resides with his mother. 

Theodore Smith Martin, whose line homestead farm is located 
conveniently near the city of Richmond, has there maintained his 
home during all the years of his active life and is one of the hon- 
ored citizens of the county, now living virtually retired, but still 
maintaining an active interest in the supervision of his farm. lie 
comes of a long line of American ancestry, the family having been 
established in Pennsylvania in an early day. Theodore S. Martin 
was horn in Wayne township, May 3, 1849, a son °f Benjamin L. 
and Sarah (Christman) Martin, natives of Pennsylvania, the former 
born Dec. 27, 1806, and the latter Sept. 3, 1807. The father was 
reared on a farm in Pennsylvania, where he was married, and 
early in life became a school teacher. He and his wife came to 
Indiana in the earl}' '40s and located at Goshen, Wayne township, 
making the journey overland. Here he began teaching school 
and also worked in the saw mill operated by his father, who had 
preceded him to Indiana. He later received the appointment as 
deputy auditor of Wayne county, and in 1854 was elected auditor, 
which position he held continuously until 1863. About this time 
he established what is now the Union National Bank at Richmond, 
then located at Centerville, and was elected cashier of that in- 
stitution; but before entering upon the duties was appointed by 
Governor Morton as paymaster in the army, in which position he 
served until the close of the Civil war. He then returned to his 
farm in Wayne township and also engaged several years in the 
pork-packing business in Richmond, but this he later discontinued 
and devoted the residue of his life to the farm, where he and 
his wife continued to reside until their deaths, he dying May 31, 
1904, and she in July, 1889. The father served two terms as repre- 
sentative from Wayne county in the State legislature. Concern- 
ing their children the following brief data are given: Rebecca L. 
is the wife of William L. Boyd, of Richmond; William C. oper- 
ates a stock ranch in Montana; Theodore S. is the youngest of 
the family; and the others, six in number are deceased. Theodore 
S. Martin gained his rudimentary education in the schools of Cen- 
terville, but at the age of sixteen left school to assist his father. 
He resided with his parents until married, after which he worked 
his father's farm one year. In 1874 he purchased a farm of no 
acres in Wayne township, adjoining his present home, where he 



IlKMiKAl'JIK'.M (m)} 

M iil.il m |>< hi I Minn ynil.M mill I li< 1 1 |tll|iliiifii-i| llir Iwrjily mm 
;/'/' : -, wllV.li 1 . \lti IV:<1'\' •< Uil'l lu will' 1/ \i' i'l/lo'/f<| mi ;i'('/iml n\ 
school advantages, lie owns 290 acres and lias recently given 
his son fifty-five acres. He has developed this property into one 
of the fine farms of the county, making the best of improvements, 
including the erection of a handsome modern residence. He 
operated the land himself until 1905, since which year the man- 
agement has been in the hands of his son and son-in-law, the land 
being maintained under a high state of cultivation. Mr. Martin 
buys and feeds hogs for the market and also sells fertilizer for 
an Indianapolis firm, lie is a staunch Republican in politics, he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
their attractive home is a center of gracious hospitality. At Green- 
field, Ind., May 8, 1873, Mr. Martin was united in marriage to 
Miss Rebecca Frances Foley, born in Hancock county, Indiana, 
Dec. 17, 1S50, daughter of James P. and Eliza (Templeton) Foley, 
the father being a native of Kentucky, burn in 1804, and the 
mother burn in Virginia, April 11, 1S11. The father died near 
Greenfield, Ind., in 1864, and the mother passed the closing years 
of her life at the same place, where she died Sept. 1, 1889. They 
were the parents of seven children: Mansfield is living retired 
at Indianapolis ; Mar) M. is the wife of L. \Y. Gooding, a lawyer, 
of Greenfield; Letitia is the widow of Freeman II. Crawford and 
resides at Howard, Kan.; Mannie J. is the wife of Milton T. Mor- 
ris, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Martin is the youngest in the family, 
and two are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Martin became the parents 
of four children: Ernest N., born July 3, 1874, married Anna 
Essmaker, is a railroad engineer, and resides in Indianapolis; 
Florence May, born Nov. 18, 1877, died June 10, 1883; William 
Foley, born Jan. 10, 1880, married Hazel Eliason, of Centerville, 
resides on his father's farm, and they have one child, Virginia 
Frances, born March 21, 1910; Lulu Emma, born June 30, 1885, 
is the wife of James M. Webster, resides on the Martin homestead, 
and they have one child, Florence May, born Dec. 14, 1907. Mr. 
Martin is a member of Woodard Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Richmond. The father of Mrs. Martin came to 
Indiana in early life and engaged in the mercantile business at 
Knightstown some years, being a stockholder and director in the 
old Indiana Central (now the Pennsylvania) railroad. He at one 
time engaged in buying and driving stock to Cincinnati, before the 
days of railroad transportation, and later settled near Greenfield, 
where he died. He was at one time a member of the Indiana 
legislature. 

Nathan W. Martin was one of the substantial and highly re- 
spected citizens of Wayne county. He was a native of Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, born Oct. 5, 1834, son of Penjamin L. and 
Sarah (Chrisman) Martin, natives of the same county and State, 
the father born Dec. 24, 1806, and the mother Sept. 3, 1807. The 
father was a teacher in early life. Nathan W. Martin accom- 
panied his parents to Indiana at the at^e of seven years, received 
his education in the schools of Centerville and Goshen, in Wayne 



604 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

township, and at the age of fourteen years began to work for 
others in various occupations, being employed on the river be- 
tween Cincinnati and New Orleans one year. Among others, he 
worked for William Parry, of Wayne township, nine years, and 
after his marriage rented a farm from his father, across the ruad 
from the old Martin homestead. Later, he removed to another of 
his father's farms, adjoining, and resided on these two farms 
twelve years. He was an economical man and in due lime had 
saved sufficient funds to purchase a farm of 160 acres in Frank- 
lin township. His first duties there were to finish clearing his 
land and reclaim it from the wilderness. Later he sold sixty 
acres and continued to reside on his farm of £00 acres until 1900, 
when he sold it and erected the house where his widow resides 
in the city of Richmond. The house was built on a lot that had 
been the property of Mrs. Martin's father, and there the husband 
continued to reside until his death, April 8, 1907. Mr. Martin 
was, with his sun, the first rural route mail carrier to go out from 
the Richmond office, and the son, Alexander W., still continues in 
the service. The father was compelled to retire two years before 
his death, because of failing health. His politics were those of 
the Republican party but he never held any public office, other 
than supervisor. On March 4, 1S60, he was married to Artelissa 
Cheesman, born in Center township, Oct. 3, 1841, daughter of 
Alexander and Nancy (Russell) Cheesman, the former born near 
Trenton, N. J., Nov. 3, 1811, and the latter near Pickaway, Jan. 
16, 1815. In early life Mr. Cheesman did a great deal of teaming 
between Centerville and Cincinnati, although he always followed 
agricultural pursuits, lie came with his parents to Indiana, about 
1817, and the family first settled near Muncie, where his father 
resided the remainder of his life. Upon the death of the father 
the mother came to Richmond and lived the residue of her life 
with her son. To Mr. and Mrs. Nathan W. Martin were born 
the following children: Benjamin L., born Nov. 3, 1861, is em- 
ployed by Gaar, Scott & Co. and resides in the city of Richmond, 
is married to Ella N. Jeffries and they have three children — 
Harry E., Oscar N. and W. Ray A.; Mary Llmira, born May 10, 
1863; is the wife of John Livelsberger, a carpenter and cement 
worker, of Richmond, and they have one child, Erma N.; Mattie 
C, born March 22, 1865, is the wife of William G. Bennett, of 
Richmond, and they have one child, Artelissa B. ; Sarah C, born 
May 5, 1808, is the wife of Herbert Greene, of Richmond, and they 
have one child, Eunice A.; Elizabeth 11. , born July 6, 1870, died 
Aug. 5, of the same year; and Alexander W., born May 11, 1874, 
resides with his mother. 

William Alvin Morrow, one of the substantial citizens of 
Wayne township, was born just east of Chester, in that town- 
ship, Aug. 14, 1859, son of John and Rachel ( Strawbridge) Mor- 
row. The father was a native of North Carolina, born in 1806, 
and the mother was born in Wayne township, this county, Dec. 
26, 1827. The father came to Indiana with his parents when quite 
young, and they first settled in Wayne township, where they en- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 605 

tered the place which is known as the "Abram Gaar Farm," and 
later the grandfather became the owner of over 1,000 acres of 
land in Wayne township, where he spent the residue of his life. 
John Morrow, the father of William A., grew to manhood here 
and continued a resident of Wayne township. He was one of the 
first school teachers in the county and followed that occupation 
more than twenty years, his wife, whom he married when she 
was but eighteen years old, having been one of his pupils. After 
his marriage he devoted his time exclusively to farming and, like 
his father, owned considerable land in Wayne township. He re- 
sided on his farm until his death, in March, 1874, and his widow 
continued on the old homestead until her death, in February, 1903. 
They were the parents of eight children: Nancy Jane is the wife 
of Grear N. Williams, a farmer of Franklin township; Charles 
died in infancy; Joseph S. died April 14, 191 1, in Wayne town- 
ship; John C. resides east of Chester, in Wayne township; Min- 
nieola died in infancy; William A. is the next in order of birth; 
Fdwin F. is a farmer and resides in Randolph county ; and Jesse 
L. died in 1899. W r illiam A. Morrow's educational advantages 
were limited to the course prescribed in the schools at Fairview, 
Wayne township, and was fourteen years old when his father 
died. The homestead was then divided and as his share he re- 
ceived twenty-seven acres, which he at once began clearing, haul- 
ing the wood to Richmond. He was married at the age of nine- 
teen and settled on the twenty-seven acres, embarked in farming, 
and by industry, discretion and careful attention to the duties at 
hand made the venture of farming a decided success. lie has 
added to this tract from time to time and has 165 acres, most of 
it being in Wayne township, and he operates a part of the land 
himself, his son-in-law, Albert Kemp, residing on the old place 
and giving it general superintendence. In religious matters Mr. 
Morrow and his wife give devout support to the Friends' church, 
and he is prominently identified with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, Woodard Lodge, No. 212, at Richmond. Although 
he has given unswerving support to the men and measures of 
the Republican party he has never sought to become its candi- 
date for public office. On Nov. 7, 1878, Mr. Morrow was united 
in marriage to Miss Sarah A. Jelteris, born in Franklin township, 
this county, Feb. 28, 1856, daughter of Abraham Darlington and 
Mary (Williams) JefTeris. Mr. and Mrs. Jefferis were born in 
Wayne county, he in Franklin township, in 1828, and she in Wayne 
township, May 11, 1830, and they spent their entire lives in this 
county. Five children were the issue of the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Morrow: Pearl, born Sept. 3, 1879, is the wife of Albert 
Kemp, resides on the old homestead, and they have two children 
— Adelaide, born Dec. 22, 1903, and William A., born July 10, 
1907; Harry Newton, born Dec. 9, 1880, is an express messenger 
on the Pennsylvania railroad and resides in Columbus, Ohio; Kit- 
tie, born Dec. 16, 1882, died Dec. 30 of the same year; Poyal D., 
born Jan. 25, 1884, is a practicing physician and surgeon in Rich- 
mond; and Nellie J., born Dec. 9, 1885, > s a teacher in the Sevas- 



606 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

topool school in Wayne township. The father of Mrs. Morrow 
was a farmer by occupation. He became a land-owner in Wayne 
county and spent his entire active career on a farm in Franklin 
township, one and one-half miles north of Chester, dying there 
July 3, 1898. After his death his widow removed to Chester, where 
she resides, at the advanced age of eighty-two years, in the full 
possession of her faculties and in the best of health. She is the 
mother of five children : Josephine became the wife of James Joy 
and both are deceased; Mansfield was accidentally killed while 
repairing a bridge on his farm in Wayne township, in 1907; Alice- 
is the wife of David llaisley, a fanner in Franklin township; Mrs. 
Morrow is the next in order of birth; and Ella is the wife of Wil- 
liam A. Clements, a merchant, of Fountain City. 

John Harmon Shofer merits recognition in the pages of this 
publication by reason of being one of the substantial men of af- 
fairs of the city of Richmond and a worthy citizen of the county 
where the major portion of his life has been passed. Mr. Shofer 
was born in Usenbrook, Germany, Jan. 6, 1842, a son of Harmon 
and Catherine Shofer, natives of the Fatherland. They migrated 
to the United States in 1844, coming direct to Richmond, but later 
removed to Fairhaven, Preble county, Ohio, where the father 
worked in a mill. He continued in such employment at that place 
about four years and then returned to Richmond, where he died 
of cholera at 'the time of the widespread epidemic of that scourge, 
in 1849. He was a man of absolute integrity and honor, and 
while he never acquired wealth was not denied that better tribute, 
the confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He was a street 
contractor in Richmond at the time of his death. His widow 
survived him many years and died March 12, 1888, at the age of 
eighty-five years. Of their eight children, J. Harmon is next to 
the youngest in point of age and the only one living. He was 
but two years old at the time of the family removal from Ger- 
many to the United States and his early educational advantages 
were those afforded in the public schools of the city of Richmond. 
Before he had reached his majority he engaged in the horse and 
livery business and during the past fifty years has been engaged 
in that occupation, buying and selling horses and conducting a 
first-class livery, his place being the oldest established concern 
of the kind in the city of Richmond. He erected the large brick 
barn which he occupies, in 1861, and built the residence at the 
corner of Seventh and South A streets, where he resides. The 
barn is located at the corner of South Sixth and A streets. Mr. 
Shofer also conducts the livery across the street, but his prin- 
cipal line of business there is the keeping of sale horses and board- 
ing. Care and good management of his business have brought 
him deserved advancement in the world of affairs and he has rea- 
son to be proud of the success which he has gained through his 
own efforts. In politics he gives his allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party, and he is a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church. Tn the city of Richmond, in 1868, Mr. Shofer was united 
in marriage to Miss Katharine May, born in Castlebar, County 



BIOGRAPHICAL 607 

Mayo, Ireland, June 24, 1850, daughter of Bernard and Katharine 
(Burke) May, natives of County Mayo, born in about the year 
1819. They came to America about 185 1 and first settled at Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., where they resided until the death of the father. The 
mother then married Richard Stanton and moved to Ohio, and 
later, about 1880, to Richmond. Mr. Stanton was a tailor by trade 
and was engaged in that occupation here until disabled by a stroke 
of paralysis, about nine years before his death, May 7, 1907, at 
the age of ninety-five years, and he was the oldest man in Rich- 
mond at the time he died. Mrs. Shofer is the second in order of 
birth of the three children born to her parents, llcr sister, Delia, 
is the widow of William Daugherty and resides in Portland, Ore., 
and her brother, Anthony, resides in Cincinnati. Of the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Shofer were born four children : Mary Ellen, born 
Feb. 12, 1870, is the wife of John S. Fitzgibbons, a real-estate 
dealer in Richmond, and they have had born six children — Jerald 
Shofer, born Feb. 7, 1894, Rea and Roland (twins) Dec. 2, 1896, 
Mary Carmel Oct. 10, 1899 (died Feb. 1, 1901). Eileen June 6, 
1902, and Mary Isabella Nov. 19, 1908. John II., the second child 
and eldest son, born Oct. 10, 1871, died July 12. 1898; Charles 
Edward, born June 3, 1874, resides at the parental home; as does 
also Lillian May, born Nov. 8, 1881. 

Isaac Alexander Gormon, who, since Jan. 1, 1910, has been 
the incumbent of the position of Superintendent of Police in 
Richmond, and who has filled other offices with great efficiency, 
was born in Highland county, Ohio, Dec. 25, 1847. We is of 
Old Dominion stock, his father', John W. Gormon, having been 
born in Virginia in 1817, and his mother was Ammazilla Johnson, 
born Feb. 14, 1823, near Bainbridge, Ohio. The marriage of the 
parents occurred in Highland county, Ohio, and in 1858 they re- 
moved to Wayne county, Indiana, locating at Centerville, where 
they continued to live until the death of the father. The mother 
died March 5, 1911, at Richmond. Of the union of these parents 
were born six children — three sons and three daughters — and all 
are living save one daughter, the subject of this review being the 
first-born. Mrs. William Brown is deceased; Mrs. Charles Wil- 
son resides in Richmond; Joseph works for the Pennsylvania lines 
of railway; David is associated with the Interurban railway at 
Richmond, and Mrs. Homer Hammond resides in the same city. 
The two younger children were born at Centerville, Wayne 
county, and all were educated at that place. Although a mere 
boy when the Civil war was in progress, Isaac A. Gormon offered 
his services to his country and served three months as a member 
of the Seventh Indiana cavalry during the closing days of that 
great conflict. Learning the trade of a blacksmith in his youth, 
he came to Richmond in 1866 and worked at that occupation until 
1877. In 1878 he was appointed deputy sheriff of Wayne county 
under Sheriff William H. Trindall and served in that capacity 
four years. In 1882, by election, he was elevated to the position 
of sheriff, was re-elected in 1884 and successfully held the office 
until 1886. During his incumbency of the office of sheriff it be- 



608 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

came his duty to officiate at the hanging of a condemned mur- 
derer, the last man hanged in the county jails of the State in In- 
diana. Hon. Henry U. Johnson, afterwards a prominent mem- 
ber of the United States Congress, was at that time a senator 
in the Indiana legislature, and at the request of Sheriff Gormon 
introduced a bill, which became a law, providing for the execu- 
tion of all death sentences in the penitentiaries of the State. Thus 
was brought about a much needed reform and Mr. Gormon justly 
claims the credit for the same. Following his retirement from 
the office of sheriff Mr. Gormon operated as a detective for the 
Pennsylvania lines of railway about sixteen years, his field of 
work being mostly on the Southwest system. He later was 
appointed, by Governor Mount of Indiana, to the position of mem- 
ber of the Police Board of the State and served in that capacity 
throughout the administrations of Governors Mount and Durbin, 
until 1903, when he resigned to accept the position of Superin- 
tendent of Police of Richmond. He resigned the last named po- 
sition in 1905 and for the ensuing five years did special detective 
work for corporations and other parties, meeting with unusual 
success in that line. On Jan, 1, 1910, he again was inducted into 
the office of Superintendent of Police at Richmond and is filling 
the position with his usual faithfulness and ability. Politically 
he is a member of the Republican party, fraternally is affiliated 
with Richmond Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
with Iola Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of which he is a charter mem- 
ber, and he also has membership in the Commercial Club. On 
June 21. 1871, occurred his marriage to Mrs. Mary E. Moore, nee 
Strickler, daughter of John Strickler, of Cincinnati, where Mrs. 
Gormon was reared and educated. To Mr. and Mrs. Gormon was 
born a son, Elmer A., who now has charge of the Secret Service 
department for the State of Michigan. He was born in Richmond, 
Oct. 26, 1873, and was educated in the public schools there and 
at Purdue University. He married Miss Grace D. Detch, of Rich- 
mond, and they have one daughter, Irene, fourteen years of age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gormon reside at 130 Fort Wayne avenue. 

Bernard H. Moorman, deceased, was a worthy representative 
of the intelligence, the integrity, and the moral worth of those 
Germans who have contributed so much to the building up of our 
great commonwealth. He was born in Richmond. Inch, Sept. 22, 
1854, son of Joseph Henry and Anna Mary (Neinaber) Moorman, 
natives of Osnabruck, Germany, but immigrants to America in 
early life, and they spent the period oi their activities in Richmond, 
where they died. The father was a stockman by occupation. Ber- 
nard 11. Moorman received a very thorough education in the 
schools of his native city and from the age of twenty-one years 
was engaged in the wholesale and retail liquor business, continuing 
in that occupation until about ten years prior to his death, which 
occurred March 18, 1908. lie was a successful business man in 
whatever he undertook and was self-made in the fullest sense of 
that term. His place of business in Richmond was located at 2,1-23 
North Eisfhth street. On Feb. 1, i Sjf >, he took to himself a wife 




BERNARI : H MOORMAN 



BIOGRAPHICAL 609 

and helpmate in the person of Miss Jeannette Turpin, born in 
Charleston, Ohio, but reared and educated in Richmond, a daugh- 
ter of John A. Turpin, long' a prominent and highly respected citi- 
zen of Richmond. To Mr. and Mrs. Moorman was born a daughter, 
Harriet, the wife of Galen Lamb, of Richmond, a traveling sales- 
man for J. M. Brady & Company, 30-34 West Twenty-sixth street, 
Xew York City, manufacturers of ladies' custom-made cloaks and 
suits, and they have a son, .Moorman Lamb, born in Richmond, 
ddie daughter and mother reside together, as Mr. Lamb's business 
necessitates his being away from home a great deal of the time. 
Mrs. Lamb was bom in Xew Castle, I ml., but was educated in 
Richmond, graduating at the high school there with the class of 
1897, and she also look special work at Karlham College. In poli- 
tics Mr. Moorman was an adherent of the Republican part)', but 
never aspired to hold office, llis religious associations were with 
St. Andrews' Catholic Church of Richmond, of which he was a de- 
vout member. Fraternally, he had membership in the Benevolent 
and Protective ( )rder of Elks, being a charter member of the lodge 
at Richmond, and prior to its organization was a member of the 
lodge at Albany, Inch Mrs. Moorman and her daughter reside in 
a home pleasantly located at 1 133 Main street, in the city of Rich- 
mond. 

Matthew Franklin Barker, who was a prominent resident and 
substantial citizen of Wayne township, was born in Richmond, 
link, Feb. 19, 1806, and died on his farm in \\ r ayne township, Aug. 
26, 1907, having been a resident on that place about thirty-seven 
years. Mr. Marker was reared on that place from the time he was 
four years old and received his education in the schools of Lair- 
view, Wayne township, lie remained with his parents until they 
died, and then, being an only child, continued on the farm of 
eighty acres, inherited from them, operating it in a general way. 
Mr. Barker was allied with the Republican party, but had no 
political aspirations, preferring instead the business he had chosen 
and the opportunity of enjoying his home, in which he was a 
devoted husband and father. On Feb. 26, 1892, he was married 
to Miss Ida Spotts, born near Milton, in Wayne county, Jan. 4, 
1870, daughter of William and Adaline (Winters) Spotts, and of 
this union were born four children: Howard L., Dec. 1, 1902; 
Marvel S. and Myron J. (twins), Aug. 25, 1904; and Ruth Ann, 
Aug. 24, 1906. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Barker con- 
tinues to reside on the farm, in order to enjoy her social rela- 
tions with her large circle of friends and also to lie near the last 
resting place of him who was near and dear to her. ddie parents 
of Mr. Barker were Matthew M. and Lydia (Brown) Barker, the 
former born on Nantucket Island, lie came to Indiana in early 
life, became a land-owner in Wayne township, and resided there 
until his death. Matthew F. Barker was a birthright member of 
the Friends' church. The parents of Mrs. Barker were born in 
Pennsylvania, the father in Berks county, Dec. 8, 1835, a »d tlie 
mother in Union count)', in 1828. ddie father died in 1890 and th,e 
mother resides with her daughter, Mrs. Barker. 



6lO MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Oliver Hawkins, of the city of Richmond, is a worthy repre- 
sentative of the third generation of the Hawkins family, a pioneer 
family of Wayne township. He was born on the old Hawkins 
homestead, within the present city limits of Richmond, Jan. 17, 
1845, an d nas spent practically his entire life in Wayne county. 
He attended school at what is known as the "Charles School- 
house," District No. 9 of Wayne township, and resided on the 
old home farm until about twenty-five years old. Then, in com- 
pany with his brother, he engaged in tile making a number of 
years, and for a time was also engaged in learning. After* his 
marriage he purchased a farm in Franklin township and engaged 
in farming there until the fall of [908, when he purchased the 
home where he resides, at 209 North Twentieth street, in the city 
of Richmond. About 1870, he and his brother Xathan went to 
Minnesota, where they purchased a tract of land and engaged in 
farming two years. Air. Hawkins still owns the farm of eighty- 
four acres in Franklin township and has an interest in the old 
Hawkins homestead, in addition to some residence properties in 
West Richmond. On March 17, 1897. he was united in marriage 
to Miss Emily Jane Townsend, a native of (..'enter township, born 
near Centcrville, Jan. 30, 1861, daughter of John M. and Elizabeth 
(Edgerton) Townsend, natives of Wayne count}'. Mr. Hawkins 
and his wife are members of the Friends' church. lie is a son of 
John and Sarah (Jessup) Hawkins, old and respected residents 
of Wayne township, the former born on the old Hawkins home- 
stead, in the present city limits (>i Richmond, Nov. 11, 1811, son 
of John Hawkins, an old pioneer of Wayne count)-. The paternal 
grandfather was born in Union county, South Carolina, where he 
was reared. In 1807 he came to Indiana, locating in Wayne 
township, where he entered the old homestead, a part of which is 
still in the possession of the Hawkins family, and there continued 
to reside until his death, in 1859. lie was one of the most highly 
respected citizens in the township and assisted in every way pos- 
sible in developing the moral and spiritual welfare of the com- 
munity. John Hawkins, Jr., father of Oliver and son of John, Sr., 
was reared on the old Hawkins homestead and educated in the 
local schools. He early decided to adopt fanning and saw-mill- 
ing as his life work and sought every means to acquaint himself 
with scientific methods in agriculture. There was not a more 
painstaking farmer in Wayne count), and he took great pride in 
keeping his farm, fences and buildings in the best condition, lie 
was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Jessup, born in Guil- 
ford county, North Carolina, in October, 1813, and they became 
the parents of eight children: Levi died in 1888; Elizabeth be- 
came the wife of William J. Brannon and died in April, 1907; 
David is living retired in the city of Richmond, as is also Nathan ; 
Oliver is the next in order of birth ; Albert died at the age of two 
years; Ellen II. is the widow of Joseph Elliott and resides in 
the city of Richmond; and Emeline is the wife of Thomas Elle- 
man, a retired farmer of Richmond. The father was a man of rare 
judgment and exceptional probity and his opinions were highly 



BIOGRAPHICAL 6l I 

respected by his friends and associates. He passed away on April 
26, 1891, at a ripe old age, and the mother preceded him in death, 
in March, 1887. The surviving children cherish the memory of 
parents whose lives are well worth emulating. 

Timothy Hart, of Wayne township, was horn in New York 
City, April 10, f835. He is a son of Michael and Ann (Hums) 
Hart, born in County Sligo, Ireland. They came to America in 
early life, making the voyage in a sailing vessel, and located in 
New York City, where the father worked as a laborer. Some 
years later they removed to Philadelphia, but soon thereafter the 
father died and the mother returned to New York City, where 
she also passed away, when the son Timothy was a small boy. 
They were the parents of four children, but so far as is known all 
of 'them are deceased, with the exception of Timothy. He re- 
ceived his educational training in Chester count), Pennsylvania, 
and in the district schools of Wayne township, of which he has 
been almost continuously a resident since childhood. His parents 
having died when he was very young, a gentleman named Thomas 
Maule took him as a bound boy, and after a short residence in 
Pennsylvania brought him to Indiana, locating in Wayne town- 
ship, this count)-. I'ntil he had reached the age of about twenty 
years Mr. 11 art made his home with Mr. Maule. and then began 
to learn the carpenter trade with Mahlon Bond, who resided near 
Goshen, this count)'. Later, he engaged as a farm hand and was 
so employed until Jul)' 6, 1861, when he enlisted as a private in 
Company II of the Nineteenth Indiana infantry, for service in the 
Civil war. This regiment was organized and mustered in at In- 
dianapolis, Jul) 29, 1801. On Aug. 9 it joined the Army of the 
Potomac at Washington. Its first engagement was at Lewinsville, 
Ya., Sept. 11. It next fought at Falls Church, after which it went 
into quarters at Fort Craig, near Washington. On March 10, 
1802, it was attached to McDowell's (First) corps, with which 
it moved toward Fredericksburg and then toward the Shenan- 
doah Valley. It remained at YVarrenton until Aug. 5, when it 
made a reconnoissance toward Spottsylvania Court I louse. It 
then joined General Pope's army and fought at Cedar Mountain, 
Gainesville, and the second Hull Run. After the second battle 
of Bull Run it was stationed for a time at Washington, then moved 
to Frederick City, Md., and when Lee began his invasion of Mary- 
land moved with Hooker's corps in pursuit. It fought at South 
Mountain and at Antietam. At Fredericksburg the regiment was 
in the Fourth brigade, First division, First corps, but was only 
slightly engaged. It then went into winter quarters until the be- 
ginning of General Hooker's Chancellorsville campaign, when it 
was in an engagement at Fitzhugh's Crossing of the Rappahan- 
nock. It was in position- at Chancellorsville, but was not called 
into action. It was then attached to the First brigade, First di- 
vision, First corps, which was the first of the infantry to engage 
the enemy at Gettysburg, July 1, 1803. The regiment aided in 
the capture of Archer's Confederate brigade. During the other 
two days of the fight it occupied a position on Cemetery Hill, but 



6l2 MEMOIRS Dl" WAYNE COUNTY 

was not seriously engaged. It then took part in the Mine Run 
campaign and passed the winter near Culpeper. It broke camp 
at the beginning of the Wilderness campaign ; was engaged at the 
Wilderness, Laurel Hill, about Spottsylvania, at the North Anna 
River, and Cold Harbor; and was then constantly on duty in the 
trenches before Petersburg until the end of the siege, and Air. 
Hart was mustered out of the service at Petersburg, Va., July 
28, 1864. lie is the proud possessor of a brigade badge, which 
was presented to him by Captain Dudley, at a reunion of the "Iron 
Brigade," held in Wisconsin. After being mustered out of the 
service, Mr. Hart worked as a farm hand one year and then for 
two years operated a farm in Darke county, Ohio. He then came 
to the farm where he now resides, where he has sixty acres of 
fine arable soil, and his farm is recognized as one of the best 
equipped and improved in the community. In the matter of poli- 
tics Mr. Hart is a staunch Democrat and has been the incumbent 
of the office of school director. On March 8, 1866, was solemnized 
the marriage of .Mr. Hart and Miss Rachel Kerlin, born in Foun- 
tain City (then Newport), June 23, 183S, daughter of Elijah Isles 
and Millie Malinda (Sands) Kerlin. Mr. and Mrs. Kerlin were 
born in Tennessee, the former on Oct. 22, 1800, and the latter on 
Feb. 23, 1 803. The father came to Indiana in early life, locating 
just north of Richmond. There he followed the calling of a farmer 
a number of years. Then, after a short residence in Fountain City, 
he purchased the place where Mr. Hart resides and thereafter was 
engaged in farming until the time of his death, which occurred at an 
advanced age, his wife having passed away some years before his 
demise. Three children were the issue of the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hart: Mary Jane, born Nov. 26, 18C7, is the wife of Charles 
Huffman, of Wayne township; Mattie Bell, born Feb. 8, 1869, is the 
wife of Dora Wample, a mechanic, of Richmond; and Elijah Irvin, 
born March 4, 1876, resides at the parental home. Mrs. Hart is the 
only living child of eleven children born to her parents. 

Henry John Hartman, deceased, was a descendant of a fine old 
German stock. He was born June 22, 1855. in Germany, son of 
Frederick and Clara Hartman, r.dtives of Germany, where they 
lived out their allotted lives and passed away. The son attended 
the excellent schools of the Fatherland, and when a boy of about 
sixteen years was apprenticed to the tailor trade, which occupation 
he followed after coming to America, until married. On Feb. 27, 
1887, he was united in marriage to Anna Romberg, born in Rich- 
mond, Feb. 27, 1865, daughter of Henry and Ella (Frauman) Rom- 
berg, born in German}-. Mr. and Mrs. Hartman became the par- 
ents of six children — two sons and four daughters. Fred, born 
Dec. 17, 1890; Marie, born Nov. 16, 1892; Louisa, born Aug. 14, 
1895; Gertrude, born Sept. 1, 1897; Emma, born May 4, 1899, and 
Harry, born Aug. 20, 1904, all residing at home with their mother. 
After his marriage Mr. Hartman purchased the farm of eighty and 
one-half acres where his widow resides and engaged in the dairy 
business some years. Later he devoted his attention exclusively 
to general farming and stock raising and remained thus actively 



BIOGRAPHICAL 613 

employed until his death, Jan. 30, 1905. Mr. Ilartman was a public- 
spirited man and gained a high place in the esteem of the com- 
munity by his incorruptibility, impartial judgment and kind heart. 
He was liberal and willing to help those in need. Since his death 
Mrs. Ilartman has continued to reside on the farm, and with the 
aid of her sons operates the farm and keeps it up to a high state of 
cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Romberg, parents of Mrs. Ilartman, 
emigrated from the Fatherland to America in an early day and 
established their residence in Richmond, I ml. The father was a 
moulder by trade and upon his arrival secured employment with 
the Gaar, Scott & Company manufacturing concern. Later he 
worked for a time in the mill works at Richmond, but returned to 
Gaar, Scott & Company, by whom he was employed until his death, 
in December, 1897. The mother survives and has her residence at 
the old home at 324 South Tenth street, in the city of Richmond. 
Nine children were born to these parents, of whom Mrs. Ilartman 
is the eldest; Carrie is the wife of James Taylor and resides on 
South Twelfth street, in Richmond, her husband being engaged at 
the Wayne Works; Louisa is the wife of Charles Connors and also 
resides in Richmond, her husband being engaged in the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad yards; Ella is deceased; Henry resides in Richmond, 
employed with Gaar, Scott & Company; William is deceased; 
Minnie is a clerk in the Nusbaum store and resides at home with 
her mother, as does also Elizabeth, the wife of Albert Ireton, en- 
gaged in the yards of the Pennsylvania railroad; and Viola is de- 
ceased. 

Robert E. Jones, deceased, for a number of years one of the 
prominent machinists of the city of Richmond, was born in Wayne 
township, Wayne county, Indiana, Oct. 20, 1864, son of Oliver and 
Fannie (Gaar) Jones, born in Richmond, the father on Nov. 6, 1833, 
and the mother on Nov. 5, 1834. In early life the father was a 
moulder by trade and a considerable time was employed by Gaar, 
Scott ec Company. lie resides at 210 North Eleventh -street in the 
city of Richmond. Robert E. Jones received his scholastic train- 
ing in the ward schools of Richmond and in early life learned the 
trade of a machinist, which he followed throughout all of his active 
career, and the scene of his endeavors was the city of Richmond, 
lie was a man of great inherent ability, thrift) and industrious, 
and his efforts brought well merited results. Although he gave 
staunch support to the men ami measures of the Democratic party 
he never sought public preferment lor himself. Me was a man of 
great kindness of heart, a loving and indulgent husband and father, 
upright, honorable, and honest in all his dealings with his fellow 
men. He died Jan. 19, 1900. On Oct. 30, 1889, was .solemnized Mr. 
Jones' marriage to Miss Alice Maud Martin, a native of Williams- 
burg, Wayne county, bom July 18, 1869, daughter of Robert Ik 
and Mary J. (Forkner) Martin. Her lather 'was born Feb. 18, 
1 841, and died April 8, 1906, and her mother, a native of Economy, 
Wayne county, born Feb. 18, 1841, survives and makes her home 
with her daughter, Mrs. Jones. Robert Ik Martin was a farmer by 
occupation in his early life and was born at Williamsburg, in Green 



614 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

township. He was twenty years of age when he .emulated the ex- 
ample of Cincinnatqs by leaving the plow upon hearing the fife 
and drum and enlisting as a soldier for service in the Civil war. 
After serving a term of enlistment with the three-months troops 
he re-enlisted as a private in Company I) of the Fifty-seventh In- 
diana infantry for three years, and was successively promoted to 
second lieutenant, first lieutenant, and captain. This regiment was 
recruited in the Fifth and Eleventh Congressional districts and was 
organized at Richmond in November, 1861. It was mustered in 
Nov. 18 and left the State Dec. 23, reporting to General Buell at 
Louisville, where it was assigned to the Sixth division, Army of 
the Ohio, and ordered to Bardstown, Ky. It moved to Lebanon 
and on Feb. 12, 1862, to Munfordville, and thence to Nashville. It 
started for Pittsburg Landing March 21, and was actively engaged 
at Shiloh. It participated in the siege of Corinth and moved from 
there to Northern Alabama, where it remained until July, when it 
was ordered to Tennessee. It was on duty near Tullahoma and 
MeMinnville until September and then took an active part in the 
campaign against Bragg in Kentucky, being in the battle of Perry- 
ville. It was at Nashville during most of December, guarding for- 
age trains and engaged in frequent skirmishes. At the battle of 
Stone's River it was attached to the left wing of the army and dis- 
tinguished itself by its gallantry in resisting the fierce attacks 
made upon the lines at that point. It was in camp near Murfrees- 
boro during the winter and spring of 1863, took part in Reynolds' 
"eleven days' scout" in April, and participated in the campaign 
against Tullahoma. It was in camp near Pelham until Aug. 16, 
when it joined in the campaign toward Chattanooga and operated 
on the north side of the Tennessee opposite that city, its brigade 
taking possession of Chattanooga on its evacuation after the battle 
of Chickamauga. Its commander, Colonel Lennard, was then as- 
signed as provost-marshal and the regiment was placed on duty as 
provost guard. It was in the battle of Missionary Ridge and was 
then assigned to the Second division (Sheridan's), Fourth corps, 
which formed a part of the column sent to the relief of Burnside at 
Knoxville. A majority of the members of the regiment, including 
Mr. Martin, re-enlisted on Jan. 1, 18O4, and were furloughed home 
in March. The)" rejoined the Fourth corps May 5, and took part in 
the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, 
Adairsville, Allatoona, New I lope Church, where the regiment 
suffered severely, and in the heavy skirmishes about Kenesaw 
Mountain. In the assault of June zj the regiment formed the 
skirmish line in front of the assaulting column of the Fourth corps; 
was on the skirmish line at Peachtree Creek; was then in the 
trenches before Atlanta until Aug. 25, and was engaged at Jones- 
boro. It accompanied its division to Chattanooga, took part in 
driving Hood into Alabama, and was with Thomas' army which 
resisted the enemy's invasion of Tennessee. It was engaged at 
Franklin, with heavy loss, especially in prisoners, and was in the 
battle of Nashville, after which it moved to II untsville, Ala., 'in 
pursuit of Hood, remaining there until spring. It moved into Ten- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 615 

nessee in April, 1865, proceeding from Bull's Gap to Nashville, in 
July was transferred to Texas, being stationed at Port Lavaca, and 
was mustered out Dec. 14, 1865. After being honorably discharged 
from the military service Mr. Martin again engaged in farming, 
which he followed until 1S71, and then removed to Richmond, 
where he engaged in the grocery business for several years. Fol- 
lowing this he was engaged in the wholesale commission business 
until 1901, when he disposed of his mercantile interests in Rich- 
mond and removed to Des Moines, Iowa, where he resided two 
years. In 1903 he went to Stone county, Arkansas, and took up a 
soldier's timber claim, remaining there eighteen months, and in 
October, 1905, returned to Richmond. While engaged in the 
wholesale commission business he also conducted a grocery store 
at Williamsburg three years. He and his good wife became the 
parents of four children: James Monroe, born Nov. 28, 1867, is a 
salesman of the National Cash Register and resides at Indianapolis; 
he is married to Lilly Le Fever and they have two children — Har- 
old and Mildred. Alice M. is the widow of Robert E. Jones; Araer 
F., born March 20, 1872, is a clothing merchant at Dallas, Tex.; 
he married Josephine Perkins and they have one child, Dorothy. 
Cora L., born April 25, 1875, died Aug. 8, 1879. After the death of 
Mr. Jones his widow went to Iowa with her parents and resided 
there about four years. She then returned to Richmond and has 
since continued to reside in that city, being a stockholder in the 
establishment of Gaar, Scott & Company. Of her union with Mr. 
Jones was born a daughter, Fannie Elizabeth, born Aug. 31, 1890, 
a graduate of Earlham College in the class of 1911, and she resides 
at home with her mother. 

Charles H. Burchenal, who died at his residence in the city of 
Richmond, Ind„ Dec. 7, 1896, was a native of the State of Mary- 
land and a scion of one of its old and honored pioneer families. His 
remote ancestors were of French origin and came from the neigh- 
borhood of Caen, in Normandy. At the time of William the Con- 
queror, some members of the family settled in England, where 
they remained and kept up the name for many generations. One 
or more of them came to America with Lord Baltimore's first 
colony and settled on the Eastern shore of Maryland, where, as 
the records show, they held land at a very early period of the 
colony. Mr. Burchenal's branch of the family is descended from 
Jeremiah Burchenal, a planter (bora about 1700J in Kent county, 
Maryland, where some of the family still reside, Mr. Burchenal's 
career was emphatically one of integrity and usefulness and upon 
the record of his life rests no shadow of wrong or suspicion of 
evil. He lived up to the full measure of his powers for accom- 
plishment, was loyal and public-spirited as a citizen, and his course 
was ever guided and governed by the loftiest principles, so that 
to him was given the unequivocal confidence and esteem of his 
fellow men. llis sterling worth of character was best appreciated 
b\ those among whom he was reared and who had full knowledge 
of the various stages of his progress as one of the world's noble 
army of workers. To such men it is most fitting that a publication 



r.i6 



)!• WAYNE COUNTY 



of this nature should give specific recognition. Charles H. Burch- 
enal was born at Greensboro, Caroline county, Mar) land, Sept. 18, 
1830, a son of Jeremiah and Mary E. (Cockayne) Burchenal, na- 
tives of the same State, which contributed so large and valuable a 
contingent to the early settlement of the various counties of East- 
ern Indiana. As a child Mr. Burchenal was taken by his parents 
to Zanesville, Ohio, where his mother, a beautiful and accom- 
plished woman, died in 1836. ilis father was engaged in business 
in that place until 1838, when, while visiting his old home near 
Baltimore, Md., he too died, and the boy was brought by his 
grandmother, a member of the Society of Friends, to Wayne coun- 
ty, Indiana. Four years later, when she realized that her end was 
near, she felt much anxiety about young Charles, who, though left 
with means sufficient for his education, would be comparatively 
alone in the world. It was her wish that Achilles Williams and 
his wife, prominent Quakers of Richmond, to whom she was re- 
lated, should take the child into their home, and after her death, 
in 1842, Charles, with the consent of his guardian in Zanesville, re- 
mained with them about eight years and became deeply attached 
to the family, who cherished him as one of their own. In 1844 Mr. 
Williams was elected treasurer of Wayne count)' and moved from 
Richmond to Centerville, which was then the county seat. While 
he lived in Richmond Mr. Burchenal's preliminary educational dis- 
cipline was secured in the common schools of that city, and after 
the removal to Centerville he became a pupil in the County Semi- 
nary (then in charge of Rawson Vaile) until 1847, when he was 
appointed clerk in the office of the county treasurer, a place which 
he held until 1850. Early in that year he entered the law office of 
Newman & Siddall, and in March was recommended to the court 
as a "young man of good character who desired to study law," and 
he was allowed to sit within the enclosure of the court room, re- 
served for the lawyers, a privilege from which the general public 
was excluded. In the office of Newman & Siddall Mr. Burchenal 
made swift progress in his studies and two years later was ad- 
mitted to the bar, voluntarily submitting to an examination by a 
committee appointed by the lawyers of the county, an examination 
which he passed with credit. About the time of his admission to 
the bar he became a member of the "Dark Lyceum," a debating 
society at Centerville, an account of which is given in the first 
volume of this publication, and he became quite prominent in that 
organization. In the rooms of the order was hung the picture of 
Apellcs of Cos, drawn by Mr. Burchenal. He was extremely skill- 
ful in the use of the pencil and often during a trial would sketch 
rapidly the picture of judge, jury, and witnesses with surprising 
accuracy. After his admission to the bar, Mr. Burchenal advanced 
rapidly in the profession. In 1854 he was elected district attorney 
of the Common Pleas Court of Wayne county and served two 
years, lie never held any other office. In 1861 he moved from 
Centerville to Richmond and entered into partnership with Wil- 
liam A. Bickle (afterward judge of the Superior Court), a connec- 
tion which lasted until September, 1864. After this he practiced 



BIOGRAPHICAL 617 

law alone for many years. In 1885 he formed with John L. Rupe a 
partnership which continued until August, 1895. H' s extraordi- 
nary ability brought him at an early day to the front rank in his 
profession. He was for many years the leader of the bar, being en- 
gaged on one side or the other of nearly every important case, and 
lii-i piac I in; W a:, the |.n r «-.l .nid kit. I In. i.ilive .jj ..in ill lln- -oiin 

ty. liui, although lie had lire utnifsl ummI Imi In piolesM il 

reputation, he cared little for money, lie was not a good collector 
of the debts that were due to himself and saved but little from 
his income. In knowledge of the general principles of law, in skill 
in pleading and readiness in practice he had no superior in Indiana. 
Early in life he joined the Episcopal church and retained his mem- 
bership, always enjoying the service and mode of worship. His 
belief, however, was far from orthodox. His natural interest in re- 
ligious topics, and especially those of a more spiritual nature, led 
him to a close study of the works of Emmanuel Swendenborg, and 
his religious belief was largely founded upon them. In politics 
he was originally a Whig, having cast his first vote for General 
Scott, in 1852. When the Republican party was formed he attached 
himself to that organization and continued firm in his adherence 
to it until his death. I lis, life was redolent of kindliness and he 
made for himself a secure place in the confidence and esteem of all 
with whom he came in contact in the various relations of life. Mr. 
Burchenal married in i860 Miss Ellen Jackson, who died in 1863. 
He left one son, John Burchenal, by this marriage. In 1871 he mar- 
ried at Baltimore Miss Mary E. Day, by whom he had three daugh- 
ters — Ruth, Elizabeth and Emma — and two sons — Carlos and 
Selden. 

Henry Clay Fox, judge of the Circuit Court of Wayne county 
and one of the foremost citizens of Richmond, Ind., was born near 
West Elkton, Preble county, Ohio, Jan. 20, 1836. His father, Eevi 
Eox, was a native of New Jersey and a son of Thomas Fox, who 
was also a native of New Jersey and there spent his entire life, 
devoting his energies to farming. He was descended from the cele- 
brated Fox family of England that furnished to that nation some 
of its most eminent and prominent representatives. Thomas Eox 
married Nancy Pitman, a native of New York. Eevi Fox was al- 
ways a farmer and was an honorable, sincere and unassuming char- 
acter, who did his duty as he saw it. lie spent the days of his boy- 
hood and youth in New Jersey, and in 1810 removed to Preble 
county, Ohio, where he was extensively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his death, in 1807. lie married Miss Rebecca Inman, 
who was of Irish descent, and she passed away in 1846. In politics 
Levi Fox was an ardent Whig and a great admirer and a supporter 
of Henry Clay, wdiose name he bestowed upon his son — the future 
judge of the Wayne Count)' Circuit Court. Both he and his wife 
were active and influential members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and their labors largely promoted its usefulness, lie took 
a commendable interest in everything pertaining to the general 
welfare and was one of the prime movers of the Eaton & Hamilton 
railroad, doing much to secure its location and completion. Judge 



6l8 M F.M OIKS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Fox was reared on a farm, receiving the scholastic training afforded 
by the common schools in the vicinity of his home, and then con- 
tinued his studies in Whitewater College, in Centerville, Tnd. In 
i860 he removed from Preble county to Centerville, which was 
then the county seat of Wayne county, and began the study of 
law under the direction of George W. Julian. After pursuing a 
thorough course and largely familiarizing himself with the under- 
lying principles of jurisprudence, Mr. Fox was admitted to the 
bar in 1861, but, instead of devoting his energies to building up a 
practice, he put aside all personal considerations and offered his 
services to the government, becoming a member of Company C, 
Fifty-seventh Indiana infantry. He was made fust lieutenant and 
served thirteen months, at the end of which time he was forced 
to resign on account of failing health. During that time, however, 
he participated in the hard-fought battle of Pittsburg Landing. 
After his return home Lieutenant Fox began the practice of law, 
and for that purpose formed a partnership with Judge Nimrod II. 
Johnson, under the firm name of Johnson & Fox. In 1S75 Judge 
Fox removed from Centerville to Richmond and has since made 
his home in this city. He opened an office and successfully en- 
gaged in practicing law. In 1862 he was elected district attorney 
for the common pleas district, composed of the counties of Wayne, 
Union, Fayette and Franklin. In 1864 he was re-elected, serving 
in all four years in this office. In the year 1S78 he was elected 
judge of the Wayne Superior Court, which position he held until 
the office was abolished. On Aug. 25, 1892, Governor Chase ap- 
pointed him a judge on the appellate bench of Indiana, and he 
was nominated for the same position in that year by the Republican 
party, hut at the regular fall election he was defeated with the bal- 
ance of the Republican ticket. In the year 1896 he was elected 
judge of the Seventeenth Judicial Circuit of Indiana, which position 
he has filled to the present time by repeated re-elections. In poli- 
tics the Judge has been an ardent Republican all his life, uncom- 
promising in Ins political views. For forty-eight years he has been 
a member of the Masonic fraternity, his present membership being 
with Richmond Lodge at Richmond, tnd. In May, 1861, was sol- 
emnized Judge Fox's marriage to Miss Helen S. Linsley, of Trum- 
bull county, Ohio, and of Scotch and Welsh descent. At the time 
of her marriage she was a teacher of music, and she and her hus- 
band first met in the town of Seven Mile, Butler county, Ohio, 
where Miss Linsley was teaching music for the celebrated Pro- 
fessor Hanby, the author of the well known song, "Nellie Gray," 
and other popular ballads. Three children were the issue of the 
union of Jud:_;e and Mrs. Fox — Francis L., Frederick II., and Flor- 
ence J. The daughter is an artist of rare ability, her specialty 
being in oil painting of animals, and she also excels as a painter 
of portraits. She was for some time a pupil under Professor Bell, 
of New York. The Judge has also had some experience in literary 
matters, having a very fine library of miscellaneous books. As a 
matter of recreation he has indulged in some literary work, 'prin- 
cipally of a humorous character, and has won considerable repu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL (>KJ 

tation by the publication of a book entitled "The Adventures of a 
Philosopher, a Dun Mule and a Brindle Dog," of which two edi- 
tions were quickly sold; and another production of his pen, "Uncle 
Zeek and Aunt Eliza," has received favorable comment from a 
large number of readers. In the preparation of the historical vol- 
ume of the "Memoirs of Wayne County and the City of Rich- 
mond," he has given the benefit of his long residence in and inti- 
mate knowledge of Lenawee county by acting in the capacity of 
editor. 

John B. Dougan has gained prestige as one of the able and 
popular men of affairs of Wayne county and is at present occupy- 
ing the position of president of the Second National Bank at Rich- 
mond, lie is a member of one of the prominent families of Wayne 
county, with whose annals the name has been identified for more 
than half a century. He was born at Xiles, Mich., Dec. 14, 1847, 
a son of William and Anna (Gray) Dougan. The father was born 
in the north of Ireland, in 1809, and with his brother, George 
Dougan, came to the L'nited States about the year 1820, locating 
at Pittsburgh, Pa., where he learned the carpenter's trade, follow- 
ing that occupation in the Keystone State seven years. He also 
mastered cabinet making and became an expert mechanic. He later 
removed to Niles, Mich., where he engaged in carpentering and 
contracting, erecting the greater number of the buildings of that 
city during his residence there. He became not only one of the 
substantial men of that place, but was also a citizen to whom was 
ever accorded the fullest measure of popular confidence and esteem. 
He was a man of forceful individuality, guided his life according 
to the strictest principles of integrity and honor, and wielded much 
influence in public aftairs of a local nature. He married Anna 
Gray, a native of the north of Ireland and a daughter of Isaac and 
Martha (Bartley) Gray. Her mother was an English lady, but 
married Mr. Gray in the Emerald Isle, and they emigrated to 
America in the early '20s, their daughter, Anna, who remained in 
Ireland, joining them in America a few years later. Their first 
home was in Rockbridge county, Virginia, but after a short resi- 
dence there they came to Richmond, Incl'., Mr. Gray being one of 
the leading pioneer merchants of that city. llis last days were 
spent in Niles, Mich., where his death occurred in 1831. William 
and Anna (Gray) Dougan became the parents of six children: 
Isaac G. is a retired farmer of Spring Grove, Wayne county; Wil- 
liam is a practicing physician at Niles, Mich.; George B. is of the 
firm of Dougan & Company, insurance, of Richmond; David is a 
banker at Denver, Colo.; John B. is the next in order of birth; and 
Martha is the wife of I. T. Foster, of Richmond. The father of this 
family died in August, 1849. Eight years later, in 1857, the mother 
became the wife of Daniel Reid and by this union had two chil- 
dren: Daniel G., president of the American Tin Plate Company; 
and Virginia, who became the wife of O. H. Rogue, of Wabash, 
Ind., and died Nov. 28, 191 1. Mrs. Reid died in September, 1898, at 
the advanced age of eighty-three years. John B. Dougan spent the 
first ten years of his life in Niles, Mich., and in 1858 came with his 



620 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

family to Richmond; and he passed the remainder of his boyhood 
days under the helpful influences and discipline of the home farm 
where the family resided. There he became familiar with all the 
duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, and in 
the intervals of farm work improved the educational advantages 
afforded by the district schools of the neighborhood. In the fall 
of 1865 he returned to Niles, Mich., where he attended school for 
a year, and, thus equipped fur the practical and responsible duties 
of a business career, again came to Richmond, in September, 1866, 
and entered the First National Hank, as "messenger boy." For six 
years he remained with that institution, and his close application, 
"his faithfulness and his ability won him promotion from time to 
time until he was made general bookkeeper. In 1872, when the 
Second National Hank of Richmond was organized, he was ten- 
dered and accepted the position of cashier of that institution, con- 
tinuing in that capacity until Jan. 1, 1898, when he was elected 
vice-president, and in August, 1901, he became president, in which 
position he still continues. He is a close student of the banking 
business, in all departments of which he keeps in close touch with 
the advances made from year to year. In politics Mr. Dougan 
shows an abiding faith in the principles of the Republican part)', of 
whose cause he is a zealous supporter, and in a fraternal way is 
identified with the Masonic order, being a member of Richmond 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; King Solomon's Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons; Richmond Commandery, Knights Templars; 
and Indianapolis Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. 
In October, 1876, Mr. Dougan was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen L. Scott, a daughter of William G. Scott, deceased. They 
hold membership in the Presbyterian church, and for many years 
Mr. Dougan has served as one of its trustees. 

Isaac Jenkinson, deceased, for many years prominent in public 
life and the last surviving Indiana member of the Electoral Col- 
lege that chose Abraham Lincoln for President in i860, was born 
at Piqua, Ohio, April 29, 1825. He was a son of John Jenkinson, a 
tanner by occupation. When a small boy he moved with his par- 
ents to Deerfield, Randolph county, Indiana, a town now extinct, 
lie was appointed postmaster at that place by President Tyler 
when only seventeen years old, and when twenty-one was elected 
justice of the peace. During his young manhood he moved to 
Fort Wayne and became identified with that growing town's in- 
terests. In 1856 he was one of the organizers of the Republican 
part_\ r in Allen county and made his first Republican speech in Fort 
Wayne, then a hotbed of Democracy. When the Civil war came 
on, Governor Morton made him a recruiting officer in the State, 
and he devoted all of his time to the cause. In 1863, in partnership 
with David W. Jones, he founded the Fort Wayne "Gazette," now 
the "Journal-Gazette," and continued its publication several years. 
Jones did not remain long in the journalistic harness. The "Ga- 
zette" had a stormy voyage, but survived. Mr. Jenkinson's next 
journalistic effort found him in Richmond, where he became a pub- 
lisher of the "Palladium," already being printed weekly and now 



BIOGRAPHICAL f)2 I 

the second oldest paper in Indiana. It was founded in 1831, but 
was preceded several years by the "Western Sun," of Vincennes. 
Mr. Jenkinson established the "Palladium" in the daily held and 
continued to be its editor twenty years, during which time he 
served as postmaster at Richmond. It is a matter of local history 
that every editor of the "Palladium" has, with the exception of the 
present editor, Rudolph G. Leeds, been at some time or other the 
postmaster at Richmond. Air. Jenkinson was assigned to an impor- 
tant post by President Grant in 1869, that of consul to Glasgow, 
Scotland, and remained there until 1874. But it was in educational 
affairs that Mr. Jenkinson made what he termed his happiest rec- 
ord. Prior to 1908, when he retired, he was thirty-live years a 
member of the board of trustees of Indiana University at Bloom- 
ington. He was the president of the board for seventeen years, 
lie was also a member . of the first board of trustees of Purdue 
University at Lafayette, having been present when the site for the 
first building of that now magnificent institution was selected. One 
feature of his educational work held first place in his pride — that 
of having first advocated making Indiana University a co-educa- 
tional institution. He fought long for that cause and finally tri- 
umphed, in 18117, when he succeeded in getting the other trustees 
to vote to admit Miss Sarah Parke Morrison as a student in that 
institution. Miss Morrison .was the first woman graduate, receiv- 
ing her diploma in 1869. She now lives in Knightstown. Mr. 
Jenkinson was also instrumental in the purchase of the beautiful 
campus of Indiana University. .After his retirement from the duties 
of active life he resided in his beautiful home at Richmond until 
the time of his demise, Oct. 25, 191 1. He is survived by a widow, 
Airs. Xarcissa (Lewis) Jenkinson, whom he married at Williams- 
burg, in 1854. 

Henry Rayburn Robinson. — Among those to whom the thriv- 
ing little city of Richmond is indebted for its business and civic 
prestige is Henry Rayburn Robinson, a native son of the city and 
one of its most honored and progressive citizens. He was born in 
Richmond, Ind., Feb. 13, 1874, a representative of one of the ster- 
ling pioneer families of this favored section of the State, lie is a 
son of the late Henry E. and Emma (Brown) Robinson (see sketch 
of Henry E. Robinson). He was afforded the advantages of the 
excellent public schools of Richmond, including the high school, in 
which he graduated with the class of 1894, after which he became a 
student in the Alassachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, 
Mass., and soon afterward entered the establishment of Robinson 
& Company, at Richmond, which his grandfather had founded. He 
was literally reared in the business, as was also his brother, Wil- 
liam P. Robinson, the efficient secretary of the concern, and started 
in the shops as a workman, continuing so employed until the death 
of his grandfather, lie then successively filled the positions of 
foreman, assistant superintendent, and superintendent, until 1908, 
when he was made vice-president and superintendent of the com- 
pany. He has contributed his due share in making the enterprise 
a distinctive success. Air. Robinson is a man of much initiative 



622 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

power and progressive ideas, his business affairs are handled with 
discrimination and ability, and he has so ordered his course in all 
the relations of life as to maintain the confidence and good will of 
the people of his native county and all others with whom he has 
had business or social relations, lit is a member of the Commer- 
cial Club and of the Tourist Club of Richmond, president of the 
Richmond Lake and Park Company — a corporation organized to 
purchase and preserve 100 acres of land known as the Hawkins 
and Marmon Estates, situated in the river valley between Tenth 
street and (den Miller Park — and he is a communicant of St'. Paul's 
Protestant Episcopal Church, in which he lias officiated as super- 
intendent of the Sunday school for about twenty years. On July 
12, 1899, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Robinson to Miss 
Olive M. Kaminski, born near Steubenville, Ohio, a daughter of 
Mrs. Anna E. Kaminski, of Richmond. Mrs. Robinson is a grad- 
uate of Earlham College in the class of 189(1. Of the union of Mr. 
and Mrs Robinson have been born two sons — Charles K. and Fran- 
cis W. The family resides at 832 National Road. 

Henry E. Robinson, deceased, for many years prominent as a 
manufacturer, was bom in Richmond, Inch, Oct. 10, 1839. tie 
was a son of Francis \Y. and Susan IS. Robinson (see sketch of 
Francis W, Robinson). He received the educational training af- 
forded by the schools of his native city and remained at home 
until the breaking out of the Civil war. Then, when twenty-two 
years old, he enlisted as a private in the Fifty-seventh Indiana 
infantry. This regiment was recruited in the Fifth and Eleventh 
Congressional districts and was organized at Richmond, in Xo- 
' vember, 1861. It was mustered in, Nov. 18, and left the State 
Dec. 23, reporting to General Buell at Louisville, where it was 
assigned to the Sixth division, Army of the Ohio, and ordered 
to Bardstown, Ky. It moved to Lebanon, and on Feb. 12, 1862, 
to Munfordville,' and thence to Nashville. It started for Pitts- 
burg Landing, March 21, and was actively engaged at Shiloh. 
It participated in the siege of Corinth and moved from there to 
Northern Alabama, where it remained until Jul}', and was then 
ordered to Tennessee. It was on duty near Tullahoma and Mc- 
Minnville until September and then took an active part in the 
campaign against Bragg in Kentucky, being in the battle of 
Perryville, Mr. Robinson participated in all of the services of his 
regiment up until this time, but soon thereafter was forced to 
retire on account of illness, and his discharge from the service 
was received after his return home, lie recovered after a severe 
illness and then went to Indianapolis, where he became identi- 
fied with an express company. Later, he returned to Richmond 
and became a partner with his lather in the Robinson Machine 
Works. He was made vice-president of the company when it 
was incorporated, in 1 SS<), as Robinson & Company, and when 
his father died, in 1897, Mr. Robinson was chosen president, con- 
tinuing in that position until his death, Jan. 9, 1909. While liv- 
ing at Indianapolis, Mr. Robinson was happily married to Miss 
Emma Brown. Mrs. Robinson died as the result of a railway 



RIOGRAPH1CAI. ()2T, 

accident, near Hay View, Mich., where she was spending the 
summer months, Sept. 14, 1899. While alighting from a passen- 
ger train she stepped in front of another one, which she did not 
see, and the fatal accident caused deeply felt grief among a large 
circle of friends. She and her husband are buried at Crown Hill 
cemetery, in Indianapolis. Mr. Robinson was a leading manu- 
facturer of Richmond and was one of the most prominent busi- 
ness men in the community, having served for some time as 
president of the County Council. For many years he was identi- 
fied with St. Paul's Episcopal Church, lie was a congenial man, 
had a large circle of friends, and was recognized as one of the 
most systematic and thorough business men in the city. His 
interest in local affairs was always manifested and his time for 
private matters was not so valuable as to prevent him from de- 
voting a portion to the public welfare. He is survived by live 
children: Frank 1'.., a locating engineer in the West; Airs. Frank 
Vaughan, of Richmond; William P. Robinson, secretary of Rob- 
inson & Companx ; Henry Rayburn Robinson (see sketch); and 
Mrs. Harry Gennett, of Richmond. Mr. Robinson is also sur- 
vived by live sisters: Mrs. Emily Yeo, Mrs. S. E. Swayne, Mrs. 
George Barnes, and the Misses Elenora and Frances Robinson. 

Fielding Gaar was born in Richmond, on South Front street, 
now South Fourth street, Jan. 1, 1827. He was the youngest son 
of Jonas and Sarah (Watson) Gaar (see sketch of Gaar' Family, 
page 2~y). From the age of fifteen years he was actively con- 
nected with the old linn of A. Gaar & Company and afterwards 
with Gaar, Scott & Company until about twenty years before his 
death, which occurred at his residence, 206 North Fifteenth 
street, in Richmond, Nov. 19, 1900. He was a stockholder in the 
firm of Gaar, Scott cS: Company from the time of its organiza- 
tion. In November, 1805, he was married to Mary J. Gallagher. 
Their children are: Jonas, the eldest, who resides in Richmond; 
Charles, a machinist with Gaar, Scott & Company; Indiana, who 
married II. W. Gilbert, manager of collections for the firm of 
Gaar, Scott & Company; and Earl, who resides with his mother 
in Eos Angeles, Cal. 

William Dudley Foulke, lawyer, writer, journalist, and one 
of the leading citizens of the State of Indiana, was born at No. 
70, Rivington street, New York City, Now 20, J 848, a son of 
Thomas and Hannah (Shoemaker) Foulke. lie is a descendant 
of Edward Foulke, who emigrated from North "Wales in 1698 
and was among the colonists brought by William Penn to America, 
settling at Gwynodd, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. The 
ancestry of Edward Foulke was set forth in one of those long and 
luxuriant pedigrees so common in Welsh genealogies and after- 
ward formed the subject of a satire by Mr. Foulke, entitled "The 
Economical Acquisition of Royal Ancestry," which appeared in 
his "Protean Papers," published by G. P. Putnam's Sons, in 1903. 
Air. Foulke's father and grandfather (Joseph Foulke) were both 
ministers in the Society of Friends. His father, Thomas Foulke, 
was for a long time principal of Grammar School No. 45, their 



()24 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

the largest school in New York City, and to that school the hoy 
was sent for his education; but owing to ill health his attendance 
was intermittent, and his early education was acquired mostly at 
home. When his father afterwards became principal of Friends' 
Seminary at Rutherford Place, New York City, Mr. Foulke at- 
tended school there for some years, and then, after a few months' 
preparation under a private tutor, he entered Columbia College, 
in the fall of 1865, graduating in 1869, at the head of his class 
and delivering the Greek Salutatory. A year later he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in New York, and in 1871 graduated at Colum- 
bia College Law School, commencing the practice of the law in 
New York City, in partnership with Frank Molocsay. In Octo- 
ber, 1872, he was married to Mary Taylor Reeves, daughter of 
Mark E. and Caroline M. Reeves, of Richmond, fnd. He continued 
the practice of the law in New York until 1876, when he re- 
moved to Richmond and formed a partnership with Jesse P. Sid- 
dall, one of the solicitors of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis 
Railway Company, and he remained for fifteen years one of the 
attorneys of this company, as well as being engaged in general 
practice. In 1882 he was elected upon the Republican ticket as 
a member of the Indiana State Senate from Wayne county and 
seiwed four years. Luring his term he refused to support Mr. 
Blaine for the Presidency. He became interested in the reform 
of the civil service ami. introduced a bill to establish this reform 
in Indiana, but public opinion was not yet ripe for the matter 
and it failed by a close vote 4.0 pass the Senate. He subsequently 
became president of the Indiana Civil Service Reform Associa- 
tion and conducted a series of investigations into the manage- 
ment of the State Insane Hospital, which resulted in revealing 
many abuses, including fraudulent contracts and the ill treatment 
of patients, due to the spoils system under the partisan manage- 
ment of that institution. This investigation and the publicity 
given to it had considerable influence in the election of 18S6, as 
well as in the Presidential campaign of 1888, in which Benjamin 
Harrison was elected. In 1889-90, during Mr. Harrison's term, 
Mr. Foulke was the chairman of a special committee of the Na- 
tional Civil Service Reform League, consisting of Charles J. Bona- 
parte, Richard 11. Dana, Jr., Wayne MaeVeagh, and Sherman S. 
Rogers, which conducted a series of investigations into the con- 
dition of the Federal civil service, embracing the subjects of 
Congressional patronage, the administration of the Patent Office 
and Census Bureau, political changes in the Postoffice Department, 
removal of office-holders upon secret charges, and other matters, 
and severe strictures were made upon the administration of Presi- 
dent Harrison. It was while he was conducting this investiga- 
tion that a friendship began between Mr. Roosevelt, who was 
then Civil Service Commissioner, and Mr. Foulke, and which has 
continued uninterruptedly since that time. Mr. Foulke was also 
for many years president of the American W r oman Suffrage As- 
sociation, until its union with the National Woman Suffrage As- 
sociation, in 1890. In that year he retired from the generalprac- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 625 

tice of the law. In 1891 he was elected president of Swarthmore 
College, but was unable to accept the position, owing to the sud- 
den death of his brother-in-law, Arthur M. Reeves, which cast 
certain business responsibilities upon him and made a removal 
to the East impossible. Four years before this time he wrote 
"Slav or Saxon," a monograph, describing the growth of Rus- 
sian civilization and its rivalry to the civilization of English- 
speaking peoples. A second edition of this work, including an 
account of subsequent Russian aggressions, was published irt 
[898, and a third edition, subsequent to the war between China 
and Japan, was published in 1904 (G. I'. Putnam's Sons). In 
1899 he published in two volumes a biography of Oliver P. Morton, 
the war governor of Indiana (Bobbs-Merrill Co., of Indianapolis), 
which is in fact a history of Indiana during the period of the 
Civil war, as well as a record of the subsequent career of Mr. 
Morton in the United States Senate. He was acting chairman of 
the Congress on Sufi rage in the World's Congress Auxiliary of 
the Columbian Exposition in 1893, and in that year became presi- 
dent of the American Proportional Representation League. Mr. 
Foulke has devoted a considerable portion of his time to foreign 
travel in all the countries of Europe, in Cuba, Mexico, Yucatan, 
etc., and in 1900 published "Maya, a Story of Yucatan,'' being 
a romance of the period of the Spanish Conquest, the scene of 
which was laid in Uxmal and other places in that peninsula. Mr. 
Foulke has also taken an active part in every political campaign 
since 1876, and another book, issued by him in 1903, entitled 
"Protean Papers," is a collection of miscellaneous essays, the first 
one, "Spell-binders," enumerating the characteristic ami amusing 
scenes in the career of a political campaigner. Other articles de- 
scribe "Mountaineering in Mexico," "The Frailties of Literary 
Criticism," "The Disadvantages of a University Education," and 
other subjects. Mr. Foulke has also been an occasional contribu- 
tor to various magazines. When Mr. Roosevelt succeeded to the 
Presidency, in 1901, one of his first appointments was that of 
Mr. Foulke to the National Civil Service Commission, and as such 
he served until 1903, most of the time as the colleague of John 
R. Proctor and James R. Garfield. He resigned, owing to ill 
health, and has since devoted much of his time to travel in Italy, 
Germany, Greece, Russia, Scandinavia, France, Spain, etc. In 
1906 he wrote the first English translation of the "History of the 
Langobards, by Paul, the Deacon," with elaborate historical and 
critical notes. This work was issued by the Department of His- 
tory of the University of Pennsylvania. He has also been a con- 
tributor to the American Historical Magazine. In 1906, Earlham 
College, in his home city, conferred upon him the degree of Doc- 
tor of Laws. In November, 1910, he succeeded Charles J. Bona- 
parte as president of the National Municipal League, and in the 
same year wrote "The Quaker Boy," a tale of the outgoing gen- 
eration, as it appears chronicled in the autobiography of Robert 
Barclay Dillingham, and which appeared a year later under the' 
title, "Dorothy Day" (Cosmopolitan Press, 191 1). In the same 



(>2h MKMOlKS 111' - WAYNE COUNTY 

year, 191 1, "Maya," a lyrical drama, was issued by the same 
Press, being a dramatization of Mr. Foulke's romance of the same 
title. He has also delivered numerous addresses on political and 
sociological subjects in various parts of the country. In 191 1 he 
was re-elected President of the National Municipal League. In 
politics lie is a progressive Republican. He has been, since June, 
1909, one of the editors, as well as the principal proprietor, of the 
"Evening Item," an independent newspaper, published in Rich- 
mond. At an earlier period, in 1883, he was for a short time one 
of the editors of the "Palladium," another Richmond paper. 

John and Elizabeth (Piatt) Erwin. — The simple life was the 
universal type of life in Richmond 100 years ago, and it seems fit- 
ting to pay tribute to the generous helpfulness and rugged in- 
tegrity of the early settlers, who left their far-away homes in 
the East and braved the hardships of the overland journey which 
brought them to the new country waiting to be occupied and 
made to blossom and yield its treasures to the diligent and in- 
telligent laborers. The strength of every government — munici- 
pal, State or National — lies in the great body of men and women 
whose struggles, failures, and successes never come to the notice 
of the general public. Without their staunch loyalty great lead- 
ers would be powerless. John and Elizabeth Erwin belonged to 
that body of men and women who agree with Whittier in the 
belief that "Love of God and neighbor should be an equal-handed 
labor," and their quiet lives were so lived that they la\ down to 
their final rest "like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
about him and lies down to rest, undisturbed by thoughts of 
wrongs." They came with their eight children — except the eldest 
daughter, Mary Ann Frazer, — from Newport, Del., to Richmond, 
Ind., in 1828. One child, Maria, died at the age of nine years and 
was buried at the old home, and one son, William, was born in 
the West. Some incidents of the journey will illustrate the 
changes that have taken place in the means of transportation, 
from a wagon for the baggage and a "Dearborn" for the accom- 
modation of the family, to the baggage cars and Pullman sleep- 
ers of to-day. They left Newport at an early hour, June 15, 1828, 
and dined at Rock Meeting House, where they bade farewell to 
the relatives who had accompanied them thus far — a sadder part- 
ing than we of to-day can realize when the distance can be com- 
fortably covered in less than twenty-four hours. They usually 
traveled from 5 or f> o'clock in the morning until 7 or 8 o'clock 
in the evening, with stops for meals, repairs to the wagon, the 
purchase of supplies, rest for horses, etc. They struck the turn- 
pike twenty-three and one-half miles from Baltimore, at a small 
village called Rush. Before reaching Baltimore the)' paid $175 
for crossing a bridge at Fort Deposit, and fifty cents, sixty-two 
and one-half cents, and thirty-one and one-fourth cents at the 
three toll gates. The land was well cultivated to St. Petersburg, 
at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, where they stopped 
for the night, passing the villages of Cookstown, Lisbon, Poplar 
Springs, Ridgeville, New Market, and Frederick, the last three 



UIOGRAl'lJ IC 



boasting the possessions of postoffices. Beyond the first summit 
lay an elegant valley and the village of Middletown. When they 
reached the summit of the second ridge repairs to the wheels 
became necessary. Four miles beyond Boonsville the faithful dogs 
were missed and the eldest son returned for them, at the cost of 
an extra walk of mure than sixteen miles before he rejoined 
Thomas Boys and a black boy, "Jacob," who waited for him while 
the rest of the company went on to Hagerstown, seventy miles 
from Baltimore. Thomas Boys was a cobbler who accompanied 
the family and made shoes for the earl)- residents of Richmond 
at their homes. The black boy, "Jake," as he was familiarly 
known, was a slave in Delaware and had importuned Mr. Erwin 
to buy him and bring him west with him. Mr. Erwin was op- 
posed to slavery, and could not have held him in servitude in 
Indiana in any event, but finally paid the price of his freedom, 
in return for which "Jake" rendered faithful and willing service, 
later becoming a useful citizen as a barber. The attention of the 
oldest son, John W. Erwin, was attracted by the many bridges, 
of two, three, or four arches, in some instances. It is interesting 
to note that on his arrival at Richmond he diligently applied 
himself to the study of astronomy, navigation, surveying, and 
kindred subjects, anil became very proficient in surveying, a call- 
ing in which in after years he gained much prominence and was 
largely instrumental in developing the resources and industries 
of the western country. He was employed in constructing the 
first turnpike west of the mountains, and with his brother-in-law, 
John Frazer, who came west later, assisted in building all the 
old covered bridges on the National Road. Their names, with 
others, were to be seen on the abutment of the old Main Street 
bridge, crossing Whitewater. John W. Erwin was interested 
throughout his long life in all works of a public character, and 
this interest, no doubt, was aroused by the experiences of this 
long journey, which terminated July 12, Saturday, at 1 o'clock, 
p. m., at Richmond, Ind., where the family stopped at Mr. Suther- 
land's hotel, remaining until Tuesday, when they rented a house 
of Patrick Justice at $4 per month, putting the horses to pasture 
the next day, July 16. One of these horses would never work 
double again. Most of the stops for the night had been at way- 
side inns and the expense ranged from twenty-live cents to $i.87/ , 2, 
totalling about $28. Supplies had been difficult to procure at 
times, particularly in the "plentiful State" of Ohio, where they 
"nearly starved," says the diary of one of the boys. Bread by 
the loaf had varied from '(w^ cents to twelve and one-half cents; 
sugar, ten to fourteen cents per pound; butter, six and one-fourth 
to ten cents; beef, hard to ij 
per pound ; ham, eight ecu 
sixty-two and one-half cent 
plies was about $25. Nine'1 
varying from thirty-one an< 
one-half cents, totalling $; 



:t at 


two a 


nd oiie-ha 


If to f( 


mr cents 


; a 1 


)i mud 


; one-half 


pi HUK 


1 of tea. 


. Tl 


le tot 


al expend 


it ure s 


for sup- 


:en t 


oll-gal 


es were ] 


Kissed 


at rates 


one- 


fourtl 


1 cents to 


sixty- 


two and 


M 1 ''-- 


Toll 


bridges, 


varying from 


ach, 


cost 


them $3.7 


'4. ami 


1 ferries, 



628 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

$2.o6M. They began the ascent of the Allegheny range of moun- 
tains, June 24, making only fifteen miles that day on account of 
constantly ascending or descending. They reached the foot of the 
last mountain, Laurel Hill, June 27, when they encountered the 
first rain and the first necessity for heavy repairs to the wagon 
wheels- -new spokes and tires. The growth of Norwich, Ohio, 
seemed phenomenal to them as they passed, July 4, 1828, its forty 
buildings, including four or five taverns, having been built since 
Aug. 13, 1827, with seven or eight brick houses to be erected 
that summer. Circleville, with its circular streets and interesting 
mounds, was described. Xenia and Dayton were "considerable 
villages," the latter "well laid out" and having an elegant saw 
■mill near and three large canal boats in process of construction. 
The woods on the mountains abounded with panthers, bears, 
wolves, deer, etc. The inhabitants, principally Dutch and Irish, 
lived in poorly constructed log cabins. Just before reaching 
Wheeling they passed the monument erected by Moses and Lydia 
Shepherd to Henry Clay, in 1820. At Morristown they stopped 
at Nathan Shepherd's inn, with the sign of "equestrian statue of 
Gen. Andrew Jackson." The turnpike was finished only to 
Zanesville and the)- had to travel the "old route." It was ex- 
pected that 100 miles of the National Pike to Cincinnati would 
be completed that year, which the writer said would be "superb." 
It was in this way that the early settlers came west, where mu- 
tual helpfulness — the spirit of brotherly kindness — was the watch- 
word, and log-rollings, barn-raisings, quiltings, apple-pearings, and 
corn-huskings were the natural expressions of it, born of com- 
mon needs. John Erwin was a farmer and spent the remainder 
of his life in this vicinity, dying in 1841). His wife died in 1846. 
His secund son, George W., was associated in later life with his 
brother, John, in a paper mill at Middletown, Ohio. Samuel, Ed- 
win, and William for many years lived on farms southeast of 
Richmond, the first named residing there until his death. Ed- 
win and William later in life moved to Missouri. Elizabeth Erwin 
married Aaron Shute and lived on a farm on the State line. Lydia 
married Alexander Stokes and lived in and near Richmond to 
an advanced age, having been a widow many years. Alice P. 
married Dr. William B, Smith, for many years a successful phys- 
ician in Richmond. His wife survived him, spending her last 
years in Indianapolis, Ind. Susan B. Erwin married Erancis W. 
Robinson, who established the Robinson Machine Works, pass- 
ing away in 1895, her husband surviving her two years. Maria 
died in youth before the)' left Delaware. The survivors of this 
family are as follows: Erank Erwin Brandt, grandson of John 
W. Erwin, and two children reside in Aurora, 111. Elizabeth 
Strobridge, daughter of George W. Erwin, and one daughter, 
formerly of Cincinnati, are now in North Carolina with several 
other children and great-grandchildren. Three grandchildren — 

Mrs. Judge Martin of Bedford, Ind., Mrs. Ella , and Charles 

Dougherty, an attorney of Kansas City, Mix — survive Ma>ry Ann 
Frazer, Three grandchildren of Elizabeth (Erwin) Shute — 



Mi/;il#Mli (VSi-hbU-.r) \Htlhi-.y, (iulrutU: .M/iile, and Inez Ifodgin - 
survive; as do a/so two great-grandchildren, One daughter- 
Mrs. Margarcl D Williams and seven grandchildren Harry I). 
Williams of Paytona, Ma., I'anl, of Columbus, Ohio, Charles, 
living in VVesl Virginia, F>anor Sniilli, of Indianapolis, William 
( I,;,,, in oi liidi.in.i|ifiJi . I'. ml ' liapin, i.l fill Imigh, I'.. . and Maiy 

Kciliii. i.l lndiana|.nlis and sevcial focal [oainl. Inlilu- vivi- 

Mice I'. Sniilli. Tumi d.nmlilu . Man Mmlc ami ! -,il ah Mnl ■ ■■■. 
—one grandchild Mrs. Mvra Necdhain and dailghlei survive 
Lydia E. Stokes. The living descendants of Susan Li. Robin- 
son: Children— Emily Piatt Yeo, Elizabeth F. Barnes, Eleonora 
H. and Frances M. Robinson, and Airs. S. E. Swayne; grand- 
children— H. M. Yep, Willard F. Yeo, Frank B., William Platte, 
ami II. R. Robinson, Mrs. Daisy T. Vaughan, Mrs. Grace Gen- 
nett, E. Yarrington Barries, and Juliet R. Swayne; and there are 
fifteen great-grandchildren. Of William P. Erwin one son, Ed- 
win 1'. Erwin and family, are the only descendants. 

Edward W. Craighead, a leading business man of the city of 
Richmond and ex-president of the Electrical Contractors' Asso- 
ciation oi the State of Indiana, was bom in Wooster, Wayne 
county, Ohio, May I, 1863. Lis parents were William Johnston 
and Mary Ann (McClure) Craighead, the former born in Penn- 
sylvania, March 7, 1833, and died Aug. 19, 1864, and the latter 
in Wooster, Ohio, and died in the same place in 1900. They were 
married Oct. 17, 1855. The father represented the sixth genera- 
tion of the Craighead family in this, country. The first of the 
family name to come to America was Rev. Thomas Craighead, 
a son of Rev. Robert Craighead, who was a native of Scotland 
and who removed to Ireland, where he was. settled as pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church of Dono.ughmore, in 1657-58, in which 
place he labored thirty years. lie was subsequently a minister 
at Londonderry, at the time the gates of that city were closed 
against the Papal forces of James II, whose purpose it was to 
massacre the Protestants. Reverend Craighead made his escape 
the second day of the siege that followed and made his way to 
Glasgow, Scotland; but afterward returned to Ireland and died 
in Londonderry, in 171 J. J lis son Thomas was educated in Scot- 
land as a physician and married the daughter of a Scotch laird. 
After practicing medicine for a time he abandoned that profes- 
sion, studied theology, and was a pastor several years in Ireland, 
principally at Donegal. In consequence, however, of the oppres- 
sions endured by the Presbyterians of that country and indicted 
by the government and the established church, and past experi- 
ence giving them little hope of any permanent relief, large num- 
bers of the people determined to emigrate to America. Among 
these emigrants was Thomas Craighead, who came to New Eng- 
land in 1715, accompanied by Rev. William Holmes, who was 
married to Reverend Craighead's sister, Catherine. Reverend 
Holmes settled at Martha's Vineyard and is buried with his wife 
at Chilmark. Their eldest son, Robert, was a sea captain, resided, 
in Boston, and married Mary, a sister of Benjamin Franklin. The 



63O MEMOIRS OF WAYXK COUNTY 

first public mention made of Thomas Craighead in this country 
is by Cotton Mather, who speaks of him as preaching at Free- 
town, which was about forty miles south of Boston, and urges 
the people to do all in their power to have him settle among 
them. The efforts made for his settlement in Freetown were un- 
successful, for we find a notice in President Stiles' papers of his 
coming "to the Jerseys" in the spring of 1723. On Jan. 28, 1724, 
he became a member of New Castle Presbytery, which at that 
period included portions of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Dela- 
ware. He received a call from White Clay Creek, Del., in Feb- 
ruary of the same year, and accepted it. lie was installed Sept. 
22, 1724, and was there seven years, lie removed to Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1733, and on Sept. 3 of the same year 
united with Donegal Presbytery, at which time a call was placed 
in his hands from the church at Pequea. This he accepted and 
was installed as pastor, Oct. 31, Rev. Mr. Anderson presiding. 
He died while pastor of the church at Newville, in April, 1739. 
The great-grandson of Rev. Thomas Craighead was James ( id- 
son Craighead, who married Margaret Patterson and became the 
father of John Craighead, the grandfather of Edward \V. John 
Craighead was born May 6, 1S02, in Pennsylvania, and on Feb. 
10, 1831, was married to Alesanna Johnston, of Cumberland 
county, that State. His wife died Nov. 2, 1856, and he passed 
away March io, 1864. They were the parents of William John- 
ston Craighead, the father 'of Edward W. William J. Craig- 
head spent the early years of his life on a farm with his parents 
near Mansfield, Ohio. Then for a time he conducted a tin and 
coppersmith shop in Wooster, Ohio, and finally purchased 640 
acres of land which had been used by a slave-holder in Missouri, 
near St. Louis. Lie went there to prepare the place for cultiva- 
tion, and while thus engaged was stricken with illness and died, 
his remains being brought to Wooster, Ohio, for burial. The 
land in Missouri was afterwards sold. Of the union of William 
J. Craighead and wife were born three children: Alice, the wife 
of F. S. Kuhn, of Fast End, Pittsburg, Pa.; Lee Durbin. of Wil- 
kinsburg, also a suburb of Pittsburg; and Edward W. The latter 
received his education in the public schools of Wooster, Ohio. 
After the completion of his schooling he learned the tinner's trade 
with an uncle, working at that business about three years. He 
then learned the plumbing and heating' trade in Wooster, after 
which he worked at that occupation in Cleveland and Chicago un- 
til twenty-one years of age. In 1884 he engaged in the plumbing 
business at Wooster, in partnership with another uncle, the firm 
being known as McClure & Craighead, and this association con- 
tinued about six years. Mr. Craighead then disposed of his in- 
terest in the business to his partner and moved to Piqua, Ohio, 
where he worked for a Mr. Lenox one year, having charge of the 
hitter's plumbing work in that place. In 1802 he came to Rich- 
mond and accepted the position of foreman for F. W. Curtis, hav- 
ing charge of the plumbing and heating for that gentleman six 
years. In 1899 Mr. Craighead and James S. Zoller purchased the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 63I 

business of Mr. Curtis and organized the firm of Zoller & Craig- 
head. For seven years the place of business was located at 1127 
Main street, and then it was moved to 910 Main street, where 
it is now located. In February, 1907, Mr. Craighead purchased 
the interest of Mr. Zoller in the business and organized a stock 
company, with a capital stock of $15,000, under the name of 
Craighead Plumbing & Flectric- Company, wholesale and retail 
dealers in plumbing, heating and electrical goods, manufacturers 
of chandeliers, and contractors for plumbing, hot water and steam 
heating and all kinds of electrical construction. This company 
put the heating plants in the Wayne county court house, the Hit- 
tie Block, and the Rend Memorial Hospital, and also did the 
plumbing, heating and wiring in the last named building. It also 
did the plumbing and heating in the Wernle Orphans' Home, and 
the heating and wiring in the new Second National Dank build- 
ing, recently constructed. Among other work recently completed 
is the remodeling of the plumbing, heating and wiring of the 
Westcott Hotel, and the wiring of the new high school building 
and putting in the electrical fixtures, call bells, and automatic 
clock system. Other works that may be mentioned are the heat- 
ing plants of the Jones Hardware Company; Pogue, Miller & Co.; 
the George H. Knollenberg Company, and the Wayne Flats; also 
the plumbing, heating and wiring in the new residences of Mrs. 
Helen M. Gaar and Howard Campbell; the plumbing in the new 
Richmond I'nderwear Company building on North Tenth street; 
the wiring and plumbing in the residence of James M. Carr; 
the plumbing and heating in the residence of Henry Gennett ; the 
plumbing in the office of Gaar, Scott & Co.; plumbing, heating and 
wiring in the New Murray Theatre; the plumbing in the new resi- 
dence of Dr. Dougan ; the plumbing and heating in the F.Iks' 
Club House; the wiring of the Y. M. C. A. building; and the 
plumbing, heating and wiring of the two new Hat buildings erected 
by Jonas Gaar at North Fifteenth and A streets. The company 
has also done a great deal of work outside of Richmond, chang- 
ing and remodeling the heating plant in the Greensburg High 
School building; putting in new heating plants in the Union 
county court house and jail; wiring and heating the Elks' build- 
ing at Greensburg, Ind. ; installing the plumbing equipment in the 
new high school building at Wichita, Kan.; and many other con- 
tracts that might be mentioned. Mr. Craighead has succeeded in 
developing a large business by his careful attention and honest 
dealings with his patrons, the quality of his work being his best 
advertisement. He served as a director of the Commercial Club 
in Richmond five years, was a director of the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation a number of years, and served as president of the Electri- 
cal Contractors' Association of the State of Indiana during the 
year 1908. lie is a member of the Commercial Club, the Young 
Men's Business Club, the National Plumbers' Association, and 
the Electrical Contractors' Association. Fraternally he has mem- 
bership in Webb Masonic Podge; Tola Podge, Knights of 
Pythias, and the Elks. On June 10, 1884, he was united in mar- 



632 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

riage with Miss Margaret Jeffries, at Piqua, Ohio. She is a 
daughter of Mr. ami Mrs. George W. Jeffries, of Piqua, where 
she was horn ami educated. Mr. and Mrs. Craighead have been 
blessed by the birth of three sons: George Walter has charge 
of the manufacturing of chandeliers and is assistant manager of 
his father's business; Norman Jeffries has charge of the electrical 
work in the employ of the company; and bonis Ohliger is stock- 
man, having charge of all incoming and outgoing materials. 

James C. Taylor, a prominent farmer and citizen of Dalton 
township, is a native of Wayne count)', born in Daltou township, 
Feb. 18, 18O7. His parents — Henry and Emma (Pierce) Taylor, 
were born in Indiana, the father in Henry county. Henry Tay- 
lor is a son of James Taylor, born in Guilford county, North 
Carolina, and brought to Indiana when about fourteen years old 
by his parents. Emma (Pierce) Taylor died in i860, and of her 
marriage with Henry Taylor was horn a son, James C. James G. 
Taylor was thus orphaned by the death of his mother when 
eighteen months old and was reared by his grandfather, James 
Taylor, a prominent farmer of Henry county. He received his 
ea'iy education in the schools of that county and remained with 
his grandfather until his majority. lie then began farming for 
himself and followed that occupation eight years, at the end of 
which time he engaged in the general mercantile business at 
Dalton, following that line of endeavor twelve years, and in 1908 
came to the farm where he resides, located in the southwest quar- 
ter of section 28, about one and one-half miles from the village 
of Dalton. In politics Mr. Taylor is a Republican and he held 
the office of postmaster at Dalton two years and until the office 
was discontinued on account of the rnral free delivery. In 1909 
he was elected township trustee. He was married in Dalton 
township, Jan. 23, 1889, to Miss Mary L. Beeson, daughter of 
Benjamin and Olinda (Lamb) Beeson, natives of Dalton township, 
where the father became one of the largest land-owners in Wayne 
county, having owned as many as 1,100 acres at one time. Mrs. 
Taylor was born in Dalton township, Jan. 23, 1867, and received 
her early education in the district schools. To Mr. and Mrs. Tay- 
lor have been born six children: Benjamin W. married Sylvia 
Dennis and is a farmer in Dalton township; Ruth graduated at 
the Mooreland High School with the class of 1911 and resides at 
the parental home; and the others are Howard, Harriet, Richard, 
and Olinda. Mrs. Taylor is the second in order of birth of the 
children of her parents, the others being Isaac F., of Randolph 
county, who married Catherine Huffman and they have four child- 
ren — Grace, Benjamin P., Marguerite, and Donald — and Edward O. 
and Frederick L., twins, residing in Randolph count)'; the former 
married Lena Waltz and they have two children — George and 
Mary L. ; and the latter married Laura Davis and the)' have seven 
children— Herbert, Bernard, Charles, Harold, Lowell, Robert, and 
James. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
bellows, Dalton Lodge, No. 529, and his religious faith is ex- 
pressed in the Friends' church. He is an earnest believer in 



BIOGRAPHICAL 633 

education and has devoted a great deal of time in this line to the 
best interest of the children of Dalton. He also takes a great 
deal of interest in stock-raising and agriculture. 

Joseph Clevenger, who is one of the successful farmers and 
stock-raisers of Washington township, where he owns a well im- 
proved homestead of about 300 acres, but is living retired in Mil- 
ton, was born in Abington township, Wayne county, Indiana, Jan. 
14, 1847, a son (lt * Samuel and R-titli (Spahr - ) Clevenger, the former 
born in Darke county, Ohio, March 10, 1810, and the latter in 
Virginia, |an. 5, i8i_\ The paternal grandfather was Daniel 
Clevenger, who came from Ohio to Wayne county in 1810 and 
located in Abington township and purchased land, which he 
cleared and upon which he resided until his death. He became 
the father of seven children, all of whom are deceased — Samuel, 
Polly, Cynthia, Susan, Lucinda, Sarah, and Maria. Samuel Clev- 
enger was a boy at the time of his parents' immigration to Wayne 
count v, and as before stated the family look up its abode in 
Abington township, where he was reared to maturity and received 
a common-school education. Tie remained with his father until 
married, when he inherited a farm of [60 acres, which he cleared 
and farmed until his death, April 28, l88l. lie was a Democrat in 
his political proclivities and both he and his wife were com- 
municants of the Methodist Episcopal church. The) were married 
about 1833 and became the parents of ten children: Rebecca, 
Susan, and Daniel are deceased; Sabra is the wife of Emanuel 
Leib, of Liberty, Ind.; Mary is the widow of David- Reigel and 
resides at Brownsville, Ind.; Samuel resides in Abington town- 
ship; Joseph is the next in order of birth; Nancy is the wife of 
William Quinn, of Cartersburg, Inch; Thomas resides at Center- 
ville, Ind.; and Francis is a resident of Abington township. Joseph 
Clevenger was reared in Wayne count)' and his earl)- educational 
privileges were those afforded by the district schools of Abing- 
ton township, lie continued to assist his father in his farming 
operations until the age of twenty-one years, after which lie 
rented a farm three years, lie then purchased eighty acres in 
Washington township, afterward adding to it until he had about 
300 acres, and he was most successful in his operations as a gen- 
eral agriculturist and as a breeder of horses, cattle, etc. In 1004 
he retired from the active management of his farm and, in 1906, 
removed to Milton, where he has since resided, and he is a stock- 
holder in the Hank of Milton. His political allegiance is given 
to the Democratic party and he and his wife hold membership in 
Doddridge Chapel of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
faith he was reared. On Dec. 28, 1870, Mr. Clevenger was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary J. Jones, daughter of Levi M. and Ma- 
tilda T. (Brown) Jones, of Centerville, Ind., where she was reared 
and educated. Mr. Jones was born in Centerville, Ind., April 4, 
1823, and his wife in Delaware count)-, Indiana, Sept. 25, 1829. 
The father was a brick-molder at Centerville several years and 
then followed farming in Washington township until his death, 
May 13, 1876. He and his good wife were married fune 15, 1851, 



634 MEMOIRS OE WAYNE COUNTY 

and became the parents of five children: Celia Ann, deceased; 
Mrs. Clevenger, who was born Jan. 10, 1853; Ella is the widow 
of Alford Small and resides at Klwood, Ind. ; Edward P. is a 
resident of Vancouver, Wash., and Morris Levi is deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clevenger have a son, Daniel Oran, who resides in Wash- 
ington township. 

Silas W. Clark, a successful farmer and prominent citizen of 
Washington township, was born in Madison comity, Indiana, Sept. 
6, 1845. His father, Thomas G. Clark, was born in Virginia and 
in that State received his education. He was married to Miss 
Cynthia Ann Lower and of this union four children were born, 
three of whom survive, the eldest, Alfred, being deceased. Silas 
\Y. is the second in order of birth, Joseph resides in Kansas City, 
and Frank is a resident of North Baltimore, Ohio. The father 
came west and located in Washington township, where he taught 
school a number of years. Later he engaged in agricultural pur 
suits in Madison counts', Indiana, but afterward returned to Wash- 
ington township and there his death occurred July 9, 1869, his 
wife surviving until August, 1908, when she passed away at North 
Baltimore, Ohio. The father was a Democrat in politics and while 
living in Madison county served as a member of the State legis- 
lature and also as county surveyor one term. Silas W. Clark re 
ceived all his educational training in the public schools of Madi- 
son count)' and at an early age began working on his father's 
farm. In 18C9 he purchased the old homestead in Washington 
township, the same consisting of 162 acres, and has since added 
forty-four acres, where he lives, and has erected the buildings 
thereon. Me devotes his attention to stock-raising and general 
farming. In the matter of politics Mr. Clark is aligned with the 
Democratic party, but has never been an aspirant for public office 
of any nature. On April 21, 1869, he was married to Miss Laura 
M. Hurst, daughter of William Durst. The first wife died May 
13, 1905, and in August, 1908, Mr. Clark was married to Mrs. 
Lilly (Francis) Alexander, of Cambridge City. 

Monroe M. Bertsch was born in Washington township, Wayne 
count)', Indiana, Oct. 30, 1883. His father, David Bertsch, is 
one of the prominent citizens of Wayne county and is very in- 
fluential in shaping affairs, his ripe judgment and keen intellectual 
powers making him a leader among men. He was born March 
23, 1852, in Butler count)', Ohio, and was quite young when 
brought by his father, Reuben Bertsch, to Washington township, 
in the schools of which he managed to secure a good education, 
which has been useful to him in his busy and honorable career, 
lie worked on his father's farm until twenty-five years of age and 
then rented a farm in Washington township, occupying the same 
five years. He then purchased a farm of his own and conducted 
it sixteen years, until 1894, when he removed to East German- 
town and purchased twenty-four acres of land, where he con- 
tinues his allegiance to agricultural pursuits. On Jan. 16, 1878, he 
was married to Miss Mary E. Worl, who became the mistress of 
his home and whose devotion to his interests throughout their 



BIOGRAPHICAL (>35 

wedded life has been incessant. Mr. Bertsch has always been a 
Democrat. To him and his good wife were born three children, 
one of whom, Geneva, is deceased; Monroe M. is the first in order 
of birth, and Ida, the youngest, resides at home with her parents. 
Monroe M. Bertsch grew to manhood in his native county and 
at the district schools of Washington township, and later in East 
Germantown and in the Cambridge City High School, received a 
substantial education. He then began working in the National 
Drill Works at Cambridge City, where he was employed about 
fourteen months, and then rented the old homestead in Wash- 
ington township, which he occupied until the fall of 191 1, en- 
gaged in general farming. On Oct. 14, 1906, Mr. Bertsch was 
married to Miss Pearl Arrna Rothermel, daughter of George P. 
and Anna (Hess) Rothermel, of Milton, and of this union was 
born a daughter. Irma, Jan. 29, 1909. Politically Mr. Bertsch is 
a Democrat, and socially he is a member of the Re 1 Men and of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Germantown. 

Frederick L. Davis, a successful farmer and stock-raiser of 
Center township, was born in Delaware county, Indiana, Dec. 4, 
1867. He is a sun of Harmon and Martha (Harris) Davis, natives 
of Wayne county, where the father was born in July, 1842, in 
Clay township, and the mother in June, 1845, m New Garden town- 
ship. In early life the father removed to Delaware county, where 
he purchased a farm and remained until 1875, when he returned to 
Wayne county. He then located north of Green's Fork, where 
he farmed for a time and then moved to Kalkaskia count}', Michi- 
gan, where he followed agricultural pursuits three years. Again 
returning to Wayne count)-, he lived for a time at Green's Fork 
and then farmed four years in Preble count)-, Ohio. He then 
came back to Wayne county and rented a farm two years, after 
which he went to Delaware county and purchased a one-third in- 
terest in the McGowan hoop factory. Four years later he sold 
this interest and returned to Green's Fork, where he is now the 
rural mail carrier on Route No. 21. His wife died Sept. 22, 1890. 
In politics the senior Davis is a Republican, but has never as- 
pired to hold public office. Frederick L. Davis had seven brothers 
and sisters, their names being here set forth: Emma and James 
are deceased; William B. resides in Flmhurst, Cab; and Myrtle, 
Clara P., Morton, and Stella are deceased. Frederick L. Davis 
was educated in the schools at Green's Fork, Wayne county. lie 
began his independent career by working for an uncle, Isaac Davis, 
west of Green's Fork in Clay township, with whom he remained 
one year, and then conducted a rented farm north of Greer's Fork 
a year, after which he joined his father in the hoop factory in 
Delaware county, in which he was engaged about a year. Then, 
after a six months' sojourn in Muncie, Ind., he came to Milton, 
where he farmed about one year, and then followed the same pur- 
suit in Jackson township five years, after which he returned to 
Washington tounship and conducted Joshua Lamntt's farm three 
years. He then rented the Morgan McCoy farm four years, after 
which he purchased eighty-two acres of William ! lartman. upon 



636 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

which he erected a dwelling house and there is engaged in general 
farming. Mr. Davis devotes all his energies to his farm work, in 
which line he has attained success. Socially he is a member of the 
Red Men at Cambridge City and of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Centerville. In politics he is a Republican in all na- 
tional affairs, hut locally is independent. Never an aspirant for 
any office, he has served his county as an elector only, feeling 
that if his ballot has been properly cast according to his best 
judgment and conscience his duty is well done. In August, }8<)0, 
Mr. Davis was united in the bonds of wedlock with Josephine 
Hunt, who was horn in Jackson township, ller father, Edward 
Hunt, was horn in Tennessee and was a farmer in Jackson town- 
ship, lie served as a soldier in the Civil war two and one-half 
years, and then returned to Wayne county and followed farming 
until his death. The mother, Margaret (Bright) Hum, is also 
deceased, and to them were born seven children: Martha and 
Ella, deceased; William, of East Germantown ; Caldona, the wife 
of Malon Gathers, of Jackson township; Matilda, the wife of Mon- 
roe Smith, of Washington township; Josephine, the wife of Mr 
Davis; and Edward, of Milton, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Havis have 
three children — Mabel, Ernest, and Yergie. 

William S. Miller merits recognition in this compilation by 
reason of his standing as one of the successful representatives of 
the agricultural industry in this count}', as well as for the reason 
that he is a citizen of sterling worth and one wdio enjoys uni 
form popularity in the community which has been his home dur- 
ing the major portion of his life. Mr. Miller is a native of Wayne 
county, born one-half mile west of Boston, in Boston township, 
April 12, i868_ a son of John W. and Cynthia Ann (Sheffer) Miller, 
born in Boston township. The paternal grandfather was William 
Miller and both families were early founded in Wayne county, 
which was the generous and beneficent cradle of much of the 
State history. John W. Miller was a farmer by occupation and 
had a well improved farm in Boston township, where he maintained 
his home until his death, Feb. 2, 1909. llib cherished and devoted 
wife survives and is living in Boston township. They became 
the parents of five children: Etta, deceased; Charles C, of Bos- 
ton township; William S. ; Anna, wife of Charles Y. Miller, of 
Richmond ; and Yergie, wife of Isaac Moore, of Boston township. 
John W. Miller was a man of sterling character and upon the 
record of bib long career as one of the world's noble army of 
workers there rests no blemish. His life was one of consecutive 
industry and he gained success through his own well-directed 
efforts. He was well known throughout Wayne county and long 
held prestige in this section. He was a Democrat in his political 
proclivities and was many years a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which his wife also is a devoted member. Wil- 
liam S. Miller secured his early educational training in the district 
schools of Boston township and from his boyhood days contrib- 
uted his quota to the work of the home farm, increasing his 
services as his ability and physical powers justified. Upon leav- 



BIOGRAPHICAL O 37 

ing the parental home, at the age of twenty-three years, he 
rented a farm in Center township, east of Centerville, where he 
remained about four years. He then farmed the home place four 
years, after which he removed to Brownsville township, Union 
county, where he purchased a farm and resided four years, lie 
then sold that place and, in March, 1905, purchased the place 
where he resides and which is maintained under a high state of 
cultivation and equipped with excellent improvements, including 
a substantial residence and good hams, all of which were built 
or remodeled by him. In politics he is a Democral and supports 
the measures and candidates approved by that organization, lie is 
one of the popular citizens of his township, where his circle of 
friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances. Mr. Miller has 
been twice married. On Feb. 14, [891, he wedded Miss Edna Dru- 
ley, horn and reared in this county, a daughter of John L. Drnley. 
Mrs. Miller was summoned to the life eternal March 17. 1894. 
( )n Sept. 6, 1900, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
Parks, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Druley) Parks, of Boston town- 
ship, and of this union have been born two children— Elmer P., born 
in Union county. Sept. 12, 1901, and John \V., born in Boston town- 
ship, Nov. 10, [906 — both of whom reside at the parental home, 
which is a center of gracious hospitality and a favored resort- of 
the large circle of friends whom Mr. and Mrs. Miller have gathered 
to them. 

Allen Family. — Among the substantial citizens of Wayne coun- 
ty are to be numbered the members of the Allen family, of 1 lagers- 
town, the first American ancestor of whom came from Ireland. The 
son of this early immigrant was Hugh Allen, Sr., who is buried in 
the Baptist cemetery at Salem in an unmarked grave. The next in 
line of descent, Hugh Allen, Jr., and his wife, Polly, were pioneer 
residents of Wayne county, coming here about the year 1822. Their 
offspring were Elizabeth, Jacob, John, Sarah, Mason, Jeremiah, 
Mary Ann, Caroline, Malimla, and Thomas L., all of whom are 
deceased with the exception of Thomas L., who resided in Indiana- 
polis. Hugh Allen, Jr., lived for a time in Kentucky, from whence 
lie moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and came from there to 
Indiana, settling near 1 lagcrslow 11 on what is known as the "Old 
Allen Homestead." Jacob Allen, eldest son of Hugh, Jr., and Polly 
Allen, came to Wayne county with his parents and was educated 
in Jefferson township. He was a farmer by occupation, and to him 
and his wife, Martha, were born four children — Dr. John II., Lewis 
C, Caroline, and Thomas 1! — all of whom are deceased but Thomas 
B. (of whom see sketch for further data concerning the Allen fam- 
ily)". Lewis C. Allen, second son of Jacob and Martha Allen, was 
born Sept. 19, 1847. He lived a life full of kindness to his neighbors 
and friends. He practiced charity toward all who were needy, on 
the theory that he had better bestow upon ninety-nine that were 
unworthy than to refuse chanty to oik that was really in need. He 
was a devout member of the Primitive Baptist church, and at his 
home church and neighboring churches was a regular attendant. Qn 
Feb, 19, 1874, he was married to Sarah E. Ice, born June 13, 1847, 



638 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

a daughter and youngest child of Jesse and Sarah (Hickman) Ice, 
and the place of her nativity was the Ice homestead in Henry coun- 
ty, Indiana. Soon after their marriage Lewis C. Allen and wife 
moved to the farm on which they lived during their married life, 
located one and one-half miles southeast of Hagerstown, Ind. Their 
married life was a happy one and of their union were born six chil- 
dren, one of whom died in infancy, the survivors being Jacob V., 
married to Alary Shaffer; Patricia, married to Karl Ghoring; Joshua 
11., a practicing" attorney in Hagerstown; and Robert ami Caroline, 
the last three named of whom reside on the home farm with the 
widow, the husband and father having died April 30, 1910. Jesse 
Ice, father of Mrs. Allen, was a colonel in the Virginia militia, and 
during the campaign when Anthony Wayne defeated the Indians at 
Fort Wayne he came through Ohio and Indiana with a regiment, 
passing north in Indiana as far as Delaware county, where news 
came to him that Wayne was victorious, and he returned to Virginia. 
It was on this trip that he became impressed with the possibilities 
of the Western country and its future. He was not satisfied in the 
East from that time, but his wife would not consent to move. One 
day, several years after his return to Virginia, he was plowing on 
a sloping hillside, when the lower horse fell, pulling the other down 
with him, and they rolled down the hill, one over the other, until 
the) lodged in a tree, where Colonel Ice found them. He unhitched 
them and returned to the house, where he served notice on his wife 
to get ready- that he was coming to Indiana. Jesse Ice was a son 
of Andrew Ice. who was a soldier in the Revolution, participating 
in General Mcintosh's campaigns in the years J 777-78-79. Andrew 
Ice lived to lie ninety-eight years old and was buried on the farm 
of Frederick Ice, near Ilillsboro, in Henry county, Indiana, but his 
remains were later removed to the cemetery at Mount Summit 
Sarah ( Hickman) Ice, wife of Jesse Ice, was a descendant of Ezekiel 
Hickman, of Virginia, a soldier who died of small-pox during the 
Revolution and the ancestor of the Hickmans in Henry and Dela- 
ware counties, Indiana. Attorney Joshua II. Allen, born Jan. 31, 
1882, a son of Lewis C. and Sarah I'".. ( Ice) Allen, was educated in 
the Hagerstown High School and the University of Indiana, in 
which last named institution he took a course in law and graduated 
with the class of 1905. On Jan. 1, 1906. he began the practice of 
his profession at Hagerstown, in which he has since been success 
fully engaged. He is prominently identified with the Knights ot 
Pythias-, being a member of lodge No. 198, at Hagerstown. and he 
gives unswerving support to the nun and measures of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

William Irvin White, a highly respected Farmer citizen of 
Wayne township, was bom on a farm adjoining the one where he 
resides, Nov. 13, 1838, son of Joseph and Alice (Llawson) White. 
The father was horn in Nelson county, Kentucky, April 3, 1800, 
and the mother in North Carolina, May 29, 1700- The paternal 
grandfather was James White, who died in I hitler county, Ohio, 
where the family had removed in the fall of 1800, and Joseph 
White came to Wayne county with his mother in 1810, when the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 639 

Territory was almost an unbroken wilderness and inhabited by 
Indians. Owing to these conditions the family decided to return 
to Butler county, Ohio, but two years later they again came to 
Wayne county, taking up their residence near Middleborough, 
where Joseph White grew to manhood. There were seven children 
in the family — four sons and three daughters — James, John, Nathan, 
Joseph, Mary, Elizabeth, and Sarah, all of whom are deceased. In 
1836 Joseph White purchased a farm of 160 acres in Wayne town- 
ship, oil the New Paris pike, four miles northeast of Richmond, and 
there iie resided the remainder of his life, adding to his possessions 
until he owned about 300 acres of land at the time of his death. He 
was married in 1821 to Miss Alice Clawson, whose parents were 
pioneer residents of Wayne county. These parents — Mahlon and 
Rebecca (Clark) Clawson came from North Carolina to Indiana 
in an early da)' and settled near Chester, in Wayne count)-, where 
the\- resided the remainder of their lives. They became the parents 
of seven children — Mary, Sarah, Alice, William, Amos, .Mahlon, 
and Abner — all of whom are deceased. Joseph White died Dec. 26, 
1868, and was survived by his widow until Aug. 5, 1872, when she, 
too, passed away at the farm home in Wayne township. They were 
the parents of the following children: Josiah, who married Eliza 
Coburn and after her death was wedded, in 1852, to Hannah E. 
Frame; James, who married Anna T. Stedom ; Lydia, who married 
Reese Mendenhall ; David, who married Nancy Strawbridge and 
after her death was wedded to Martha E. Strawbridge; Anna E., 
who married Hugh G. Nickle; John, who married Mar) J. Gladden; 
William 1. is the next in order of birth; and Joseph C. married Han- 
nah D. Dilks. Of these children but two survive — William I. and 
Joseph C- — and the latter resides on the old White homestead in 
Wayne township, the place adjoining that of his brother, William 
J. William 1. White received his education in the public schools 
of Wayne township and has always followed agricultural pursuits. 
Upon reaching manhood he began his independent career on the 
farm where he now resides, and which was then but partially cleared 
and almost wholly unimproved. lie finished clearing the land, 
erected the buildings thereon, and developed the place into one of 
the fine farm properties of Wayne township, the tract consisting of 
112 acres. On Dec. 25, 1866, he was married to Miss Sarah H. 
Strawbridge, born in Richmond, May 17, 1843, daughter of Iicn- 
jamin and Hannah (Gladden) Straw-bridge, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Maryland. They were married in 
Wayne county and resided here until 1848, when they removed to 
Illinois, where the father died, and the mother then removed to 
Indianapolis, where she spent the residue of her life. They were 
the parents of five children: Mary J. is the widow of D. 1'.. Geary 
and resides at New Paris, Ohio; Martha E. is the widow of David 
White (an older brother of William I.) and resides at New Paris, 
Ohio; Sarah II. is the wife of Mr. White; Nancy E. is deceased, 
as is also William C, the only son in the family. Mr. White is a 
Republican in politics and he and his wife are members of the 
Friends' church. He is regarded as one of the sound and substan- 



6_|0 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

tial men of this locality. Four children were the issue of the mar- 
riage of Mr. and Mrs. White: Ora Mabel has taught in the Colum- 
bian School on the Middleborough Pike for the past thirteen years 
and resides at the parental home; Harry B. resides at home and 
superintends the farm; J. Edwin is a railroad engineer and resides 
in Richmond; and Maurice W. is a clerk in the Pennsylvania rail- 
road office at Richmond. 

Francis W. Robinson. — A publication of this nature exer- 
cises its supreme function when it enters tribute to the memory 
of worthy citizens who have been called from the scene of life's 
endeavors and have left records on which rest no shadow of wrong 
or suspicion of evil. Such a one was Mr. Robinson, one of the 
representative manufacturers of the city of Richmond for more 
than half a century and who ever commanded unequivocal es- 
teem as a man and as a loyal and public spirited citizen. He was 
born in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 9, 1810, and his death occurred at 
his home, 122 North Fifteenth street, in the city of Richmond, 
Nov. 23, 1897. H e was a descendant of Sir William Robinson, 
who came to this country with William Penn. His father — Jehu 
Robinson — and his mother — Mary \nn Willis — belonged to fam- 
ilies early founded in America. He accompanied his parents 
from Baltimore to Philadelphia when two years of age, and was 
reared to maturity in the last named city, where he early became 
familiar with all departments of the carpenter trade, and was af- 
forded the advantages of the common schools of the period. His 
mother died when he was twelve years old, and in 1829 he re- 
moved with his sister and an uncle, John Wills, to Darke county, 
Ohio, later coming to Richmond, where he took up a permanent 
residence. In 1842 he organized the Robinson Machine Works 
and bent his energies and powers to the development of the in- 
dustry and to making his success cme of the cumulative order. 
How well he realized his ambition is shown in the magnitude 
of the business to which he devoted his efforts and intelligent 
direction. He was always progressive in his ideas, so that he 
kept in touch with the advances made in and the requirements 
of the great basic art of agriculture, and lived to the last fully 
appreciative of the ever increasing benefits and privileges which 
it was his to enjoy and to whose procurement he contributed his 
due epiota as a citizen and business man. His life was character- 
ized by inviolable integrity and righteousness and offers both les- 
son and incentive to those who observe its perspective, now that 
he has passed to "that undiscovered country from whose bourne 
no traveler returns." The (inn of Robinson & Company is one of 
the prominent corporations and manufactories of the city of Rich- 
mond, and having been founded in the days of the city's infancy 
it has been closely connected through its owners with the social 
and business life of the community. As before stated, it was 
founded in 1842, by Francis W. Robinson. Succeeding his father, 
the late Henry E. Robinson was president of the company until 
his death, and at the present time S. K. Swaym, a son in-law of 
Francis \V. Robinson, is president; William Platte Robinson is 



MOGRAPIIICAL 64I 

secretary, and Henry Rayburn Robinson is vice-president and 
superintendent. The last two named are sons of the late Henry 
E. Robinson. These officers, with the daughters of the founder, 
form a family corporation which owns and operates the modern 
plant, which has grown from the small beginning, made in 1842, 
at which time a horse provided the power for the works. The 
harvesting and saving of the world's crops is a big theme in in- 
dustrial affairs and one which has taxed inventive genius as much, 
if not more, than any problem of transportation or distribution. 
Richmond men and Richmond machinery have played an impor- 
tant part in the evolution and in the manufacture of modern 
threshing machinery, and the name of "Richmond" has been car- 
ried literally to the ends of the earth on the grain-saving ma- 
chinery made in that city. When Francis W. Robinson began the 
manufacture of grain separators, in 1842, they were known as "chaff 
pilers" and "traveling threshing machines" and did not separate 
the grain from the chaff. lie promptly invented some valuable 
improvements in this regard, purchased the establishment of Ed- 
ward Borton & Son, and in 1860 added portable farm engines and 
"Pitt's" separators to his line. In 1858 his son-in-law, the late 
Jonas W. Yeo, became associated with him, and later, in 1872, 
the works were incorporated as the Robinson Machine Works. 
When the affairs of this corporation were rounded up, in 1877, 
the late Francis W. and Henry E. Robinson, father and son, ac- 
quired full control of the business, under the firm name of Robin- 
son & Co., and it was incorporated under the same name in 
1S89. The main plant now occupies the entire square from Third 
street to Second street, on Main, and north to A street, and about 
an equal area on the east side of Third street. The buildings con- 
sist of a modern office, a large steam and electric plant, a com- 
modious foundry, machine and carpenter shops, fire-proof pattern 
house, test house, and an erecting shop which alone is as capacious 
as the entire plant was in 1884. Branch houses are maintained 
at Indianapolis, Columbus, St. Louis, St. Joseph (Mo.), Stutt- 
gart (Ark.), and at Jennings (La.), and a growing export busi- 
ness is handled through New York offices. The machinery man- 
ufactured consists of traction and portable engines, saw mills, 
threshing machines and attachments, and steam hay balers. This 
machinery threshes rice in Louisiana, Texas, and the Dutch East 
Indies, and separates wheat, oats, and small grain from the straw 
and bales the straw from Colorado to the eastern point of Lung 
Island, in the United States, and also in Africa, Chili, and the 
Argentine. The engines are known in the same territory, wher- 
ever power is needed for threshing, plowing, railroad construc- 
tion, grading and saw-milling. Francis W. Robinson, up to the 
date of his last illness, looked after many of the details of the 
business which he founded and carried on for more than half a 
century, lie was nearly eighty-seven years of age and in the 
full possession of his faculties. He was noted in boyhood for his 
bravery, self-possession, and readiness of resource in time of dan- 
ger, and he loved to excel in the boyhood sport- and in the ex- 



642 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

hibitions of physical prowess, skill or strength. lie was fond of 
boating, swimming, sailing, and fishing, as occupations for leisure 
hours. As before stated, he lost his mother at the age of twelve 
years, and two brothers died in childhood, lie could never refer 
to their loss without showing the tearful eye that betrayed the 
warmth of his affection and the tenderness of his nature, which 
closely blended strength with gentleness. He had three brothers, 
two sisters, and three half-sisters and two half-brothers. He was 
extremely fond of his home, his family and friends, for whom he 
was ever ready to make any sacrifice called for; and no stranger 
ever asked needed aid in vain. This side of his life was worthy 
of much admiration. He was of a lively, sociable nature, fond 
of solid reading, music, poetry, and the drama, and he preserved 
his interest in current topics and his faith in his fellow man to 
the last. He was a personal friend to his employes, and though 
often tried and tested by the experiences of a long life, ami dis- 
appointed sometimes to find his trust in men abused, he newer 
held malice or resorted to retaliation, contenting himself with 
letting the culprit see his true self mirrored in the eyes of an 
honest man. Near the close of his long lite he remarked that 
he would gladly live his life all over again, taking the bitter for 
the sake of the sweet. For more than fifty years lie was a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, passing through 
all the degrees conferred by that order, though he was not an 
active member during the later years of his life. The Odd Fel- 
lows held a special service in his memory at his residence, the 
evening after his death, lie attended and lent his support to the 
North A Street Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, the 
funeral services having been conducted according to the riles in 
use by the religious organization which represented his faith. The 
interment was in Earlham Cemetery. On April 10, 1836, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Robinson to Miss Susan B. Er- 
win, and with this estimable lady he enjoyed the comforts of a 
happy home for nearly fifty-nine years, she having passed away 
Feb. 10, 180.5. Of their eight children, two daughters — Mary A. 
and Anna S. (Mrs. James J. Turner) — preceded them to the eternal 
home, and their only son, the late Henry E. Robinson, died 111 
1909. Five daughters are living and they all reside in Richmond 
— Mrs. Emily I'. Yeo, Mrs. George \Y. Barnes, Mrs. S. E. Swayne, 
and the Misses Eleonora 11. and Frances M. Robinson. 

Thaddeus Nichols, for man)' years a leading farmer of Frank- 
lin township, is a native of Rush county, this State, having first 
beheld the light of day, Sept. to, 1865, son of Harrison Nichols (see 
sketch). Thaddeus Nichols was ten years old when his parents 
moved from Rush county to Franklin township, Wayne county, and 
was reared and received his educational training in the district 
schools there. Upon leaving school he worked in the Bond saw- 
mill for a time and after his marriage removed to the farm where 
he resides. Since the year 1004 he has worked as a salesman for 
Irvin Reed, of Richmond, luck, continuing his residence on the, farm, 
and at all times has devoted his attention to farming. In politics 



BIOGRAPHICAL 643 

lie has always been active in Republican circles, though he has never 
fostered aspirations for public office. Concerning religion he has 
ever entertained liberal views and is not affiliated with any congre- 
gation. His wife is a member of the Middleborough Methodist 
Episcopal church. On Dec. 31, 1S87, he was married to Minnieola 
Stidham, daughter of William and Jane (Strawbridge) Stidham, 
and of this union there is a sun, Clem, born May 9, 1.891, who op- 
erates the farm for his father, lie graduated in the common schools 
of Franklin township and finished his education in a business col- 
lege at Richmond. Another child, a daughter, died in infancy. Mrs. 
Nichols' paternal grandfather, John Stidham, was a native of the 
State of Delaware, but her parents were born in Wayne count)'. 
William Stidham, her father, was born in Franklin township, Oct. 
31, 1834, son of John and Sarah Stidham, natives of Delaware, as 
before stated, lie began his career by farming his mother's place, 
adjoining that now owned by Thaddeus Nichols, and remained 
there until the year 1857. lie then purchased a part of the present 
farm of Air. Nichols and spent the residue of his life there, at the 
same time assisting in managing his mother's place, lie died April 
30, 1N70. lie was a Republican in his political views ami he and his 
wife were associated with the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
the widow still retains her membership. Jane Strawbridge, mother 
of ilrs. Nichols, is a daughter of Joseph* and Nancy (Cankhead) 
Strawbridge, and was born in Wayne township, this county, Jan. 
23, 1838. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania and spent the 
greater part of their lives in Wayne township. On Feb. 5, 1857, she 
was married to William Stidham and of their union were three chil- 
dren: Charles O, born Dec. 24, 1857, married Emma ("ominous and 
is a farmer near Lynn, hid.; Ellis I., born July 14, [859, resides at 
Dayton, Ohio; and Mrs. Nichols was horn Dec. 22/1866. After 
the death of her husband Mrs. Stidham remained upon the farm, 
the same being operated by her sons — Charles G. and Ellis I. — for 
several years. From 1885 to 1887 she lived in Richmond, but in 
1887, when her daughter, Minneola, married, she returned to the 
homestead to spend the balance of her days with her daughter and 
son-in-law, leading a quiet and contented life. 

Emmet E. Druley, who resides in New Garden township, is 
numbered among the successful agriculturists of this county and 
through his connection with this line of industry has gained a com- 
petence and a position of distinctive independence, while it is his 
to retain the confidence and esteem of the people of the county in 
which he maintains his home. lie was born on his father's farm 
in Union county, Indiana, Oct. 11, 1881, a son of Edwin E. and 
Sarah (Moss) Druley, the former born in the city of Richmond. 
Edwin E. Druley was reared and educated in Wayne county and 
is a son of Smith Druley, who came from North Carolina to Indiana 
and was one of the pioneer settlers of Richmond, being one of the 
influential citizens of the community. Edwin E. Druley became one 
of the substantial agriculturists of Union county, where he owned 
a fine landed estate, lie and his wife became the parents of seven 
children. Emmet E. Drulev was reared to maturity under rural 



644 MEMOIRS OF WAV NIC COUNTY 

environment and influence. His early educational privileges were 
those afforded in the district schools of the locality and he duly 
rendered his quota of the work in the cultivation of the home farm. 
Later he took an agricultural course of two years in Purdue Uni- 
versity. Then, after another year on his father's farm, he rented a 
place in Preble county, Ohio, and resided there two years, lie then 
moved to a farm in New Garden township, this county, and two 
years later purchased his present farm, upon which he lias erected 
an attractive modern residence and a commodious barn, lie is a 
Republican in politic.-, and he and his wife are members of the New 
bight Christian Church in Preble county, Ohio. On Sept. i, 1903, 
Mr. Drul ey was united in marriage to Miss F.lla Toney, born in 
Preble county, Ohio, ( )ct. 13, 1S84, a daughter of Andrew and Flora 
Toney, prominent residents of that county; Of this union have been 
born three children: Olive, born July 29, 1904; b.lvert, born Sept. 
28, 1906; and Vied, born Feb. 21, 1908. Mr. Druley makes a spe- 
ciality of raising hogs and cattle in connection with general farming. 
Charles T. Henchman, deceased, for several years a prosperous 
and influential citizen of Richmond, where nine years he was en- 
gaged in the confectioner)' business, and living retired at the time 
of his death, was another of those who attained to success in life 
entirely through his own indefatigable energy and enterprise, lie 
was born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 23, 1832, son of Capt. Louis and 
Mary (Caswell) Henchman, natives of Boston; the father was born 
March 4, 1794, and the mother in June, 1705. The father was a sea 
captain and followed sailing for a livelihood during the greater part 
of his active career, lie was a considerable lime in the United 
States service, under Commodore Decatur and other eminent com- 
manders, but because of an accident was compelled to give up that 
occupation and thereafter lived practically retired. The latter part 
of his life he resided with his son, Charles T., and died at the resi- 
dence of the latter, in Richmond, Dec. 29, 18S2, an exemplary and 
honored citizen, ilis wife preceded him in death a number of years, 
passing away in Boston in January, 1858. Charles T. Henchman 
received a common school education in his native city and in Lex- 
ington, Mass., and then worked for a time as an employe in various 
occupations. He was engaged in the weighing business in Boston 
at the outbreak of the Civil war and enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany I of the Forty-fourth Massachusetts infantry, under Captain 
Kendall. The nucleus of this regiment was the Fourth battalion 
Massachusetts militia, organized at Boston, May 27, 1862, to serve 
during the pleasure of the President, and had been mustered out 
May 31, of the same year. The command volunteered almost as a 
unit when the call came for nine months' troops and was recruited 
to a full regiment at Camp Meigs, Sept. 12. It left the State Oct. 
22, for Newbern, N. C, where it was brigaded with the Twenty- 
fourth Massachusetts, Fifth Rhode Island, and Tenth Connecticut, 
under Colonel Stevenson of the Twenty-fourth. At the end of 
October it engaged in the Tarboro expedition and saw its first fight- 
ing at Rawle's Mill. This expedition occupied two weeks, and in 
December it participated in the Goldsboro expedition. It formed 



BIOGRAPHICAL (>4=5 

part of the reserve at Goldsboro, whence it returned to Newbern, 
and in March went to reinforce a small garrison at Washington, 
N. C, and occupied the town during the siege. The regiment re- 
turned to Newbern on April 24, relieved the Fort) -tilth, and was 
engaged in provost duty until iis term of service expired. It was 
relieved by the Twenty-seventh .Massachusetts, June 6, returned to 
Boston, where it arrived mi the 10th, and was mustered out at Read- 
ville on the 18th. On July 13, on account of the danger of a draft 
riot, it was again called into service for a week. Upon being hon- 
orably discharged from the service Mr. Henchman returned to P>os- 
ton, where he was married and for some time thereafter was en- 
gaged in conducting a feed store. In 1868 he removed to Lafayette, 
Jnd., and engaged in the lumber business, remaining there about 
four years, after which he removed to Indianapolis, where he con- 
tinued in the same pursuit and was lumber inspector until 1882. 
In September of that year he came to Richmond ami engaged in 
the confectionery business, forming" the partnership of Henchman 
& Cox, which association continued a few years and was then dis- 
solved by mutual consent. Air. Henchman then continued the 
business alone until about J891, when he disposed of the establish- 
ment and, because of failing health, lived a retired life until called 
to his reward, Feb. 8, 1908. I lis was an industrious and successful 
career and he was ever recognized as an intelligent, honorable and 
public spirited citizen, in whom his fellow men had implicit faith 
and confidence, lie was ever an ardent adherent of the Republican 
parly and was extremely broad minded and liberal in all of his 
views. On Nov. 5, 1863, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Mary 
A. If. Pingree, who first beheld the light of day in Boston, May 20, 
1X37. daughter of Samuel II. and Mary A. (Edwards) Pingree, 
natives of Newburyport, Mass. The father of Mrs. Henchman was 
born June 2, 1S10, and died March 29, 1886. The mother was born 
April 11, 1810, and was summoned to the life eternal, Sept. 13, 1880. 
The father was a Morocco dresser in early life and later became the 
Western or St. Louis representative of his firm in the hide and 
leather business, lie spent the greater part of his life in hotels in 
St. Louis, going home once or twice each year, and continued in 
that business until his death, which occurred suddenly, lie attained 
to success and prestige as a follower of that pursuit, entirely 
through his own thrift and enterprise, and enjoyed the respect and 
esteem of the entire community in which he was so many years a 
resident. He never fostered ambition for public office, preferring 
to devote his entire time and attention to his business. To him and 
his good wife were born four children: George Edward's is deceased; 
Joseph W. died Feb. 14, H)Oj; Alary A. II. is the widow of Charles 
T. Henchman; and Julia Ah. who died in July, 1906, was the widow 
of a Mr. Taylor. To the happy union of Mr. Henchman and wife 
were born four children: Alary L., wile of Rev. R. F. lvey, D. D., 
a minister at Indianapolis ; Georgiana O, widow of Joseph Richard- 
son, of Columbus, Ohio; Sarah E., who resides at home with her 
mother, and Julia I'., who is the cashier and bookkeeper in the wool 
house of F. C. Taylor & Company, in St. Louis. Mrs. Henchman 



()_)<> MKMOiRS i))' WAYNK COUNTY 

owns a fine residence besides other property in Richmond, and she 
and her daughters also own a beautiful summer home at Bay View, 
Mich., where they reside in the summer. 

Joseph H. Elliott, deceased, for a number of years one of the 
leading citizens of Wayne township, engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits, was born near Dayton, Ohio, May 7, 1836. lie was a son of 
Benjamin and Rachel (Hixon) Elliott. The parents came to Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, in an early day, settling near Spartansburg, 
and there the father was actively engaged in agricultural labors until 
his demise. Of the union of these parents were born seven children, 
five of whom are living: Rebecca is the widow of Clarkson Eulghum 
and resides in West Richmond; Martha is the wife of Charles 
liutchins, a farmer at Lynn, tnd. ; Samuel is a farmer and resides 
near llollandsburg ; Miles is a farmer and resides in Arba, Wayne 
count)-; and May Etta is the widow of Jessie Hubbard and re- 
sides in Winchester. Joseph II. Elliott received his educational 
training in the district schools of Randolph county and remained 
on his father's farm until he had attained his majority. Me then 
purchased land and engaged in farming in Randolph county until 
1893, when he purchased a farm of thirty-five acres, one and one- 
half miles north of Richmond, where he devoted his time to farm- 
ing until he answered the call of his Maker, June 18, 1904. He 
made a specialty of strawberries and fruit raising. His passing was 
a distinct loss to the community in which he had labored, and his 
life was an example whereby many a younger man has shaped his 
career, lie was a Republican in his political views, and although 
earlier in life a member of the Christian church, he later joined the 
Society of Friends. Mr. Elliott was twice married. Mis first wife 
was Anna Jane Wiggs, who bore him seven children : Ray ford, de- 
ceased, was married and had five children — four girls and one son, 
Prank, who resides with Mrs. Elliott ; Alpha, wife of Omar Frank- 
lin, of near Danville, Ilk; Effie resides at the same place; George W. 
resides in Los Angeles, Cal. ; Worley F. resides in Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; and two children died in infancy. On June 22, 1893, ^ Lr - El- 
liott was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Ellen Hawkins, daugh- 
ter of John Hawkins. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Elliott 
remained on the farm four years and then purchased a home in 
Richmond, where she resides and expects to spend the remainder 
of her life. 

Albert H. Hunt, who died at his home in the city of Richmond, 
Dec. 1, 1908, was one of the honored citizens of Wayne county, 
where he maintained his home from his boyhood days until his 
death, and contributed in generous measure to the civic and ma- 
terial development and progress of the county, where he so ordered 
his life as to retain at all times the inviolable confidence and esteem 
of all who knew him. Mr. Hunt was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec 
15, 1851, and thus was fifty-seven years of age at the time when he 
was summoned from the scene of life's mortal endeavors. His 
father was Alonzo Hunt and his mother, Eliza Manifold, was born 
in Pennsylvania. In early life the father was a farmer and later 
engaged in the mercantile business at Westville, Ohio. Still later 



BIOGRAl'IIICAL (47 

he came with his family to Indiana and took up his permanent abode 
in Wayne county. lie settled in Wayne township, east of Rich- 
mond, where he purchased a tract of land, and resided there until 
his health failed, when he moved into Richmond and there died in 
[870. llis widow continued to reside in Richmond until her death, 
about 1903. They were the parents of seven children : Charles died 
in childhood ; Lydia is deceased ; Anna is the wife of Oliver Darland, 
of West Richmond; Albert H. was the fourth in order of birth; 
Emma is deceased ; Malinda is the widow of Jesse Williams and re- 
sides in [ndianapolis; and Martin is a merchant in Cincinnati. Al- 
bert 11. Hunt secured his rudimentary education in the district 
schools at what was called Fountain 11 ill, and earned his own way 
in life from the age of ten years, lie was reared to maturity under 
the parental care and was nineteen years old when his father died. 
He then learned the carpenter trade, but later engaged in farming, 
which he followed about seven years. Then he engaged in the im- 
plement business in Richmond about four years, after which he 
went to Tennessee and remained there one year. Returning to 
Richmond, he engaged as a salesman for an implement firm four- 
teen years, during the first year of the period at Topeka, Kan. He 
then engaged in the real estate business in Richmond and remained 
so employed until his death, and in which he held the unqualified 
esteem of all who knew him and had appreciation of his sterling 
attributes of character. Though never a seeker of the honors or 
emoluments of public office, Mr. Hunt took a deep interest in pub- 
lic affairs of a local order and was ever ready to lend his aid and 
influence in the support of worthy causes and enterpiises. His 
political allegiance was given to the Republican party, and Mrs. 
Hunt is a zealous member of the Presbyterian church. On Oct. 
12, 1876, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hunt to Miss Emily 
F. Holmes, born in Wayne township, near Richmond, April 29, 
1853, a daughter of Walker and Mary J. (Gore) Holmes, natives 
respectively of Wayne county, Indiana, and Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, the former born May 11, 181 1, and the latter July 3, 1816. 
The father was of Scotch and English parentage, his father having 
been born in Ireland, of Scotch parents, and was three years old 
when the family came to America. Mis. Hunt's paternal grand- 
father became a resident of Kentucky and came from there to 
Wayne county, about 1S08. Here he entered the land upon which 
he spent the remainder of his life. His wife died several years pre- 
vious to his demise, leaving a large family of children. The par- 
ents of Mrs. Hunt continued to reside on the old Holmes homestead 
throughout the entire life of the father, who added to and im- 
proved the farm which his father had purchased from the govern- 
ment. He made a specialty of the stock business, was one of the 
originators of the Horticultural Society, and was instrumental in 
getting schools in his vicinity, improving the roads, etc. He died 
Oct. 19, 1868, and some years after his death his widow removed to 
Richmond, where she passed away, Feb. 8, 1887. They were folk 
of noble character and were held in unqualified regard in the commu- 
nity in which they long maintained their home. They were the par- 



648 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ents of five children: John Wesley is deceased; Sarah Ellna is a re- 
tired teacher and resides in Richmond; Mary M. died Nov. 18, 1876; 
Alice V. is the wife of Albert T. Marrow, a retired grocer of Rich- 
mond ; and Mrs. Hunt is the youngest. Mr. and Mrs. Hunt became 
the parents of a daughter, Ruby, born Jan. 10, 1880, the wife of 
Harry M. Jay, of Richmond. 

Edward Bradley Fletcher, deceased, left a record and memory 
that might well be the envy of anyone in the walks of civil life: 
His services to society were given with an enthusiasm and integ- 
rity that permit his life's reviewers to inscribe his name in the civil 
halls of fame and speak of, him as a man whose object in life was 
to secure the betterment of his fellow men and the upbuilding of 
his country. A nation's strength is measured by the loyalty of its 
citizens, and loyalty is a matter of individualism. A traitor to his 
country only gives to others cause fur greater devotion, and the 
example of one whose life is spent in the service of peaceful industry 
is an ever present standard for his brethren. To him who would 
have a pattern for home life and faithful service, let him study the 
life .of Edward D. Fletcher and profit thereby. This worthy gentle- 
man was born in Richmond, Ind., Feb. n, 1857. His predecessors 
were of the early American colonists and it might be said that each 
generation has been among the most useful of citizens. Samuel 
Francis Fletcher, father of Edward 11. Fletcher, was in early life 
a traveling salesman, but later engaged in the tea and coffee busi- 
ness, which he conducted many years. Late in life he retired from 
business, but continued his residence in Richmond until his death, 
about 1803. He took unto himself a wife in his early years, his 
choice being Miss Elizabeth Dix iliatt, born in North Carolina, and 
died in 1907. They were the parents of nine children: Albert W. 
is a stockman and resides in Oklahoma; Sarah Elma ih the wife of 
Elijah Coffin, of Pennsylvania; William H. died in New York City; 
Dr. M. li. is a dentist in Cincinnati, Ohio; Alice is the wife of Dr. 
Langdon, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Francis Nixon resides in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., engaged in the lace business; Edward E. was the next in 
order of birth; Jesse Dix is a traveling salesman and resides in 
Minneapolis; and Charles Coffin is deceased. Edward B. Fletcher 
remained ;it home until his eighteenth year, when he went to New 
York City and engaged as a salesman with the wholesale (inn of 
Mills & Gibbs. What education he had opportunity to acquire had 
been very thorough and his mind was well disciplined. He had at- 
tended the ward schools in Richmond ami also Earlham College, 
and as his was a natural intelligence and activity, soon became a 
leader in the field of his chosen endeavor. After a few years with 
the firm of Mills & Gibbs, in New York City, he engaged in the 
wholesale lace and curtain business with his brother, acting as the 
resident buyer in Europe several years. He resided successively 
in Scotland, France, and England, until [890, when, on account of 
failing health, he returned to America and, taking up his residence 
at Greeley, Colo., resided there until his death, Jan. 24, 1904. He 
was a man who was very fond of reading, writing, drawing,, etc. 
In politics he was an ardent Republican and a strict adherent to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL 640. 

principles and policies of that great party. He was a birthright 
member of the South Eighth Street Society of Friends in Rich- 
mond. On Sept. 23, 1886, he led to the altar Miss Sarah M., daugh- 
ter of William and Mary (Barker) Baxter, of Richmond, and this 
loving couple lived a happy life from then until the time of Mr. 
Fletcher's death. To them were born two children : Esther, born 
Sept. 8, 1888, near Paris, France; and Emily M., born in Notting- 
ham, England, Feb. 17, 1895. After the death of Air. Fletcher his 
widow and daughters returned to Richmond, where they have since 
continuously resided. Mrs. Sarah M. Fletcher, widow of Edward 
B. Fletcher, was born in Camden, N. J., Dec. 3, 1857. Her father 
was William Baxter (see sketch on page 80). Her ancestors were 
people of learning and education and she is gifted with a splendid 
mind, her knowledge of the world and its people having been broad- 
ened by constant reading, study and travel. 

John Henley, deceased, was burn in what is now the city of 
Richmond, Aug. 11, 181 5. He was a man widely known through- 
out this section by reason of his business career. His parents — 
McCaga and Guhelma (Charles) Henley — born in North Carolina, 
were people in modest circumstances. They came to Wayne coun- 
ty, overland, direct from North Carolina, and entered a homestead 
where the city of Richmond stands. The father later disposed of 
this land to his cousin, Thomas Charles, and purchased a farm south- 
east of the town, about one and one-half miles, where he continued 
to reside until his death. His widow survived him some years and 
died at the home of her son, Samuel Henley. They were the par-' 
ents of eight children, all deceased. John Henley obtained his edu- 
cation in a private country school in Wayne township and as a 
young man taught school in the winter and worked at the car- 
penter trade in the summer. In 184J he moved to a farm just north 
of Fountain City, where he resided until about 1865, when he rented 
the farm and came to Richmond, where he engaged in the lumber 
business. lie followed this line of endeavor about twenty-five 
years and then disposed of his interests and retired. About 1882 he 
built the home where his widow resides, and he also built several 
other residences, which he later disposed of. He did a great deal 
of church work and was secretary of the Yearly Meeting House 
when it was built. He also served as clerk of the Monthly Meet- 
ing. On ..Aug. 5, 1842, was celebrated Mr. Henley's marriage to 
Miss Naomi G. Clawson, who died in Richmond, leaving no chil- 
dren. On Oct. 22, 1873, Mr. Henley was married to Miriam W. 
Creen, born at Newport, now Fountain City, in New Garden town- 
ship, June 30, 1840. She is a daughter of Robert and Rachel P. 
(Wilson) Green, the former born in Virginia, in 1804, and the latter 
in North Carolina, Feb. 4, 1809. In early life, for a few years, the 
father followed the business of a hatter in Newport, ami about 
seven years engaged in the mercantile business in the same place, 
following which he was engaged in the hotel business in Newport 
until his death. With Eevi Coffin he was prominently connected 
with the "Underground Railroad" movement, transporting slaves to 
Canada. He died Sept. 3, 1850, and his widow continued her resi- 



650 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

dence at Fountain City until her death, June 17, 1896. They were 
the parents of four children, two of whom are living — Mrs. Henley, 
and Rhoda Ellen, wife of Samuel Perry, of Fountain City. Mrs. 
Henley is a lady of culture and refinement. One child was the 
issue of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Henley — Robert M., born Feb. 
21, 1875. He is a traveling salesman for the Watt & Keeler Corn- 
pan)' and resides with his mother in Richmond. 

Henry Swisher, deceased, who fur many years was one of the 
prominent and respected citizens of Campbellstown, Ohio, was 
born June 23, 1836, near Abington, Wayne county, Indiana. He 
was a son of Jesse and Rachel ( Paddock) Swisher, the former horn 
in Pennsylvania and the latter in Abington township, Wayne coun- 
ty, Indiana. The father was a fanner all of Ins life and the death 
of both parents occurred in Campbellstown, Ohio. Henry Swisher 
attended school in Abington, fnd., and also the schools of Preble 
count}-, after the removal of the parents to Ohio, lie resided with 
his parents until twenty-five years old and then engaged in farming 
near Campbellstown, Ohio, which occupation he followed four 
years. He was then engaged in the mercantile business for several 
years, after which he returned to the farm. He served as post- 
master and was also ticket agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad at 
Campbellstown, and many years engaged in tin- grain and stock 
business, in addition to owning two large farms. On March 13, 
iX(>_\ he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Bulla, daughter of 
Joseph M. and Nancy (Wilson) Bulla, the former born near Rich- 
mond, Wayne county, Indiana, Dec. n, 181 1, and the latter was 
a native of Metamora, Franklin county, Ohio, born in April, 1817. 
The father followed farming as an occupation and resided in Wayne 
county throughout his entire life. lie was quite prominent in local 
affairs and represented Wayne county in the State legislature dur- 
ing the years 1851-52, besides serving in various other local offices. 
To him and his good wife were born eleven children, all of whom 
grew to the age of maturity: Caroline is deceased; Barbara is the 
wife of Francis M. Stanley, a farmer residing south of Richmond; 
Melissa is the widow of Preston Grimes and resides near Rich 
moml ; Thomas is deceased; Sarah was the next in order of birth ; 
Anna is the wife of Lee Druley, a farmer in Boston township ; Susan 
is the wife of Henry Highley, of Richmond ; John is deceased ; Mary 
is the wife of Winfield Smelser, of Richmond; Dora is the wife of 
Mack Foutz, of Pittsburgh ; and J. M. is a practicing physician at 
Portland, Ore. Two children were the issue of the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Swisher: Minnie is the wife of G. W. Murray, of Dublin, 
fnd., and William 11. married Cora Murray, daughter of James 
Murray, of New Paris, Ohio, and is a practicing physician in and 
"v count)', Ohio, with residence at Dayton. 
Campbellstown, Ohio, June jy, 1905, and his 
grief to a large circle of friends. His widow 
it Campbellstown until June 1, 1907, when she 
nd purchased the Hat where she resided 
leath, April 2, ioir. The old home in Ohio, 
Home," was burned, with all of its con 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 65 1 

tents, in her absence, and she then sold the land. Mr. Swisher's 
life was a striking example of the truth of the axiom that attention 
to the little things, scrupulous integrity, and energy are certain 
auguries of success. 

George H. Grant, who for many years was one of the foremost 
figures in the educational and manufacturing life of the city of 
Richmond, was born in Lyman, Me., May 1, 1828, son of Samuel 
and Jane (Gould) Grant, the former a native of the Pine Tree State 
and the latter was born in Massachusetts. The father always fol- 
lowed farming as an occupation and the parents spent their lives 
on their farmstead in Maine. The educational advantages of George 
H. Grant were those afforded by the Alfred Academy in his native 
State, and throughout his lifetime he gave unswerving allegiance 
to the principles of Republicanism. He remained at home until 
about twenty-one years old and then went to Boston, where he 
worked in the large wholesale fruit house of Jones & Farley, im- 
porters, for a couple of years. In 1851 he came to Ohio and for a 
time taught school near Lebanon, in 1853 nc came to Richmond 
and accepted the position as principal of the first high school in the 
place, under Professor Hurty. Later he succeeded Professor ilurty 
as superintendent, which position he occupied when the original 
Garfield School was erected, lie resigned this position to become 
the Indiana representative of the firm of Wilson. 1 1 inkle & Com- 
pany, of Cincinnati, and after serving two years in that capacity 
began the manufacture of school furniture, office and court sup- 
plies, lie invented several articles along this line, one of which was 
a holding desk, known as the "Richmond Rustic." llis first partner 
in the manufacturing business was a Mr. Allen, who died of cholera 
in 1866 and was succeeded by Joseph Merchant. Mi'. Merchant's 
interest was later purchased by Turner Haines and Joshua Nick- 
urson, the firm being known as Geo. II. Grant & Company, and the 
factory was located at what is now Twelfth and North E streets. 
In 1872 Mr. Nickerson's interest was purchased by William F. 
Spencer, and five years later Mr. Grant retired from the manage- 
ment of the concern, but continued with the firm as a representa- 
tive three years. Then, in company with a .Mr. llempleman ami Eli 
Jay, he formed a company ami again engaged in the manufacturing 
business, at the corner of Eighth and Washington streets. In 1SS3 
Mr. Jay sold his interest in the business to Mr. Swayne and the 
firm became known as Grant & Swayne." In 1880 Mr. Grant dis- 
posed of his interest and retired from active business. Having lived 
to see the two factories which he established develop into two of 
the foremost concerns in Richmond, he died April 4, 1898. On July 
20, 1858, was celebrated Mr. Grant's union to Miss Mary Isabella 
Blanchard, born in Richmond, Nov." 12, 1836, daughter of William 
and Isabella (Foster) Blanchard. These parents were natives of 
Massachusetts, the father born at Rrookfield, Oct. 1, 1800, and the 
mother at Oakham, Jan. 10, 1805. They were married Dec. 13, 1826, 
and removed to Rhinebcck, N. Y., on the Hudson river, where they 
continued to reside until September, 1835, when they removed , to 
Richmond, Ind., and lived there continuously until their deaths. 



652 MEMOIRS OF WAV NIC COUNTY 

William Blanchard and his brother, Albert C. Blanchard, engaged 
in the mercantile business in 1835, and continued as a firm until 
1848, when Albert C. Blanchard withdrew and devoted himself to 
the affairs of the Richmond branch of the State Bank of Indiana, 
of which he was the president and a director. He was born in 1808, 
at Brookiield, Mass., and came to Richmond in 1832, and induced 
his brother William to join him in business in 1835, as before stated.' 
Jle was elected a director and president of the State Bank in 1835 
and held that position until the expiration of the charter, in 1855. 
In 1853, with Robert Morrisson and Charles F. Coffin, he organized 
a private bank, called "Citizens' Bank of Richmond," and was con- 
nected with it until 1861, when, on account of the ill health of his 
wife, he transferred his interest to his son, Albert II. Blanchard, 
and removed to lirookfield, Mass., his early home, where he died 
in 1874, aged 66 years and 3 months, in the house where he was 
born. William Blanchard was a cabinet and furniture maker by 
trade, which he followed in Rhinebeck, N. Y., but he continued in 
the drygoocls business in Richmond until about 1856, when he en- 
gaged in the insurance business and followed that occupation until 
his death, March 27, 1881, aged 80 years and live months, and his 
wife, Isabella, died June 9, 1883, aged j8 years and five months. 
The)' were the parents of seven children, three of whom are living: 
William A. resides in Cincinnati; Emma is the wife of Frank Van- 
uxom, of Oakland, Cak, and Mrs. Grant is the fifth in order of birth. 
William Blanchard was one of the pioneers in the Presbyterian 
church at Richmond, and he and his wife united with that organi- 
zation, Ma)- 4, 1844. Rev. Thomas Whallon, the pastor at that time, 
was the father of Rev. K. P. Whallon, D. D., now one of the edi- 
tors of "The Herald and Presbyter," of Cincinnati. On March 14, 
1846, William Blanchard was elected a Ruling Elder in the church 
and continued in that position until the close of his life. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Grant were born t'wn children: Jennie is the wife of Harry 
Mather, of Richmond; William died in infancy; Edward C. resides 
in. Cambridge, Mass.; Herbert died in 1908; and Wilbur S. resides 
in Rochester, X. Y. 

Ira Moore, who was an extensive land owner and fanner in 
Wayne county, was born east of Richmond, in Wayne township, 
near the State line, Dec. 22, 1853, and died in this, the count)' of his 
birth, Jul) 11, 1898. He was a son of Ira and Mary (Thorn) 
Moore, natives of Xew Jersey. The father came to Wayne town- 
ship in an carl)- day and" was engaged in farming operations during 
the remainder of his active career. 1 fc died about 1884 and his wife 
passed away in March, 1902. They were the parents of eleven chil- 
dren. Ira Moore was educated at the Sycamore Valley school in 
Wayne township and all of his life was devoted to agricultural pur- 
suits, and a noteworthy success and excellent record was made by 
him. lie continued on his father's farm until married, and later 
he and his younge'st brother purchased the farm. After nine years 
of this partnership Ira purchased the entire tract and at the time 
of his death owned 160 acres of finely cultivated land, as productive 
as any in this county, one that leads all sections of the country in 



UIOGUAPIIICAL 653 

fertility and producing quality. In politics he belonged to the Re- 
publican party, but found no leisure to devote to becoming a candi- 
date for office of a public nature, his home and family having been 
given his entire time. As are the surviving members of his family, 
Mr. Moore was a devout communicant of the liicksite Friends 
Church, of which he was a birthright member. On (Jet. 25, 1882, 
was celebrated Mr. Moure's union to Miss Anna Taylor, born south- 
west of Richmond, in Wayne township, Oct. 13, 1858, daughter of 
Samuel and Jane (Barnes) Taylor, the former of whom came to 
Wayne county in 1836. The father was born in Delaware, Nov. 28, 
1833, and the mother in Wayne county, Indiana, June 16, 1836. The 
father came to Indiana when about three years of age and the fam- 
ily settled in Wayne township, three miles west of Richmond. They 
made the journey overland, and soon after their arrival in Wayne 
count)- the father of Samuel Taylor died, but the other members of 
the family continued to reside in their new home. When a small 
boy Samuel Taylor came to Richmond and worked as an apprentice 
in a carriage shop for a year and a half, and then worked as a farm 
hand until he was married. He then purchased a farm in Wayne 
township and continued to reside thereon until 1906, when he sold 
it and is now living retired in Richmond, lie and his good wife are 
the parents of five children: Elyda E. died in 1876; Anna is the sec- 
ond in order of birth; John W. is a farmer and stock-buyer and re- 
sides at Economy; Frank M. is the cashier of the First National 
Hank in Richmond; and Charles S. is a traveling salesman for the 
Jones Hardware Company of Richmond. After the death of Mr. 
Moore his widow rented the farm and removed to Richmond, where 
she now resides. To Mr. and Mrs. Moore were born three chil- 
dren: Everett, born Oct. 16, 18S3 ; Walter F., born July 10, 1887; 
and one child died in infancy. 

Henry Daniel Zuttermeister, deceased, among the early Ger- 
man settlers of this county, was born in Germany, Nov. 18, 1831. 
J lis parents never came to this country, lie received such educa- 
tion as could be had in the schools of his native land in that day 
and spent his early years in the place of his birth. He remained 
there until his majority and then came to America, direct to Rich- 
mond, where a sister resided. This sister was Mrs. Saflolh, who 
afterward married John Barr, and her son is engaged in the bakery 
business in Richmond. Mr. Zuttermeister first obtained employ- 
ment on the railroad, on construction work, afterward assisted 
masons, etc., and later engaged in the retail liquor business one 
year. After retiring from that business he practically lived a re- 
tired life until his death, Aug. 7, 1874. Mr. Zuttermeister was mar- 
ried in Richmond, Aug. 18, 1852, to Miss Elizabeth Hart, daughter 
of Conrad and Wilhelmina Hart, born in Germany and who came 
to this country in 1848, locating on a farm near Fvansville, Inck, 
afterward moving into the city of Evansville, where the father se- 
cured employment as a weaver and spent the remainder of his life 
After his death the mother went to Lawrence, Kan., where she re- 
sided with a son until her death. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, three of whom died in Germany, and Mrs. Zuttermeister is 



654 MEMOIR'S OF WAV NIC COUNTY 

the only one living. She was born in Germany, March 25, 1836, 
coming' to America when twelve years old. She is a member of 
the Lutheran church, and since the death of her husband has con- 
tinued her residence at the home place, which was the first house 
built on South Ninth street, in Richmond. She and her husband 
became the parents of eight children : Charles F. is engaged in the 
livery and transfer business in Richmond; Louis is a confectioner 
in Lawrence, Ivan.; Conrad died in infancy; William is a hotel 
proprietor in Chicago; James died in Richmond, leaving a son, 
t harles; Henry 1). is engaged in the commission business in Rich 
mond; Anna E. \V. resides with her mother; and George Winlield 
also resides in Richmond. 

Washington I. Dulin, deceased, was born near Chester, Wayne 
township, Aug. 14, 184-'. His parents were William ami lieulah 
(Brown) Dulin, the former born on the eastern shore of .Maryland, 
near Easton, Talbot county, Feb. 10, 1801, son of James and .Mary 
Dulin, and the mother was born at Woodbury, \. J., in 1800, and 
came to Indiana with her parents in 1819. In early life the father 
was an overseer on a large plantation and came to Indiana in the 
'30s, having contracted his first marriage in Maryland, lie settled 
in Wayne count)', near Chester, where he purchased a farm and 
continued to reside until just before the beginning of the Civil war, 
when he disposed of his farm and removed to Richmond, where he 
lived practically retired. He served as assessor many years and 
died in Richmond in the early "70s, his second wife, the mother of 
Washington 1., surviving until \&j<). Three children were born to 
them, Washington I. being the youngest. The others were Charles, 
who is deceased, and Alice, who became the wife of John Lancaster 
and is also deceased. Washington I. Dulin was educated in this 
count)', first attending the schools in Chester and later the school 
which was formerly located at the corner of Seventh ami A streets 
in Richmond. His first work in life was in the employ of others, 
and before he was eighteen years old he engaged in an enterprise 
on the Newman homestead of trying to produce Osage oranges 
for hedge, ami also gave some attention to the raising of grapes. 
About 1865 or 1806 he engaged in the lumber business in Richmond, 
and about the year 1871 he moved into the city and continued in 
the lumber business until about 1885 or 1886, when he disposed oi 
his interests to William Cain. Lis location was at the corner of 
what is now Eleventh and Main streets, and after selling to William 
Cain he engaged in the produce commission business a short time, 
lie was then engaged in the furniture business about three years, 
and also for a time in the bakery business, and then entered the 
real estate business, in which he continued till the time of his death, 
\ T ov. 14, [892. He was also interested in the promotion of the 
Evansville & Richmond railroad, which, however, did not mate- 
rialize. In 1876 he built the commodious home where his widow 
resides, and he did a great deal to improve the city. Sueess had at- 
tended all his individual efforts in life, and he passed away, having 
the respect of the entile community; and he is remembered by all 
as a man of integrity and honor. His family was always treated 



BIOGRAPHICAL O55 

with the greatest kindness, and friends and strangers always met 
with courtesy and consideration at his hands. 11 is death occurred 
in his fifty-first year, just at the time when he had so constructed 
his fortune and so lived his life that the years before him to lill out 
the da)'s of "three score ami ten," which should he our lot, were 
years he looked forward to with the greatest pleasure, and it can 
truthfully be said that his life was such that he will never be for- 
gotten while there lives anyone who had the good fortune to be 
associated closely with him. Politically he never aspired to hold 
public office, but was importuned on several occasions to be a can- 
didate for alderman ami served as councilman from the Fifth ward 
several years, giving an administration carefully conducted. Social- 
ly connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, he was 
a faithful attendant of their meetings and a linn believer in their 
principles. On Oct. 9, iSo_\ was celebrated .Mr. Dulin's marriage 
lo Miss Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Millicent ( Ratlil'f) New- 
man. Mr. and Mrs. Newman were natives of New Garden town- 
ship, Guilford count)-, North Carolina, the former born Nov. 28, 
1704, and the latter, Jan. 28, 1797. The father was a miller by occu- 
pation and came to Indiana in an early day and engaged in the mill- 
ing business, lie also erected a paper mill, the first established in 
Wayne county, and continued in milling enterprises until his death, 
in 1845. lie plunged into the water to save the mill dam and from 
the exposure contracted an illness, of which he died. Eight chil- 
dren were born to him and his good wife: Anna C., born Aug. 14, 
1827, became the wife of Miles J. Shinn, Sept. 18, 1849, and died 
near Wichita, Kan., Oct. 22, 1884; Joseph, born Aug. to, 1829, died 
in childhood ; Elizabeth, born Jan. 9, 1834, became the wife of George 
liushnel] and died in 1909; Mary, born Aug. iS, 1835, became the 
wife of William W. Folk, now deceased, ami she resides at Spring 
Grove; Jonathan, born May 3, 1838, is an attorney in Richmond; 
Thomas Jefferson, born Sept. 18, 1841, is deceased; and Rebecca, 
widow a\ Mr. lhilin, was born March 3, 1843, j us1: north of Rich- 
mond, on what is called "Newman's Hill." To her and her husband 
was born one child — Jesse Benton — April 10, 1865, who resides at 
the parental home. 

William Price Estelle, who died in the city of Richmond, Oct. 
9, 1871, had been a resident of this county thirty-erne years, and left 
a reputation and record that might be the envy of any citizen of 
this country. His reputation for right was builded on such sub- 
stantial foundations and his record of life's service was so identi- 
fied with progressiveness that he who follows his example will 
always be a leader among men. This worthy gentleman was born 
near I'emberlon, N. J., April 23, 1830, his father being Richard and 
his mother Rebecca ( Fennimore) Estelle. Both parents were na- 
tives of New fcrsev, the father born in 1804 ami the mother in 1808; 
and the death of the former occurred about 1873 and that of the 
latter in 1906. Richard Fstelle's life work was begun as a shoe- 
maker, and he was engaged in the manufacture of shoes before 
coming to Richmond. From New Jersey he removed with his fam- 
ily to Indiana, in 1840. llis first and permanent location was in the 



656 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

city of Richmond, where he engaged in the shoe business some time 
and then became interested in the jewelry business, in which lie 
was engaged until his death, his two sons being interested with him 
during the later years. After his death his widow resided with the 
widow of William P. until her demise. Two suns were born to the 
elder Estelles, William P. being the elder, and the younger, Samuel 
F., is engaged in the manufacture of a car seal, an article of his own 
invention, at Los Angeles, Cal. William P. Kstelle was educated 
in the schools of Richmond and remained with his father until 
twenty years old. The business of photographing was given early 
attention by him and he learned this trade under a Mr. Watson, of 
Richmond, with whom he later became associated as partner. This 
partnership existed a number of years, being finally dissolved by 
the death of Mr. Watson, and Mr. Kstelle then formed a partner- 
ship with a .Mr. Maxwell. Upon the death of the last named Mr. 
Estelle continued the business alone until his demise. Politically 
Mr. Estelle was a Republican. On Nov. 16, 1859, he chose for a life 
companion, Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Faraby) Doz- 
ier, natives of North Carolina. The mother died at the time of 
Mrs. Estelle's birth, and two years later her father married a Mrs. 
Walters. About 1S41 he removed from Germantown, Ohio, near 
which place Mrs. Estelle was born, to Milton, Wayne county, and 
there engaged in the practice of medicine some time, but for sev- 
eral years before his death the condition of his health prevented the 
active practice of his profession, lie died in 1853 and his widow 
died some years later in Illinois. Of his first marriage were born 
four children — Frances, Enoch, David, and Elizabeth — all passed 
away but Mrs. Estelle. This estimable lady was born near German- 
town, Ohio, July 4, 1838, and to her and her husband were born 
three children: Anna, born Nov. 23, 1S60, became the wife of 
Charles M. Jenkins, an optician of Richmond, and died in May, 
1890; Frances, born April 23, 1862, was educated in Richmond, be- 
came a teacher of German in the public schools of that city, and 
died in 1888; and Harry F., born May 3, 1878, married Lydia Van 
Austori, of Ohio, and is engaged in the jewelry business in Dayton. 
Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Estelle has resided contin- 
uously in Richmond, her present abode being at 113 South Thir- 
teenth street. 

Richard H. Swift, deceased, held the office of internal revenue 
inspector, was also for a time engaged in the United States mail 
service, and is remembered as a careful and efficient officer, always 
faithful to his trust, never shrinking in his duty, and he was a good 
friend to all. lie was born at Blooming Grove, Ind., Sept. 26, 1826, 
and his parents were Richard and Elizabeth Swift, natives of Penn- 
sylvania. The parents settled in Indiana at an early date and lo- 
cated in Franklin county, the greater portion of whose early in- 
habitants were from the Keystone State. Franklin county was the 
home of this family until the death of the parents, the father giving 
his attention to agriculture. To this couple were born three chil- 
dren, none of whom is living, and Richard H. was the youngest. 
Richard II. Swift was educated in the district schools of Franklin 



BIOGRAPHICAL 657 

county and began his work in life as a school-teacher. He later 
moved to Brookville, Ind., where he edited the "American" a num- 
ber of years. Quitting the newspaper in 1870, he came to Richmond 
and engaged in business with the Robinson Machine Company, but 
this venture proved disastrous and he suffered considerable loss. 
After retiring from the machine business he moved to a farm near 
Economy, but after two years in that occupation returned to Rich- 
mond and engaged in the United States mail service as clerk, act- 
ing as such up to the time of his death, Feb. 13, 1885. Politically 
Air. Swift was a Republican, an ardent adherent to the principles 
of that party, and as such was appointed to the offices spoken of. 
He was twice married, first to Martha DeBolt, who died in Brook- 
ville in 1869, and of this union were born four children: Laura Vir- 
ginia is the wife of James Ellis Davis, a traveling shoe salesman 
of Chicago; Clara E. is the wife of John W. Taylor, a musician of 
Chicago; Albert is a printer and resides in Chicago; and Elizabeth 
A. is the widow of Vincent If. Boyd and also resides in Chicago. 
On July 23, 18S4, occurred the marriage of Mr. Swift to Mrs. Han- 
nah (Hyde) Herron, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth (Miller) 
Hyde. These parents were born in Manchester, England, the father 
on April 8, l/*)?, and the mother on Nov. 6, 1802. By occupation 
Mr. Hyde was a farmer and he came to America in 1830, locating in 
Montgomery county, Ohio, where he remained a short time and 
then came to Eranklin count} - , Indiana, where he cultivated a farm 
which came to his wife by inheritance. There the parents spent the 
residue of their lives, the father dying March 7, 1871, and the moth- 
er, Jan. 25, 1883. Mrs. Swift was their only child, born near Mount 
Carmel, Ind., Sept. 30, 1836. On Oct. 20, 1S57, she married George 
Herron, born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, June 4, 1819. He 
came to Indiana about 1840 and located in Eranklin countv, where 
he became a land-owner, his farm adjoining that of his wife's par- 
ents. They resided there until his death, April 26, 1872. He was 
a brother of Professor Herron. of the Herron Institute at Indian- 
apolis. After Mr. Swift's death Mrs. Swift returned to Eranklin 
county, but about four years later, in October, 1889, she again came 
to Richmond, disposed of all her real estate, and purchased the 
very commodious home where she now resides. 

Stiles Dougan, for many years a valued and trustworthy citizen 
of Wayne county and a leader in agricultural pursuits, was born 
southeast of Richmond, in Wayne count v r , Sept. 24, 1833. His par- 
ents — John C. and Rebecca (Holmes) Dougan — were natives of 
Tennessee, but were married in Wayne county. The father came 
to Indiana in an early day and purchased a farm southeast of Rich- 
mond, where he resided until his death, in April, 1871, his wife 
passing away several years earlier. Of their union were born three 
children, one of whom died in infancy, Lucinda died in 1847, and 
Stiles was the youngest. Stiles Dougan attended the schools in 
Wavne township and also was a student for a time in the schools 
of Richmond. He resided with his father until 1862, when he be- 
came the owner of the home farm and there continued to reside, 
devoting his entire time to the farm, until his death, Oct. 29, 1886. 



658 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

On Feb. 19, 1862, Mr. Dougan was married to Miss Almina, daugh- 
ter of Hugh U. and Martha E. (Fryer) Taylor. Mr. Taylor was 
horn in Knoxville, Tenn., June 14, 1816, and Mrs. Taylor in Wayne 
county, July 8, 1817. The father was always a farmer. He came 
with his parents to Wayne county very early and located southeast 
of Richmond, q» a farm, where he grew to the age of maturity. 
Later in life he removed to Iowa, in 1850, and there resided until his 
death, Sept. 12, 1853. The mother then returned with her family 
to Richmond and died there in 1898. To these parents were horn 
three children: Martha F., wife of Isaac Dougan, of Spring Grove; 
Almina is the second in order of birth, anil Elizabeth Lavinia died 
in infancy. Mrs. Dougan was born south of Richmond, in Wayne 
county, (Jet. 12, 1843. After the death of her husband, she resided 
on the farm until 1903, when she purchased the home where she 
resides, on North Seventh street, in Richmond. Of her union with 
Mr. Dougan were born four children: John C, born July 9, 1871, 
was married to Margaret M. DeLamater Aug. 11, 1895, ms wife died 
July 2, J900, and he resides with his mother in Richmond; Jennie 
M., born March jj, 1874, is the wife of Frank C. Johnson, a farmer 
near Fountain City, and the)- have two daughters — Caroline A., 
born Jul}- 15, 1897, and Margaret I), born Nov. (>, 1900; and Frank 
T. and Fred II. were twins, bom Sept. 9, 1S77, the former dying at 
the age of four years, and the latter married Daisy Mote and resides 
in Richmond. 

James R. Edgeworth, son of one of the pioneers of Preble 
county, Ohio, an honest and upright man and a good citizen, was 
born near Morning Sun, in the above named county and State, July 
20, 1847, and died at his home on the Boston pike, south of St. 
Mary's Cemetery, Aug. 6, 1885. llis life followed the course of 
thrift, ecenomy, and industry, and, notwithstanding he was cut 
oil in his prime, he had so established Ins fortune and reputation 
that he left his widow well prepared for the battle of life and a 
name that has endured, llis parents were Samuel and Jane (Mc- 
Millan) Edgeworth, natives of Preble county, Ohio. The "father Was 
a miller by occupation and operated a mill at Morning Sun, Ohio, 
several years, lie also engaged in farming and at the time of his 
death owned a line faun near that place, lie died of cancer in a 
hospital at Cincinnati, when the son, James R., was a small boy. 
After his death the mother removed to Kansas, but later returned 
to Preble count)-, Ohio, and died at the residence of her son, James 
R., in 1876. She and her husband were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, three of whom are living: Samuel is a farmer and resides in 
Union count}-, Indiana; Harvey resides in Ottawa, Kan.; and Ro- 
sanna resides with her brother, Harvey. James R. Edgeworth's 
early education was obtained in the schools of his birthplace, and 
he was reared on a farm at Morning Sun, Ohio, where he resided 
until about 1869, when he went to Kansas with his mother. They 
located near Ottawa, Kan., on a farm, and there he resided about 
six years. He then returned to Preble county, Ohio, and resided 
on his wife' grandmother's farm seven years. At the end of this 
period he and his wife broke up housekeeping, because of his fail- 



BIOGRAPHICAL O50. 

ing health, and resided for a short time at Cambridge, Ga. They 
then returned to Mrs. Edgewurth's father's farm, in Union county, 
Indiana, and later purchased a small farm on the Boston pike, south 
of St. Mary's cemetery, where they resided until the death of the 
husband. In politics Mr. Edgeworth was a Republican, but never 
an office-seeker. Airs. Elizabeth Alice ( Lybrook) Edgeworth, who 
became the wife of James R. Edgeworth, Feb. 13, 1873, is a daughter 
of Baltzer and Jane (Cunningham) Lybrook, of Union county, In- 
diana. Mr. Lybrook was a farmer by occupation and lived his en- 
tire life cm a farm near where he was born in that county. Mr. 
Lybrook died Dec. 1, 1892, and his widow passed away March 2, 
1893. There were eleven children born to them: Jacob Henry, 
Margaret Ellen, and Ann Maria are deceased; Leander Thomas re- 
sides in New Castle; Mrs. Edgeworth is the next in order of birth; 
Sarah Estella is deceased; Mary Jane is the widow of Albert Ram- 
sey and resides in Richmond; Laura Belle is the wife of Samuel 
Edgeworth, a farmer in Union county; Henrietta is the wife of 
Daniel Orebaugh, of near Kitchell, Union county; Minnie Luella 
is the wife of Isaac Hart, of Richmond; and Madison is deceased. 
Mrs. Edgeworth was horn Feb. 4, 1852. After the death of her 
husband she resided on the farm until 1893, when she sold it and 
purchased the home where she resides, at 225 South Eighth street, 
in the city of Richmond, and has resided there continuously since. 
She is a devout member of the United Presbyterian church of that 
place. Her father was a native of Union county, Indiana, born Aug. 
28, [82-1, and her mother was born in Virginia, Jan. 22, 1825. 

Charles Davis Hire was born in Center township, Wayne 
county, Indiana, April 21, 1867, and has always lived on the farm 
upon which he was born. His father, Frederick Hire, is called to 
mind as one of the early settlers of Center township and a man who 
was prosperous in his undertakings, especially in his efforts to build 
up a home and secure a competency. Frederick Hire was born near 
Chillicothe, Ohio, Aug. 1, 1824, and from the time he was sixteen 
years old until twenty-one he resided with his uncle at Leesburg, 
Ohio, having previously been a bound boy at Chillicothe. About 
1845 he came to Indiana, locating first in Center township, this 
county, and in 1855 moved to the farm which constitutes the Hire 
homestead in Center township, having previously lived a short time 
near Portland, in J a)- count)-. Mr. Hire was reared to the habits 
of industry. He was married Feb. 9, 1854, to Miss Nancy Davis, 
a native of Center township, born on the farm where her son re- 
sides, Aug. 0, 1833, and this tract she inherited from her father at 
his death. She was the daughter of Aaron Davis, a native of Ken- 
tuck) and an early settler of Center township. In 1863, Frederick 
Hire enlisted as a private in Company E of the Seventh Indiana 
cavalry for service in the Civil war. This regiment was organized 
al Indianapolis in the summer of 1863, b\ authority of the Secretary 
of War, for three years, and was mustered in by companies, the 
organization being completed Oct. 1. It left the Stale Dec. 6, re- 
porting at Louisville, and was ordered to Union City, Tenn. It was 
assigned to the First brigade (Brigadier-General Grierson com- 



66o MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

mantling), Sixth division, Sixteenth corps. It moved with a force, 
cm Dec. 24, into Mississippi to cut off Forrest in his retreat from 
Jackson, Term., being in a brisk skirmish with his forces near Paris. 
It was engaged in a sharp fight at Egypt Station, Miss., and in a 
severe battle near Okolona, Feb. 22, 1864. 'The enemy drove the 
Union forces from the field, but the Seventh cavalry held the enemy 
in check and saved the train after the division had lied. Later, it 
made a saber charge, saving a battery that had been abandoned, but 
was finally compelled to retire. It was complimented by the com- 
manders for its valor. It was stationed near Memphis some time, 
engaged in scouting. Moving with Sturgis' forces upon Forrest, 
the enemy was engaged at Guntown, Miss., in heavy force, a des- 
perate fight ensuing, in which the Seventh took part. It was again 
complimented by General Grierson for having repulsed repeated 
charges by superior numbers. It was on railroad guard duty near 
Memphis, being in a fight at La Mavoo, Miss., Aug. 18. Leaving 
Memphis in November, 1S64, it marched with Mower's division 
through Arkansas in pursuit of Price's forces, proceeding as far as 
Cape Girardeau, where it took steamers to St. Louis, marching into 
the interior of Missouri. Returning to Memphis, it took part in an 
expedition in search of Forrest, surprising his dismounted force at 
Vernon, capturing the camp and a large quantity of stores, sixteen 
cars loaded with pontoons for Hood's army, and 4,000 new English 
carbines. On the 28th the enemy was attacked at Egypt Station, 
his forces captured or dispersed, and a train of fourteen cars de- 
stroyed. The regiment was actively engaged in scouting and on 
provost duty near Memphis until June, 1865, hut Mr. Hire was 
mustered out of the service in May of that year, on account of ill 
health. He returned to his home in Center township and resided 
there until his death, Aug. 5, 1887. He and his good wife became 
the parents of five children: Harvey and Amanda are deceased; 
Lizzie is the wife of Jewett Anderson, of Winchester, Ind. ; Charles 
D. is the next in order of birth ; and John is deceased. The father 
made the home place of sixty-seven acres one of the best improved 
farms in Center township. Charles D. Lire received his education 
in the schools of District No. 2, in Center township, and when about 
twelve years old began working for others, driving horses to a hay 
baler. He worked for others until twenty years old and then pur- 
chased a threshing outfit, and has been engaged in the threshing 
business ever since. He is an expert machinist and does all kinds 
of threshing and shredding, besides operating his farm in a general 
way, and buying and selling stock to some extent. On June 11, 
1904, he was married in the city of Richmond to Miss Mary Holly, 
born in Putnam county, Indiana, Feb, 4, 1875, daughter of Heze- 
kiah and Sarah (Anderson) Holly, and of this union has been born 
a daughter, Sarah Belle, born Feb. 14, 1008. The parents of Mrs. 
Hire were born in Ohio, the father in Allen county, in 1843, and the 
mother in Ross county, in 1846. The father was always a farmer 
by occupation. They removed to Richmond about 1895, an( ' there 
the father died in 1900, the mother still maintaining her residence 
in that city. In politics, Charles D. Hire has always been a Re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 66l 

publican, and he is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, 
also having a life membership in the Western Travelers' Accident 
Association. Mrs. Hire is one of seven children born to her parents. 
George Archie Webb, another of Wayne county's sons of ster- 
ling worth, who has long been identified with the industrial growth 
of the county, was born on North Sixth street, in the city of Rich- 
mond, Nov. 9, 1870. He is a son of William YV. and Isabelle (Bald- 
win) Webb, the former born in Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1839, 
and the latter in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1842. They 
were married in Washington, Pa., Nov. 1, 18O4, and came to Rich- 
mond in December of that year, where the father engaged in rail- 
road employment. On July 29, [861, William W. Webb enlisted 
for service in the Civil war and served two years in the Union 
army, as a member of Company A, Third Indiana cavalry, serving 
with the Army of the I'otoinac. After coming to Richmond, as 
before stated, he engaged in railroad work, as a fireman, and later 
was employed as engineer at the Wayne Works twelve or fourteen 
years, lie then became the care-taker of the Knights of Pythias 
temple ami also the Presbyterian church, being thus employed until 
the fall of 1910, when he purchased a twenty-acre tract near 
the edge of the city and has since been engaged in the trucking 
business, lie is a member of the Knights of Pythias. His wife 
died Sept. 8. 1900, the mother of four children : Theodore J resides 
with his father; John is deceased; Charles is engaged in the bicycle 
business in Richmond, and George A. is the youngest. George A. 
Webb's education was received in Richmond and the district schools 
of Wayne township, but his advantages were limited, due to the 
necessity of his early assuming life's responsibilities, for he began 
working for others at the age of twelve years and continued to do 
so until married. At the age of six years he helped a truck farmer 
by holding the horse while the product was being disposed of. At 
the age of twelve he began work at the bench in Henley's machine 
shop in Richmond, and remained thus employed about two years, 
lie then went to Spring Grove and worked on a farm about four 
years, after which lie worked in the shop of Gaar, Scott ec Com- 
pany, about four, years, lie continued in various lines of employ- 
ment, chiefly farm work, until married, when he settled on the 
eighty acres of land where he resides, lie devoted himself assidu- 
ously to improving the land, ami has one of the finest and most 
highly cultivated farms in Wayne township, admirably equipped as 
to modern rural conveniences, including a beautiful modern resi- 
dence. In this pleasant and comfortable home he expects to spend 
the remainder of his days, enjoying the quietude and peace he so 
justly deserves. On Feb. 2, 1894, he was married to Mrs. Alice 
(Moore) Shute, born in Wayne township, in August, 1849,. at the 
time of her marriage the widow of Albert C. Shute. deceased. By 
her first marriage Mrs. Webb became the mother of three children: 
Gertrude is deceased; Ollie resides at the parental home, and Maud 
is the wife of Charles Darland, of Richmond. In his political be- 
lief Mr. Webb is a Republican, and he is a devout Baptist, his wife 
being a member of the Friends' church. 



6(">2 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

David F. Dillman, a prominent farmer of Wayne township, was 
born in Preble county, Ohio, April 26, 1847, son of Joseph and Julia 
(Kreigo) Dillman, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of 
Preble county, Ohio. The father was a cooper by trade and. com- 
ing from Virginia to Ohio, followed that occupation in Preble 
county for man}' years. Later in life he engaged in farming and 
continued to reside in Preble count}- until his death, lie and his 
-ood wife were the parents of eleven children: Adeline is the wile 
of William Brown, of Preble county, Ohio; Henry C. resides in 
Preble count}-; David P. is the next in order of hi it'll ; Louis X. re- 
sides in Chicago; LurtOn I), resides in Connersville, Ind.; James N. 
is deceased ; William C. resides in Preble county, Ohio; Martha E. 
is deceased ; Laura A. resides in Dayton, Ohio; Emma R. is de- 
ceased; and Elizabeth is the wife of James Bell, of Preble county, 
Ohio'. David F. Dillman received a very limited education, attend- 
ing the district schools of the native count}-, and early became a 
valuable assistant to his father in the operation of his farm. Me 
remained at home until the age of twenty-one years, when he rented 
a. farm in Preble count}-, Ohio, and rented land about fifteen years. 
f-Ie then purchased a farm in Randolph count}-. Indiana, where he 
lesided six years, and then moved to Darke county, Ohio. After a 
residence of eight months in the last named county he purchased 
the farm of sixty-two acres where he resides, and carries on a gen- 
eral farming business. In politics Mr. Dillman gives allegiance to 
the Republican part}'. On Jan. 11, 1872, he was married to Anna D. 
Borodaile, born in Preble county, Ohio. Dec. <), 1852. daughter of 
William and Priscilla (Brown) Borodaile, the former a native of 
New Jersey and the latter of Preble county, Ohio. In early life the 
father was a blacksmith, but later became a farmer. Fie came to 
( >hio as a young man, was married there, and he and his wife con- 
tinued to reside in the house where the latter was born until their 
deaths. To Mr. and Mrs. Dillman were born two children: Lora 
is the wife of Martin Eikenbury, a farmer of Preble county, Ohio; 
and Taylor resides with his parents. To the parents of Mrs. Dili- 
man were born seven children: Clayton resides in Preble county, 
tlia is deceased; Mrs. Dillman is the next in order of 
1 is deceased; Edward resides in Union count}-, Indiana; 
i wife of William C. Dillman, a brother of David P., of 
Preble count}-, Ohio; and one child died in infancy. The father of 
Mr. Dillman served as a soldier in the war of 1812. 

John Frederick Bullerdick, a worth}- representative of those 
citizens of intelligence and industry which Wayne count}' lias con- 
tributed to Indiana, was born on South Fifth street, in the city of 
Richmond, Nov. 25. [854. He is a son of David and Ellen (Schultz) 
Bullerdick, born in Hanover, Germany, the father on May 2, 1832, 
and the mother about 1838. When a mere boy the father came to 
America and first secured employment at cutting wood for Ben- 
jamin Baurmer. In speaking of those days in later life he said that 
man}' a time he sat on a log and cried, wishing he was back in Ger- 
many, lie finally learned the shoemaker's trade and followed that 
occupation a number of years. After his marriage he removed 



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DIOGUAl'II K'AI. 663 

west of Indianapolis, but later returned to Wayne county and pur- 
chased a farm north of Chester. About 1861 he sold this farm and 
removed to Richmond, where he owned a residence property on 
South Fourth street and there resided until his death, lie died 
in April, 1909, and his wife passed away in August, 1897. 'bey were 
the parents of nine children: John F. is the eldest; Louisa and 
Cora are deceased; Alary resides in Cincinnati, Ohio; Henry C. re- 
sides in Richmond; Anna is deceased; George R. resides in Rich- 
mond; Lida is the wife of Christopher Swartz, of Cincinnati, Ohio; 
and Edward is in the hotel business at El Paso, Tex. John F. liuller- 
dick received his educational training in the schools of Chester and 
Richmond, lie lived with his parents until twenly-one years of 
age, upon which natal day his father gave him a part) and oyster 
supper in celebration of the event, llis father purchased a gro- 
cery store on South Eleventh street ami John F. was employed 
therein three years, at the end of which peril id he removed to his 
father's farm, which he operated on shares about two years, lie 
then purchased forty acres, lying across the road from his father's 
place, and a year later sold that tract and purchased the farm which 
is now owned by Mrs. Henry llartman. Three years later he sold 
that farm and returned to the old home place, where he resided until 
he purchased lite one where he lives, lie is the owner of 1.60 acres 
of finely improved land and is engaged in general farming. Here 
he expects to spend the remainder of his life in his comfortable and 
pleasant home, where he and his faithful helpmeet enjoy the fruits 
nf those many years of toil and endeavor, when by diligence and 
industry the)- acquired their valuable property. On Oct. 31, 1879, 
was celebrated the marriage of John F. Bullerdick to Miss Mary 
Mennie Fangman, born in Germany, Aug. 28, 1858. She came to 
America in about i860 or 1861, with her parents, who located in 
Cincinnati, where the father engaged in the gardening business, in 
which he continued until his death. The mother died in Wayne 
county, Indiana, in July, 1907. To John F. and Mary F. Bullerdick 
were born six children: Walter F., born Sept. 8, 1880, married 
Elizabeth Stewart, has a daughter, Luc'ile, and resides in the city 
of Richmond; Ilarry E., bom March 26, 1882, married Anna Borton, 
has one child, Sherman, and is engaged in the grocery business in 
Richmond; Flora, 'born Jan. 28, 1884, is the wife of Charles Roup, 
a farmer, near Middleburg, Wayne county, and they have two 
children — Alice and Clarence; Charles, born March 26, 1886, mar- 
ried Maude Trimble and resides on the old home farm; Roy, born 
Jan. i8, 1804, resides at the parental home, as does also Ruth, born 
March 8, 1898. Mr. Rullerdick's political affiliations are with the 
Democratic party, and he and his wife are devout members of the 
First English Lutheran Church in Richmond. 

Isaac N. Hanna is the owner of one of the most nicely im- 
proved residence properties in Wayne township and his success in 
life has been due to a more than ordinary native ability, coupled 
with a determination that never quailed in the presence of serious 
obstacles, lie was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, July, 17, 
1832, a son of Charles and Elizabeth (Martin) llanna. The father 



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664 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

was born in Baltimore, Md., the date of his birth being Sept. 4, 
1800, and the mother was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, 
in 1803. The father was a chairmaker during the greater part of 
his active career. The paternal grandfather, Caleb iianna, removed 
his family from Baltimore to Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where 
he spent the residue of his life, and there Charles llanna learned 
his trade, lie continued to reside there until [852, when he removed 
his family to Adams County, Indiana, and there died, in 1854. After 
his death his widow removed to Fort Recovery, Mercer count), 
Ohio, and there died in February, l88y. To them were born seven 
children: William, who died in Chicago in 1910, served a term of 
eighteen months as a soldier in the Fifth Ohio cavalry, in the Civil 
war; Isaac X. is the second in order of birth; Sarah Anna and 
FJliza'beth are deceased; Charles served two years as a soldier in 
Civil war, and was killed by guer- 
served with the Thirty-seventh In- 
>i the regiment, and died in hospital 
n, win 1 resides in Clarendon, Ark., 
served a term of eighteen months 
: X. llanna attended the common 
ntinued to make his home with his 
estate. But h may be said that he 
ireer at the age of fourteen year.-,, 
when he commenced working for others, giving his father one-half 
of his earnings. Thus he continued about five years and then 
learned the cabinet-maker's trade, in Jay county, Indiana, the famih 
then living just across the line in Adams count)'. 1'lis brother, Wil- 
liam, was also a cabinet-maker, and they worked together in New 
Corydon, Ind., until the breaking out of the Civil war, when, Sept. 
18, 186], Isaac N. enlisted in Company B of the Thirty-fourth In- 
diana infantry, as a private, being almost immediately advanced to 
sergeant, and served on detail duties the greater part of his term 
of service. This regiment was recruited at Anderson and was mus- 
tered in Sept. 16, 1861. It was in camp at Jeffersonville until Nov. 
15, when it proceeded to New Haven, Ky., where it remained until 
Dec. 14, and then marched to Camp Wickliffe. On Feb. 7, 
i8bj, it moved to the Green river, and on the 14th to the Ohio river, 
Where it took transports to Cairo, marching from there to New 
Madrid. It was in the siege of the latter place and then moved to 
St. Men-weather's Landing, where two 32-pound siege guns were 
placed in position. The regiment was attacked by seven gun-boats 
on the l6th, but compelled them to withdraw. This battery cut 
off the retreat from Island No. 10, and led to its subsequent capture. 
The regiment garrisoned New Madrid from- April 7 to June 14, 
aided in the capture of Fort Pillow, and then moved to Memphis 
and joined Colonel Fitch's command for the Whit e Ri\cr cam- 
paign. It engaged the enemy at Aberdeen, drawing him to Devall's 
Bluff, ami was at Helena during the fall and winter of 1862-63, en- 
gaging in frequent expeditions, including the clearing of Yazoo 
Pass, which the enemy had filled with heavy timber. The regiment 
was assigned to Hovey's division, Thirteenth corps, and took part 



BIOGRAPHICAL 665 

in the Vicksburg campaign. It was in the engagement at Fort Gib- 
son, making a charge and capturing two field pieces and forty-nine 
prisoners; was at Champion's Hill, where it captured the Forty- 
sixth Alabama, with its colors and held officers; was in the siege of 
Vicksburg until the surrender and was then engaged at Jackson. 
It was then ordered to New Orleans, where it remained from Aug. 
_| until Sept. 12, then moved to Brashear City, took part in the 
Teche Expedition as far as ( )pelousas, was engaged at Carrion Crow 
Bayou, and was at Xew Iberia until Dec. 10. On Dec. 23 the regi- 
ment look ship for 1'ass Cavallo, Tex., reaching there Jan. 8, 1864, 
and remaining until Feb. 21. It returned to Xew Orleans and on 
.March 20 left for home on furlough, Mr, lianna being mustered out 
at Indianapolis, .May 18. 18G4. lie then joined his mother at Fort 
Recovery, Ohio, where she had moved to in the meantime, and en- 
gaged in cabinet-making until 1895; also conducting an undertaking 
business there twenty-five years. In [895 he came to Richmond. 
built a home on the West Side, and there resided until the fall of 
KJ07, when he purchased the place of live and one-half acres, where 
he resides, practically retired. Mr. lianna takes an intelligent in- 
terest in public affairs, and politically, though naturally an adherent 
of the Republican part}', is quite independent in his views and ex- 
ercises his right of franchise in a way that he deems for the best 
interests of the country. On Feb. 15, 1S77, Mr. lianna was mar- 
ried to Miss Anna'Missouri Fisher, born near Gettysburg, Pa., July 
14, 1853, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Fisher. Of this union 
were born three children: Ernest is division engineer on the Iron 
Mountain railroad and resides in Aurora, Mo.; Thomas A. died 
Aug. 3, 1909; and F.lsie E. is the wife of Roy \V. Thomas, of Rich- 
mond. The parents of Mrs. lianna — Thomas Fisher and wife -are 
both deceased, and were born in Maryland. They came to Indiana 
in 1863 and located south of Richmond, where they resided until 
1872, and then removed to Mercer county, Ohio, locating near Will- 
shire. They remained there until about 1878, when they returned 
to Wayne county and spent the residue of their lives on their farm 
south oi Richmond. They were the parents of five children: Sarah 
Elizabeth is the wife of Joseph O. King, of West Richmond; Mrs. 
lianna is the second in order of birth; Booth is deceased; Howard 
is a passenger conductor on the Pennsylvania railroad and resides 
at Logansport, fnd.; and one died in childhood. 

Daniel Webster Harris, an enterprising and progressive farmer 
of Clay township, was born on a farm near Parker, in Randolph 
count)', Indiana, Dec. 18, 1849. He is a son of Milton R. and Ma- 
tilda (Bradbury) Harris, born in Wayne county, the father in 
Green and the mother in Clay township. In early life the father was 
a farmer and merchant, engaging in the latter occupation at Parker, 
where he also operated a farm. About 1855 he removed to Clay 
township, in Wayne county, locating on the farm where his son, 
Daniel W„ resides, and soon thereafter engaged in the mercantile 
business at Green's Fork. He retained his interest in the store in 
Randolph county until some years later, and then disposed of his 
mercantile interests and confined his efforts to farming. About 



666 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

1873 he disposed of his real estate, Daniel W. purchasing the home 
farm, and removed to Delaware county, locating near Cowan, where 
he re-engaged in farming and also the mercantile business, resid- 
ing there until the time of his demise, about 1892, his wife having 
died about 1870. During the latter part of his life the father was 
also a minister of the Gospel, belonging to the United Brethren de- 
nomination, lie and his good wife were the parents of nine chil- 
dren: Corwin died in childhood, as did also Sarilda Jane; Daniel 
\V. is the third in order of birth; Laura is the wife of Aaron Swear- 
ingen, engaged in fruit growing in the Stale of Washington; Clara 
is the wife of Samuel Wright, a farmer in Delaware county, In- 
diana; Alary is the wife of Benjamin F. Ilerrald, of Muncie, Ind. ; 
James W. is a farmer and resides near Cowan, Delaware county, 
Indiana; Moses F. is a farmer and resides near Houston, Tex.; and 
Leota A. is the wile of Herman Carmichael, a farmer near Muncie, 
in Delaware county, Indiana. Daniel W. Harris first attended 
school at barker (at that time called Morristown) and later at 
Sugar Grove, in Clay township, the schoolhouse being located on 
the farm which be now owns, lie lived with his parents until his 
majority and then went to Illinois, where he worked one season for 
others, lie returned home in the winter of 1871-7-', and resided with 
his parents until about one year after he was married, lie then 
rented the farm from his father about live years, at the end of which 
time lie purchased the homestead where he has since resided. Il 
is one of the best equipped and most modernly improved farms in 
the vicinity and has been worked to a high degree of efficiency. Mr. 
Harris has added to his real estate holdings and owns 1,350 acres, 
350 acres of which is in Henry count v. lie is president of the First 
National bank at Green's Fork, operates a general elevator and 
grain business, and is also engaged in the poultry and produce busi- 
ness, doing live stock shipping, etc., and is prepared to buy prac- 
tically anything the farm can produce. He intends to make this 
place a permanent home and has made all his improvements with 
that end in view. Mr. Harris' success has been the result of his 
own personal effort, for by the practice of thrift and economy, by 
ceaseless labor and unlimited courage, he has risen to a position of 
affluence. Although he has been stanch in his allegiance to the men 
ami measures of the Republican party he has never sought public 
preferment for himself. On April 2j, 1872, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Harris and Miss Lusetta J. Hall, born near Terre 
Haute, Ind., in February, 1851, daughter of William and Mary 
( Smith 1 Hall. Mr. Hall was born in England. He was twice mar- 
ried, bis first wife having died in England, and he brought the chil- 
dren of that union with him when he came to America. He became 
a resident of Vigo count}', Indiana, and there was married to Miss 
Mary Smith, a native of the State of Ohio. She died about 1X85 
and her husband followed her to eternal rest, about 1890. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris have eight children: Walter M. is a farmer and resides 
in Webster township; Mary is the wife of P. P. Morrey, a farmer 
residing west of Williamsburg; William C. is a farmer and resides 
northwest of Green's Fork; Frank A. is a farmer and stock-dealer 



BIOGRAPHICAL 667 

and resides at New Castle; Oletha is the wife of Albert Atkinson, a 
farmer residing- two and a half miles north of Economy; Benjamin 
is in the United States service; and Lulu M. is the wife of Omer 
Oler, a farmer residing two miles south of Economy. Mr. Harris 
is a member of the United Brethren church. 

William Herman Hartman is one of the most highly esteemed 
citizens of Wayne township, living a life devoted to deeds of use- 
fulness, lie was burn in Osnaburg, Germany, March 1 i 7 1882, a son 
of Fred John and Anna (Bullerdick) llartman, natives of the Fa- 
therland. The father was born July 3, 1825, and the mother on 
April 25 of the same year. They migrated to America in 1S88, 
coming direct to Richmond, and resided on a farm in Wayne town- 
ship about one year, after which they removed to the city of Rich- 
mond, where the father died in 1803 and the mother on Dec. 21, 
1890. They were the parents of seven children: Henry was the 
first burn; Louis resides on the Liberty pike, south of Richmond; 
Louisa is the wife of Henry F. Kehlenbrink, of Richmond; William 
11. is the next in order of birth ; August resides in Richmond ; Fred- 
erick resides southeast of Richmond, on the Fairmount pike; and 
Mar}' is deceased. William I 1. 1 lartman attended the schools in his 
native land as opportunity afforded, but quite early in life it was 
necessary for him to engage in remunerative employment. When 
fourteen years old he secured employment as a waiter and was so 
engaged about three. years, after which he worked as a teamster 
about one year. He then was employed by a gardener about one 
year, and when twenty years old was compelled to enter the Ger- 
man army and served as a soldier from 1882 to 18X5. After leaving 
the army he remained with his parents about three years, and then 
the family came to America, landing in Richmond, Sept. 1, 1S88. 
Here the son first worked for a cousin about six weeks, after which 
he secured employment in the tanner)- of Stephen R. Wiggins, 
where he worked about two years. He was then employed in the 
Hoosier Drill Works until 1892, when he engaged with his brother 
Henry in the dairy business three years. He then rented Henry 
l'.ullerdick's farm three years, at the end of which lime he pur- 
chased the farm of 138 acres where he resides and began the im- 
provement of the same. His farm is fairly improved and equipped, 
and it must be a source of gratification to Mr. Hartman to be thus 
surrounded by the comforts of life and to fully realize that they are 
the fruits of his own honest efforts. His time is devoted almost ex- 
clusively to the dairy business, and he keeps about thirty head of 
dairy cattle, besides raising hogs and operating his farm in a general 
way. On April 10, 1891, Mr. llartman was married to Miss Mary 
llelmich, born in Germany May 29, 1866, daughter of John and 
Katharine (Hesse) Helmich. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Hartman 
was blessed by the birth of eight children: Fred J., Feb. 11, 1892; 
Carl 11., Jan. 27, 1894; Harry J., Oct. 31), 1896; Edwin A., Sept. 16, 
1898; Albert L., July 3, 1900; Flsie L., Jan. 7, 1903; Theodore A., 
Sept. 7, 1904; and August A., Aug. 9, 1910. The parents of Mrs. 
William IT. llartman — John and Katharine (Hesse) Helmich — were 
natives of Germany. The father was a farmer and followed that 



668 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

occupation during all the years of his active life. There were seven 
children in their family and Airs. Hart man is the youngest. She 
came to America the same year as did her husband, coining direct 
to Richmond, and worked for others until married. Mr. liartman 
and wife are members of St. Paul's German Lutheran Church in 
Richmond, and in politics he is independent. 

Daniel C. Moore, a prosperous citizen of Green's Fork, was 
born in what is now Andrews, Huntington county, Indiana, Sept. 
30, 1875. He is a son of George A. and Melissa J. (Small) Moore, 
natives of Indiana, 'the father is of Scotch and German descent 
and was born on a farm about five miles south of Farmland, in Ran- 
dolph county, and the mother is of French and English descent and 
was bom one and one-half miles south of Andrews. The father 
learned the carpenter's trade at eighteen years of age, in St. Louis, 
working four years with his brother, a skilled mechanic, lie then 
returned to Indiana and has since resided in Randolph county, with 
the exception of about four years, which he spent in Kansas. He be- 
came a contractor and during the last five years of his active career 
had the management of a lumber yard at Modoc, lnd., where he 
and his wife live retired. They are the parents of four children: 
Daniel C. is the eldest ; Bonnie and Grace are twins, the former 
being the wife of Silas Miller, a farmer near Carlos, lnd., and the 
latter is the wife of Arlie Wood, a farmer residing about five miles 
west of Ridgeville; and II. Lloyd resides with his parents. Daniel 
C. Moore received his education in various country schools, attend- 
ing until twelve years old the Genesco (Kan.) Grammar School, and 
later the Modoc (lnd.) High School and the Angola College, and 
still later took a course in a business college in Indianapolis. \t 
the age of thirteen years he worked as a hired man on a farm and 
thus continued until he was about twenty-one. At this time he suf- 
fered a sunstroke while working in a harvest field and for about 
eighteen months was unable to do anything, lie attended school 
in the following winter and later obtained a license and began teach- 
ing, lie continued teaching in winter and attending school in sum- 
mer about live years, and then organized the Citizens' Bank at 
Modoc, hid., becoming its cashier. He remained in this position 
until May _'8, 1904, when he disposed of his interests in that place 
and removed to Green's Fork, where he is the cashier of the First 
National Hank, of which Daniel W. Harris is president. Mr. Moore 
is also an officer in the bank at Economy, which institution is known 
as the Northern Wayne Lank, and he served as a vice-president 
of the Indiana Bankers' Association in 1908. On Sept. 20, 1905, 
Mr. Moore was married to Miss Ethal Mills, born one-half mile 
south of Huntsville, lnd., Nov. 29, 1878, daughter of John A. and 
Ida B. (Gordon) Mills. John A. Mills, father of Mrs. Moore, is 
of English-Irish descent and is a farmer by occupation, residing 
near Huntsville, lnd. He and his good wife are the parents of six- 
daughters: Ada is the wife of I. J. Farquhar, a farmer and stock- 
raiser' residing nine miles southwest of Winchester; Mrs. Moore is 
the second in order of birth; Garnet is the wdfe of John Shores, of 
Muncie, lnd.; Marie is the wife of Glen Batchelor, of Winchester, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 669 

and Eunice and Elizabeth reside at the parental home. Mrs. Moore 
was a teacher for twelve years, beginning at her home town when 
seventeen years old, and taught there two consecutive years. She 
is now teaching in the Green's Fork High School, not being content 
to give up the profession. She is a member of two local ladies' lit- 
erary societies. Mr. Moore is a member of the Elks lodge at Rich- 
mond, the Knights of Pythias at Modoc, the Masonic lodge at 
Hagerstown, Xo. 49, ami the Knights of the Khorassan at Muncie. 

Fred W. Kienzle, a successful practicing physician at Green's 
Fork, was born at, Madison, lnd., Aug. 15, 1873. His parents — 
Charles and Elizabeth (Muth) Kienzle — are natives of the Father- 
land, born, respectively, March 29, 1839, a "d J r:ne 29, 1838. The 
father learned the shoemaker's trade in his native land and in 1858 
came to America. He settled first at Columbus, Ohio, where in 
company with his brother he followed his trade for live or six years. 
At t lie end of that time he removed to Madison, lnd., where he fol- 
lowed his trade until 1877, when he removed to Warfield, Switzer- 
land county, Indiana, where he resided until 1902. He then came 
to Green's Fork, where he has since resided practically retired. The 
mother of Dr. Kienzle came to America the same year as did her 
husband and was a resident of Madison, lnd., at the time of her mar- 
riage. Four children were born to these parents: Albert E. is a 
merchant in Oklahoma City, Okla, ; Fred W. is the second in order 
of birth; Charles is a merchant at Green's Fork; and Isabelle is a 
teacher in the Green's Fork school. The father served a ninety-day 
enlistment in an Ohio infantry regiment in the Civil war. Fred W. 
Kienzle first attended school at Warfield, lnd.; later was a student 
in a college at Hanover, lnd.; was a student two years in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, and then, after two years devoted to teaching, 
spent three years in a medical college at Louisville, Ky., and one 
year at the Indiana Medical College. After completing the high 
school course at Warfield he spent two years in college, the money 
being furnished him by Robert Scott, a friend with whom he had 
lived the most of the time from six years of age. After completing 
his school work he spent the winter seasons teaching and the sum- 
mer seasons working on Mr. Scott's farm at Warfield. He also read 
medicine with Dr. Culbertson at Moorefield, lnd. In 1902 he came 
to Green's Fork and has since been engaged in the practice of his 
profession at that place. In the matter of politics he espouses the 
cause of the Republican party, but the only office which he has 
ever held is that of trustee of Clay township, a position he is now 
filling to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Green's Fork, and professionally lias membership in the 
Wayne county, the Cnion District and the State Medical societies. 

William Ellis, a resident of the village of Green's Fork, en- 
gaged in the grocery and meat business, pursuing a life of intense 
activity, was born in that village, Feb. r4, 1884. His parents are 
natives of the same place. The father, John F. Ellis, in early life 
worked for others as a farm hand and also was for a time an em- 
ploye on the railroad. He then engaged at the blacksmith trade, 



670 MEMOIRS OF VVAYNK COUNTY 

becoming- a property owner, but throughout the greater part of his 
active life was engaged in railroad work. He is now living retired 
in the village of Green's Fork. He was born Now 18, 1849, aru -l n ' s 
wife, Ella (Welsh) Ellis, was born about 1853. William Ellis is one 
of a family of six children, all living. Their names are here set forth 
iu order of their birth: William is the eldest; Alary resides at the 
parental home; Julia is the wife of Raymond Swallow, cashier of 
the bank at Economy; and John, Susan, and Charles Frances reside 
at the parental home. William Ellis received his preliminary edu- 
cation at the village schools of Green's Fork. After leaving school 
he worked on the railroad at construction work, at intervals, and 
also was employed in the poultry house at Green's Fork for a time. 
About [905 he began work as a grocery clerk and on Jan. 1, 10.07, 
engaged in the grocery and meat business for himself. In June, 
1908, he rented his present location and is operating a first-class 
grocery and meat market, neatly equipped and carrying a full line. 
In politics he is independent. On Oct. 1, 1908, was celebrated the 
nuptials of Air. Ellis and Miss Alary P. Quigley, born in Illinois. 
She is a daughter of Patrick and Anna ( Flatley) Quigley, natives of 
Ireland; They came to America when quite young and the father 
began life's labors as a farm hand, but later engaged in farming 
for himself and became a land-owner in Green township, Wayne 
county, removing to this county about 1887. He had previously 
been in this county before removing to Illinois. He is a resident 
of Green township, where he devotes his entire attention to his 
farm. Ten children were born to him and wife: Edward resides 
on the homestead; Thomas is deceased; Airs. Ellis is the next in 
order of birth; Frank is in the United States mail service at Rich- 
mond; William resides at the parental home; James is employed in 
Richmond; Joseph, John and Margaret reside at the parental home; 
and one child died in infancy. To Mr. Ellis and wife have been born 
three children: Mary Elizabeth, born July 4, L910, and Joseph and 
James, twins, bom Oct. 1, 1911. Air. 'Ellis attends St. Mary's Ro- 
man Catholic Church at Richmond. 

Albert R. Jones. — History and biography for the most part re- 
cord the lives of only those who have attained military, political. 
or literary distinction, or who in any other career have passed 
through extraordinary vicissitudes of fortune. The unostentatious 
routine of private life, although in the aggregate more important 
to the welfare' of the community, cannot, from its very nature, figure 
in the public annals. But the names of men who have distinguished 
themselves in their day and generation for the possession, in an 
eminent degree, of those qualities of character which mainly contrib- 
ute to the success of private life and to public stability, — of men who 
have been exemplary in all their personal and social relations, and 
enjoyed the esteem, respect and confidence of those around them, — 
ought not to be allowed to perish. Few can draw rules for their 
own guidance from the pages of Plutarch, but all are benefited by 
the delineation of those traits of character which find scope and ex- 
ercise in the common walks of life. Among the individuals qf this 
class is Albert R. [ones. His record is the account of a life which 



BIOGRAPHICAL 67 1 

is uneventful, indeed, as far as stirring incident or startling" adven- 
ture is concerned, yet is distinguished by the must substantial quali- 
ties of character. His life history exhibits a long and virtuous 
career of private industry, performed with moderation and crowned 
with success. It is the record of a well balanced mental and moral 
constitution, strongly marked by those traits of character which are 
of especial value in such a stale of society as exists in this country. 
Prominent in the business and financial circles of Wayne county 
stands Albert R. Jones, lie was born in Centerville, this county, 
Dec. 10, 1852, son of John and Harriet (Jones) Jones. Both parents 
were natives of Maryland, their birthplace having been near Taney- 
town, and they located in this county in [849 (see sketch of Alfred 
J. Lash-ley). Albert R. Jones received his education in the schools 
of Ceiiterville. Putting aside his text-books when sixteen years of 
age, he began his independent career by working on a brick yard 
and later was engaged in the cigar business at Centerville two or 
three years. He then learned telegraphy, which occupation he fol- 
lowed a few years in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, and 
was then made agent at Xew Madison. Ohio; Later, he served as 
agent at Centerville three years, at the end of which time he re- 
signed the position and became a bookkeeper, in an organ factory 
at the same place. A short lime afterward he returned to railroad 
work, as an operator, and was located at the Belt Railroad Crossing 
in Indianapolis two years. He was then employed in the office of 
Superintendent (dale, of the Rig Four, two years, at the end of which 
time his health failed and he resigned his position. Returning to 
Centerville, he engaged in the grain business about eight years, after 
which he accepted the position of deputy county auditor, in which 
capacity he served four years. He then had charge of the office of 
the American Steel Company, at Indianapolis, ten months, and this 
was followed by employment in the office of the American Tin- 
plate Company at Indianapolis, lie accompanied that office upon 
its removal to Chicago, but after a short time there was sent to 
Montpelier, Ind., to take charge of the office of one of the company's 
plants. He remained in Montpelier until the plant was disman- 
tled, three years later, and then went to Elwood and occupied a 
position in the company's office from 1900 to 1907. In the last named 
year he was chosen cashier of the First National Rank at llagers- 
town and has since occupied that position, being also a stockholder 
in the Union National Bank at Richmond, the Citizens' State Rank 
at Elwood, and other financial institutions, ddie stockholders of 
the bank at Hagerstown are numbered among the representative 
men of the locality and the business is conducted carefully and on 
a conservative basis, so that the institution well merits the popular 
support accorded it. Mr. Jones is a man of rare business judgment 
and is abreast of the times in all matters, and the growth of the 
bank with which he is connected is a tribute to his popularity and 
his high standing in the community. In politics Air. (ones accords 
a stalwart allegiance to the Democratic party. J le was twice elected 
trustee of Center township, besides having served as deputy county 
auditor, his tenure of which has already been noted, and in each 



672 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

office his record was one of able administration. Fraternally he was 
associated with the Knights of Pythias at Centerville, of which local 
organization he was a charter member, but at the present time is 
not actively affiliated with any organization. On Jan. i, 1885, Mr. 
Jones was united in marriage to Miss Emma Celeste Bond, whose 
death occurred Nov. 4, 1889. Two children were the issue of that 
union: Forrest B., engaged in the horse business in the West; and 
Mary Lucile, who resides with her grandfather, Abner D. Bond 
(see sketch). On Sept. 17, 1896, Mr. Jones was united in marriage 
to Fva M. Stuart, born at Urbana, Ohio, daughter of Samuel B. and 
Rebecca Stuart. Although Mr. Jones has led a busy life he has yet 
found time to devote to those interests which develop the intellect- 
ual and moral nature of man, living not to himself alone, but labor- 
ing to aid his fellow man. lie is charitable and benevolent and the 
poor and need}' seek not his aid in vain. It is no very rare thing 
for a poor boy in our country to become a prosperous man and oc- 
cupy a commanding position in the business world, but many who 
have fought their way from poverty to wealth, from obscurity to 
prominence, retain some marks and scars of the conflict. They are 
apt to be narrow and grasping, even if not sordid and unscrupulous 
Mr. Jones, however, is an instance of a man who has achieved suc- 
cess without paying the price at which it is so often bought, for his 
prosperity has not removed him farther from his fellow men, but 
has brought him into nearer and more intimate relations with them. 
"The more means he has had, the more he has done for those around 
him, and he is numbered among Wayne county's most prominent 
citizens. 

Matthew Henry Dill, deceased, for many years one of the 
prominent figures in the industrial life of the city of Richmond, 
was born in Centerville, Ind., Jan. 5, 1840, a son of Alexander C. 
and Jane Dill. The father was born in the State of Pennsylvania 
and the mother in Hamilton county, Ohio. They were married in 
Centerville, Oct. 30, 1838, and moved to Richmond in 1S54. Mat- 
thew Henry Dill was educated at an academy in Centerville and in 
the public schools of Richmond. He was fourteen years old when 
his parents removed to the last named place, and there became an 
apprentice to his father, who was engaged in the undertaking busi 
ness. For a time after attaining his majority he continued in busi- 
ness as an undertaker, but later became associated with Jesse M. 
Hutton and William P. Hutton, forming the manufacturing firm of 
J. M. Hutton & Company, one of the oldest concerns in Richmond. 
'Mr. Dill was secretary of that firm from 1871 to 1805, arid" then, 
upon the death of William P. Hutton, was elected to the presi- 
dency, in which position he served until his death, Jan. 20, 1906. 
lie was a man of great inherent ability, thrifty and industrious, 
and his efforts brought well merited results, lie was long identi- 
fied with other business activities in Richmond and in the com- 
mercial world was regarded as a keen man of affairs, honorable and 
true to his friends. Among the concerns in which he was finan- 
cially interested was the Richmond City Water Works, organized 
in 1884, and of this he was a director from 1886 to 1906, treasurer 




^sCt Xj- fOn 



BIOGRAPHICAL 673 

from 1895 to 1899, and president from 1S99 until his death, lie 
was also a member of the Hoard of Directors of the Earlham Ceme- 
tery Association from 1881, a trustee of St. Stephen's Hospital and 
of Keid .Memorial Hospital from January, 1899, to January, 1906, 
and a member of the Hoard of Directors and vice-president of the 
Art Association from 1899 until his death, lie was also a director 
of the Richmond Natural Gas Company. II is religious belief found 
expression by membership in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Richmond, of which he was trustee from 1888 to 1807 a "d an elder 
from 1897 to 190(1. He was a man of great kindness of heart, a 
loving and indulgent husband and father, upright, honorable and 
honest in all his dealings with his fellow men. 11 is death occurred 
in Pasadena, Cal., where he had gone about two weeks prior to his 
demise, lie had been a sufferer from what is known as hardening 
of the arteries for some time and his condition became so serious 
that his attending physician, Dr. II. 11. VVeist, advised him to go to 
California. Accordingly, accompanied by his wife and Dr. Weist, 
he went to Pasadena. After remaining with his patient in that 
place four days Dr. Weist returned home, and the following day 
Air. Dill was stricken with pneumonia. Jlis son, Howard A. Dill, 
received a telegram from Pasadena, stating that his lather was in a 
very precarious condition and left at once for his bedside. The trip 
across the continent was a veritable race with death, but the son 
arrived two days before his father's demise, which occurred as be- 
fore stated, Jan. 20, 1906. His remains arc interred in Earlham 
Cemetery at Richmond, (hi Sept. 23, 1862, was solemnized Air. 
Dill's marriage to Miss Emily L. I button, daughter of Jesse M. 
and Rebecca L. Hutton, and of this union were born three chil- 
dren — William P., president of the J. M. Hutton Company, casket 
manufacturers in Richmond; Howard A., treasurer and superin- 
tendent of the Richmond City Water Works; and Prank P., who 
died Oct. I, 1S92. Mr. Dill is survived by his two sons, his widow, 
who resides at 314 North Tenth street, and a sister, Mrs. Clara E. 
Malsby, also of Richmond. 

Benjamin F. Jewett. — A home of prayer, where by precept and 
example every intluence was brought to bear which would aid in 
rearing to manhood and womanhood children of integrity and 
honor, of usefulness and industry — such was the home of Parker 
and Mary Ann (Shear) Jewett, whose son, Benjamin F. Jewett, 
was born in Huntsville, Randolph county, Indiana, July 13, 1841. 
His father was a native of New Hampshire, born in 1809, and his 
mother was born in Ohio some years later. The father learned the 
blacksmith trade in his native State and later followed that occupa- 
tion in New York City and also in Cincinnati. He entered 240 acres 
of land near Huntsville, in Randolph county, Indiana, but some 
years later came to I lagerstown, where he purchased property and 
followed his trade until his death, in 1870, the mother of Benjamin 
P. having died in 1855. This worthy couple became the parents of 
seven children: George Washington is living retired in Hunting- 
ton; Benjamin F. is the second in order of birth; John J. is de- 
ceased; Rachel became the wife of James Personet, of Richmond, 



674 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

and is deceased; Isabel A. is the widow of Fred Weldon and resides 
in Michigan; Alary Frances became the wife of Riley Saulsbury, of 
near Economy, and is deceased; and Laura J. is the wife of John 
Doland, of New Paris, Ohio. After the death of the mother the 
father married Jane Bowen, of Wayne county, formerly of Pennsyl- 
vania, and of this union were born three children: Edward Parker 
is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and resides near 
Indianapolis; Alice is the wife of Lorenzo Farlow, of Franklin; and 
William died in infancy. Benjamin F. Jewett resided with his. par- 
ents and received the benefit of their careful and conscientious train- 
ing until eighteen years of age. lie received his educational train- 
ing in the schools of PLagerstown, but a few days after reaching the 
age of twenty years enlisted in Company B of the Nineteenth In- 
diana infantry for service in the Civil war. This regiment was or- 
ganized ami mustered in at Indianapolis, July 29, t86l. On Aug 
9 it joined the Army of the Potomac at Washington. Its first en- 
gagement was at Lewisville, Va., Sept. 11. It next fought at Falls 
Church, after which it went into quarters at Fort Craig, near Wash- 
ington. On March 10, 1862, it was attached to McDowell's (1st) 
corps, with which it moved toward Fredericksburg and then toward 
the Shenandoah Valley. It remained at Warrenton until Aug. 5, 
when it made a reconnoissance toward Spottsylvania Court House. 
It then joined General Pope's army and fought at Cedar Mountain 
and Gainesville. At the last named engagement but nineteen of 
Company B came out of the battle alive and Mr. Jewett was se- 
riously injured by a gunshot wound, which necessitated his dis- 
charge from the service. He then came home and attended school 
about three months, after which he engaged in blacksmithing, hav- 
ing previously learned the trade of his father, lie continued in this 
business until 1S94, when he disposed of his tools and has since 
officiated as the manager of the gas plant in Hagerstown. On Sept. 
28, 1865, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Nancy J. Williams, 
born in Montgomery county, Ohio, Jan. 27, 1844. She * s a daughter 
of George and Margaret (Fan-is) Williams, natives of Montgomery 
county, Ohio. George Williams was born about 1814, of Irish de- 
scent, and spent his entire life as a farmer in his native count)-. He 
is deceased, but his widow, born in iNi(>, survives and is a resident of 
Dayton, ( )hio. They became the parents of seven children : Wes- 
ley served as a soldier in the Civil war, contracting an illness from 
which he died soon after returning home; Mrs. Jewett is the second 
in order of birth ; Mary is the widow of William Pyles and resides 
at Louisburg; George is a resident of Dayton, Ohio; Sarah is the 
wddow of William Johnson and resides at Pyrmont, Ohio; and 
James Greeley and Doctor Franklin were twins, the former of whom 
is deceased and the latter resides near Logansport, Ind. Aside from 
his connection with the gas company Mr. Jewett is living, practic- 
ally retired in Hagerstown, where he expects to spend the remain- 
der (jf his life in quietude. Two children blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jewett: May Etta, born Aug. 1, i860, is the wife of Har- 
vey Ulrich, a blacksmith of Hagerstown, and they have two* chil 
dren— Ruth, born Aug. 6, 1891, wife of Perry L. llaladay, a tinner 



MOGRAPI11CAL 675. 

at Hagerstown; and Robert J., born Jan. 6, 1895. Margaret, born 
Feb. 15, 1869, is a stenographer at Muncie, lnd. Mr. Jewett's fra- 
ternal relations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Grand Army of the Republic, though he prefers the quiet enjoy- 
ment of his evenings at home with his family. In politics he is a 
Republican and casts his ballot for the candidate representing the 
principles and measures which, in his opinion, are best calculated 
to conserve the interests of the whole people. 

DeWitt Clinton Bond, who lived in (been township more than 
sixty-one years and who was highly respected in the community, 
was born at Williamsburg, Wayne county, May 7, 1840, of sturdy 
American parentage, lie was a son of Nathan 1. and Alary (Bal- 
lenger) Bond, the former born in North Carolina, Aug. 15, [816, 
and the latter was a native of Wayne county, Indiana. The father 
was a blacksmith by occupation, learning the trade when a boy, 
and worked at the same in Cincinnati and also at West Elkton, 
later coming to Wayne county, about 1835. lie first located in Rich- 
mond, but afterward removed to Fountain City and still later to 
Williamsburg. Finally he moved to a farm, one and one-half miles 
south of Williamsburg, and there erected a shop and wareroom and 
followed his occupation until compelled by old age to retire. Mis 
spn, DeWitt Clinton, operated the farm and the father resided with 
the son until the hitter's death. Airs. Bond, the son's widow, re- 
moved to Richmond in the fall of 1906, bringing the old gentleman 
with her, and he died at her residence, May 5, 1907. During the last 
twenty months of his life he was an invalid and unable to walk. 
The mother died in 1848, and they were the parents of five children : 
DeWitt Clinton was the eldest ; Sarah Ellen is deceased; Alwildie 
died in infancy; James is a blacksmith and resides in Williamsburg; 
and John Harvey is the youngest. The early training of DeWitt 
Clinton Bond was obtained in the schools of Williamsburg and the 
district schools in the country near by, but his decided inclination 
for agriculture led him to follow that great branch of industry, 
and he became a leader in agricultural circles. J lis mother died 
when he was eight years old and he then lived with an aunt in 
Williamsburg until his father married again, after which he lived 
with his father until he established a home for himself, lie then 
purchased a farm adjoining" that of his father, each of eiyhty acres, 
located on Green's Fork creek. Later he purchased his father's 
farm and continued to reside there until his death, which occurred 
Oct. 0, 1901. Mr. Bond was a very successful business man and 
built for himself a fine farmstead and prospered. In business he was 
careful and conservative and made many friends. On July 30, 1861, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy L., daughtei of John and 
Martha F. (Hollingsworth) Ball, of Clay township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ball were natives respectively of Virginia and North Carolina, fol- 
lowing farming, and were the parents of five children: Mary is 
the wife of George Roberts, a veteran of the Civil war; Julia Ann 
died in infancy; Mrs. Bond is the next in order of birth; David is 
living retired in West Richmond; and Amanda is the widow of 
Richard French and resides in West Richmond, with her daughter. 



UjG MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Mrs. Bond was born in Clay township, Wayne county, April 6, 
1848, and received her early education in the district schools of her 
locality. To her and her husband were born three children: Mary 
Ellen, born March 1, 1864, is the wife of Alpheus Baldwin, a farmer 
in Webster township; William A., born Aug. 19, 1866, is an attor- 
ney in Richmond; and Martha F., born July 18, 1887, resides with 
her mother. The father of Mrs. Bond was bom March 14, 1816, 
and her mother on Dec. 26, 1818. When a small boy the father 
started with his parents to Indiana, by the way of Tennessee, where 
they resided two years, and then came on to Wayne county, locat- 
ing about three miles north of Green's Fork. 

Horace Hoover, one of the leading citizens of Iiagerstown and 
a native of Carroll count}-, Indiana, was born Oct. 20, 181)4. He is 
a son of Jacob and Sally (Rhinehart) Hoover, the former born in 
Lancaster count)', Pennsylvania, July 28, 1827, and the latter in 
Henry county, Indiana, Jan. 6, 1831. The father came to Indiana 
when fourteen years old with his parents, who located in Henry 
county, where tile paternal grandfather, Frederick Hoover, became 
a land-owner and continued on the farm which was his rirst pur- 
chase until his death. Jacob Hoover continued a resident of Henry 
count)- until 1863, when he removed to Carroll countv. where ue be- 
came a land-owner and engaged in farming and resided until i8oc\. 
( )n April 4 of that year the family landed in Jefferson township, 
Wayne county, locating west of Hagerstown, where the father pur 
chased a farm of 167 acres and resided until his death, May -13, 
jijoo. He was a minister in the German Baptist church. His widow 
passed away April 26, KjoS. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren: Elias M.; Abraham; Jefferson; Amos, who died Oct. 27, 
1881 ; Samantha, who became the wife of John G. Allen, of Henry 
count)-, and died April 28, 1902; America Jane, the wife of George 
W. Smith; Horace; David and Daniel, twins, Daniel dying Oct. 
25, 1872; and Frank. Air. Hoover purchased his first farm in Lib- 
erty township, Henry count)', Indiana, in 1888. lie resided on this 
farm until November, 1908, the tract consisting of fifty-two acres, 
but he has added to this real-estate since until he now owns 350 
acres, all adjoining the original tract in Henry county. In 1908 he 
moved to Hagerstown, where he has since resided, being the presi- 
dent of the Citizens' State Bank. While a resident of Henry county 
he operated a threshing outfit eighteen years, a business which lie 
still adheres to, being most thorough in the operation of machinery. 
To his own perseverance and industry and the interest ami assist- 
ance given by his wife — Susan J. (Shafer) Hoover, to whom he was 
married Oct. 21,' 1883 — Mr. Hoover owes his excellent start in busi- 
ness life. They are the parents of two children: Ralph, born Feb. 
12. 1892, died Sept. 25, 1893; and Eva, born Jul)- 11, 1894. 

Charles N. Teeter is to be recognized in this work as one of 
the representative manufacturers of Hagerstown, and he has been 
a resident of Wayne county, only being absent for business reasons, 
since his birth, in Hagerstown, Dec. 15, 1870. His parents were 
Zachariah and Barbara (Hoover) Teeter, the former born 'in Ha- 
gerstown, Aug. 3, 1836. and the latter was a native of Pennsylvania. 



biograp,iiicai. Gyy 

The paternal grandfather was Abraham Teeter, who came from 
Pennsylvania, about 1823, and entered land in Jefferson township. 

Zachariah Teeter worked on his father's farm until about twenty- 
six years old and continued a resident of Jefferson township until 
his death, Jan. 24, 1906. Charles N. Teeter attended school in Dis- 
tricts Nos. 2 and 3, in Jefferson township, and spent one year in 
the Ilagerslown High School and one summer in the National 
Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. When thirteen years of 
age he began work as a farm hand and continued so employed three 
years, after which he worked one season in a flouring mill at lla- 
gerstown. He then attended school about one year, after which he 
taught school two winters, working at the carpenter trade in 11a- 
gerstown during the summer seasons. lie then entered the em- 
ploy of the Standard Bicycle Factory at Indianapolis, and in the 
spring of 1893 went to Muncie, where he had charge of a bicycle 
concern until the spring of 1894. l ie tnen moved to New Castle, 
where he designed what became known as the "Alcazar Bicycle." 
In the fall of the same year he went to Shelbyville and remained 
there until January, 1895, designing the Light Inspection Car, then 
called the "Railway Cycle," for general inspection work by railroad 
officials, bridge inspecting, etc. In the spring of 1895 ne organized 
a company for the manufacture of these cars, the organization com- 
prising members of the Teeter and Hartley families, with Charles 
N. Teeter as general superintendent and John II. Teeter as presi- 
dent. In the beginning the factory equipment consisted of a sec- 
ond-hand lathe and two second-hand drill presses. The factory 
was then located in what is now the north end of the east shop, 
with a floor space of about 50x60 feet dimensions. The first year 
forty-six cars were manufactured, but the factory now has a 
capacity of 500 cars per year. Attention is also devoted to the 
manufacture of gasoline motor cars, known as the "Teeter & Hart- 
ley Car." At one time they also engaged in the manufacture of 
stationery gas and gasoline engines and air compressers, but this 
bianch of the business was sold, in 1908, to the Standard Company 
at Richmond. The factory employs a force of from 100 to 125 
mechanics, with an office force of five people, the business not 
being of a nature requiring a large clerical force. Mr. Teeter is 
also interested in a large plantation in Mexico, now devoted to 
raising corn, but it is intended later to devote the land to the pro- 
duction of fiber and fruit, although the tract, consisting of 1,600 
acre-, is situated in the center of the oil district of Mexico. Mr. 
Teeter owns a tract of land in Arkansas, consisting of 2,000 acres, 
400 acres of which is under cultivation and devoted to the produc- 
tion of cotton. On Aug. 16. 1892, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Leora E. Nicholson, born at Franklin (now Nettle Creek), 
Tnd., July 23, 1871. She is a daughter of Thomas and Lucinda 
iMacy) Nicholson. They were of Carolina stock, the grandpar- 
ents coming to Indiana in an early day. The father always fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits, and he and his wife continued to re- 
side in Dalton township until their deaths, his course as a farmer 
being marked by thoroughness and skill, and as a citizen he was 



678 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

held in high regard. Their daughter, Mrs. Teeter, is one of two 
children born to them, and the other, Macy, resides at Melrose, 
Minn., where he has the position of district superintendent of the 
Great Northern railroad, having learned the railway business under 
the direction of James Hill and his sons. Mr. Teeter's success is 
the more gratifying since it represents the results of his own efforts 
and those of his faithful helpmeet, for he had no financial assist- 
ance whatever in making his start in life. To Mr. and- Mrs. Teeter 
have been born four children, whom the parents are offering the 
opportunity of must excellent educational advantages — Edison 
Lothair, Macy Orville, Donald Hartley, and Herman Clinton. Mr. 
Teeter's political affiliations are with the Republican party, and 
though he takes a loyal interest in public affairs has never mani- 
fested ambition for official preferment. He is a member of the 
First Church, Christian Science, at Boston, Mass. 

John H. Teeter, a thrifty and progressive citizen of 1 lagers- 
town, is a native of Wayne county, Indiana, having been born two 
miles north of Hagerstown, in Jefferson township, Nov. S, i860. 
He received his preliminary educational training in the schools of 
Districts Nos. 2 and 3, known as the "Teeter School" and the "Dun- 
kard School," in Jefferson township. He remained at home until 
twenty-one } ears old and then engaged with his father in the flour- 
ing mill at Hagerstown. He remained thus employed about three 
years and then went south in the interest of the Deering Binder 
Company, remaining in the State of Tennessee one year. Because 
of failing health, caused by being overheated in Nashville, he was 
incapacitated for business about three years. At the end of that 
period he engaged in the fire insurance business at Hagerstown 
and continued so employed until 1805, when he became associated 
with the Light Inspection Car Company, of which he is the presi- 
dent. Since that time he has devoted his entire attention to the 
interests of that manufacturing concern and is also interested with 
his brother, Charles N. Teeter, in the Mexico and Arkansas enter- 
prises (see sketch of Charles N. Teeter), he and his brother having 
the largest interest in those concerns. On Aug. 25, 1881, Mr. Teeter 
was married to Miss Katharine Rowe, born near Hagerstown, Md., 
ill September, 1850. She is a daughter of John and Lvdia (Brown) 
Rowe, the former born in Germany and the latter in Maryland, 
Feb. 13, 1834. Idie father immigrated to America when a young 
man and located in Baltimore. He was a musician and became con- 
nected with a band there, but later removed to Fredericksburg, 
Md., where his first wife, whom he had married in Germany, died. 
Of this first union there were eight children, five of whom are liv- 
ing: Adam is a farmer and resides in Jefferson township; Thomas 
is living retired in Huntington ; one daughter is the widow of Mar- 
tin Werking and resides in Hagerstown; another is the widow of 
David Werking and resides on a farm two miles west of that vil- 
lage; and Susan is the wife of David Rhodes, a retired farmer of 
Mooreland, Ind. Mrs. Teeter is one of eleven children born to her 
parents: Anna is the wife of Oliver W. Brown, a mechanic, of 
Hagerstown; Mrs. Teeter is the second in order of birth; Emma 



BIOGRAPHICAL 6/(J 

is the wife of Lloyd Williams, a machinist, of Indianapolis; Charles 
is a carpenter contractor and resides in Muncie ; lata is the wife of 
William Dolley, superintendent of the Ontario Orange Exchange, 
at Ontario, Cal. ; Rebecca is the wife of Louis Waltz, a grocer of 
Anderson; Oliver is a machinist and resides in Ilagerstown; Agnes 
is the wife of Sylvester Jessup, a grocer, of Anderson; Myrtle 
Adella is the wife of Arthur Champlain, a traveling salesman, of 
Anderson; William is an oil gauger for the Standard Oil Company 
and resides at Bradner, Ohio; and Elizabeth became the wife of 
Wayne Nicholson and is deceased. Mr. and Airs. Teeter are the 
parents of two children: Eva Irene, born Dec. 19, 1885, died Sept. 
25, 1889; anc ' Ralph R., born Aug. 17, 1890, is a senior at Brown 
University, preparing himself for a mechanical engineer. In poli- 
tics Air. Teeter is a Republican, but reserves for himself the right 
of independent views as to the men and measures which he will 
support, lie is a member of the Christian Science church. 

Dr. Charles I. Stctelmyer, physician and surgeon, and one of 
the leading citizens of Ilagerstown, was born in Wolfsville, Fred- 
erick county, Maryland, Sept. 7, 1859. Ui s parents — Frederick and 
Louisa (Schildtknecht) Stotelmyer — were born in that county. In 
early life the father worked at the carpenter trade, but later gave 
his entire attention to farming and is now living retired in his na- 
tive State, at the advanced age of eighty-four years, his wife hav- 
ing died there about 1900. To them were born ten children: Man- 
zella is deceased; Christopher Columbus is a chair-maker by occu- 
pation and resides near the old home in Maryland; Dr. Charles I. 
is the next in order of birth; William died in 1898; Marion died in 
1876, at the age of fourteen years; Rufus and Walter are farmers 
and reside in Maryland; Harlan is a teacher and also resides in that 
State; Lemuel is an ordained Lutheran minister, but at present is 
engaged in farming near Bethany, W. Va. ; and Daniel E. is con- 
nected with the United States navy at Newport News, Va. Dr. 
Stotelmyer received his preliminary education in the common 
schools of Maryland, also attended a normal school, and later 
entered the 1'niversity of Maryland, where he graduated in 1892, 
taking a clinical course in Johns Hopkins University. He began 
teaching school at the age of eighteen years and for eight years 
was engaged in that profession, lie then engaged in the newspaper 
business, officiating as editor three years, at the same time serving 
as postmaster by appointment of President Cleveland. Disposing 
of his newspaper, he took up the study of medicine, and after com- 
pleting his course came to Ilagerstown, in April, 1802, and there 
has since practiced his profession. He devotes his entire time to 
his profession, in which he enjoys a large practice. He has become 
a landowner in Jefferson township, having 100 acres of farm land, 
and in 1803 built the residence where he resides, a part of which is 
devoted to office use. Dr. Stotelmyer is a Democrat in polities and 
is trustee of Jefferson township, also occupying the position of 
health officer of the village of Ilagerstown. On Dec. 25, 1882, he 
was married to Miss Flien S. Hayes, born in Maryland in 1857, 
and died in January, 1886, leaving two children- Ona, who gra'd- 



680 MEMOIRS Of WAYNE COUNTY 

uated as a nurse in the Reicl Memorial Hospital and is employed in 
Richmond ; and Otho, who married Miss Ethel Ginn, resides at New 
Castle, and they have one child, Lucile, born in 1908. On Sept. 
7, 1892, Dr. Stotelmyer was married to Miss Sarah A. Brown, burn 
in Dalton township, this county, Aug. 12, 1870, daughter of Sam- 
uel H. and Margaret Ann (Fouts) Brown, the former of whom 
died in 1892, and the latter resides with her daughter, Mrs. Stotel- 
myer. Dr. Stotelmyer is a Past Grand in the local organization of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 25, and. also 
has membership in the Maccabees, the Woodmen, the Knights of 
Pythias, and the Masonic order. While residing in Maryland he 
was a member of the German Reformed church, but his affiliations 
are now with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

John M. Hartley, a successful citizen, now residing at [lagers- 
town, was born in the village of Millersville, Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, March 13, 1836, son of Josiah and Nancy Ann 
(Brady) Hartley. The father was born in Wilmington, Del., April 
13, 1804, and the mother in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, Sept. 
29, 1810. In early life the father learned the carpenter trade and 
as a young man went to Pennsylvania, where he was married. He 
came to Indiana in 1838 and located at Milton, Wayne count), 
where he continued to follow his trade until about 1856 or 1857. 
His wife having died there, March 26, 1852, a few years later he 
removed to Hancock county, Indiana, and located on a farm near 
Greenfield, where he followed agricultural pursuits and also worked 
at carpentering - , and later went to Kansas and resided with a daugh- 
ter at Horton until his death, March 9, 1887. He and his good wife 
were the parents of eight children: Joseph L. died in Madison, 
Ind., about 1900; John M. is the second in order of birth; Mary A. 
resides in Kansas City, Mo.; Harriet became the wife of Amos 
Cranford, of Knightstown, and died at Horton, Kan., March 24, 
1888; Henry C. died March 23, 1889; Josiah was wounded in the 
second battle of Bull Run and died a few days later; Elvira be- 
came the wife of Thomas Hanna and died May 4, 1900; and George 
AY. died in infancy. Joseph L., John M., Henry C. and Josiah all 
served as soldiers in the Civil war. John M. Hartley attended the 
schools of Milton, and after the death of his mother, in the spring 
of 1852, when sixteen years old, began learning the trade of cabinet 
maker, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then followed 
that trade until the breaking out of the Civil war, when he enlisted 
in Company E, Sixteenth Indiana infantry. This regiment was 
organized for State service at Richmond, in Maw 1861, for a one- 
year term, but when the news was received of the Bull Run disaster 
it was offered to and accepted by the General Government. It was 
mustered in July 23 and left the State the same day, being the first 
regiment to pass through Baltimore after the firing upon the Sixth 
Massachusetts, in April. It was assigned to Banks' army and sta- 
tioned in Pleasant Valley. It was attached to Abercrombie's brig- 
ade and in August moved to Hyattstown. It left there for Ball's 
Bluff, Oct. 20, reaching there the following morning, and went, into 
line of battle, taking part in the engagement that followed, and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 68 1 

detailed to cover the retreat on the 22d, being the last to recross 
the river. On Dec. 2 it moved to Frederick City, then to Harper's 
Ferry, and later to Winchester. It built a bridge across the Shen- 
andoah at Snicker's Ferry and was in various movements until 
Warrentown was reached, in April, 1862. The regiment was mus- 
tered out at Washington, May 14, 1862. Mr. Hartley enlisted in 
the service as a private, but was made a sergeant while yet in camp 
at Richmond and was commissioned second lieutenant of his com- 
pany after about five months' service, officiating in that capacity 
until the end of his term of enlistment. Later, in 18114, he raised a 
company at Knightstown for the One Hundred and Thirty-ninth 
Indiana infantry, and was made captain of his company, but at the 
organization of the regiment was commissioned lieutenant-colonel. 
This regiment was organized at Indianapolis in June, 1864. Lliza- 
ville, Lawrenceburg, Kendallville, Knightstown, Connersville, New 
Castle, Portland, and Yevay, each furnished one company, New 
Albany and Metamora, consolidated, furnished one, and Columbia 
City, New Haven and New Philadelphia furnished another. It was 
mustered in June 8, proceeding to Tennessee. It was mustered out 
in September, 1864. Returning to Knightstown, Mr. Hartley re- 
sumed work at his trade and in the fall of 1866 removed to 1 lagers- 
town, where he was employed at cabinet making and also took up 
carpenter work. Later he entered the employ of Peck & Stone- 
breaker as bookkeeper and continued in that position a period of 
seven years. He served two terms as township trustee, was post- 
master at Ha^erstown under President Harrison's administration, 
and has also served as town clerk and as a member of the school 
board. In January, 1895, he became the secretary and treasurer of 
the Light Inspection Car Company at llagerstown, at the time of 
the organization of that concern, and still continues in that capacity. 
His residence at Flagerstown is modern in every respect and so 
pleasantly located that Mr. Hartley has expressed his intention to 
pass his days there. In politics he is a Republican and an ardent 
worker for that party. On Jan. 31, 1858, was celebrated his union 
with Miss Amanda Macy, born at Manila, Rush county. Indiana, 
Jan. 6, 1840, daughter of John W. and Elvira (Coffin) Macy, natives 
of North Carolina. They came to Wayne count \ from Carthage, 
N. C, about 1854, and settled at Milton, where they resided until 
1858 and then moved to Andersonville, in Franklin count) - . Later 
they returned to Wayne county, in 1865, and located at Franklin, 
in Dalton township, where they lived practically retired until the 
death of the father, about 1868. The mother then resided with Mr. 
and Mrs. Hartley until her death. They were the parents of live 
children: Sebastian is deceased; Mrs. Hartley is the second in 
order of birth; Horatio enlisted as a soldier in the Fifty-second In- 
diana infantry, was taken with a severe cold at Memphis, was trans- 
ferred home and died at the residence of Mr. Hartley, in Knights- 
town; Mary E. is deceased; and Cordelia died in childhood. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Hartley were born two children: Laura A., born 
Nov. 11, 1858, is the widow of Isaac D. Hines and resides with 
her father. Charles H., born Nov. 17, 18C0, resides at Oshkosh, 



682 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Wis., in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. He 
started as an operator at Brookville, Ind., and rose from that posi- 
tion to train dispatcher. He then became chief dispatcher of a 
division on the Chicago & Northwestern railway and later super- 
intendent of the same (Ashland) division. He resigned this posi- 
tion about 1907 and, associating himself with a party of capitalists, 
is now promoting the construction of the new road, known as the 
Wisconsin & Northern, running from Oshkosh north into the min- 
ing regions. Colonel Hartley is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, in the local organization of which he has served 
as an officer fort)' years, and is also a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. His religious faith is expressed by membership 
in the Christian church. 

Dr. Eli H. Thurston, practicing physician, residing in the vil- 
lage of HagerstDwn, whose professional life has been eminently suc- 
cessful, is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Clarksville, Clin- 
ton county, Ohio, Sept. 11, 1848, son of William H. and Delilah 
(Miller) Thurston. His father was born near Jamestown, Va., May 
2, 1802, and his mother was a native of Ohio, born in Montgomery 
county, June 28, 1808. They were married Sept. 13, 1831. In 1809 
William H. Thurston came to Ohio with his parents, who landed 
at the mouth of Deer creek, within the present limits of the city 
of Cincinnati. The paternal grandfather, William Thurston, was 
a miller by occupation, and soon after coming to Ohio located on 
the Little Miami river and engaged in that occupation, continuing 
there until his death, in 1843. The father, William H. Thurston, 
also engaged in the milling business there and did a great deal of 
work for Governor Morrow, of Ohio. After a number of years at 
that place, where ten of his eleven children were born, he removed 
to Clarksville, Clinton county, where he engaged in the same occu- 
pation and was engaged in milling at three different places in that 
county. In 1856 he removed to Fayette count)', Ohio, later to 
Pickaway county, then returned to Fayette county, and still later 
removed to Highland county, Ohio, where he died May 21, 1873. 
He attained the age of seventy-one years and was in full possession 
of his faculties at the time of his death. Dr. Thurston is the 
Youngest of the eleven children born to his parents, lie attended 
school in Clinton count), Ohio, and later at Washington Court 
House, in Fayette county, and at the age of fifteen years learned 
the photographing business there, which occupation he followed 
two years. He then engaged in house painting until 1868, and in 
the summer of that year entered the Physio-Medical Institute at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating with the class of 1870, and having 
practiced his profession during the summer of 1869. After his 
graduation he located at Sabina, Ohio, hut in September, 1870, re- 
moved to Winchester, Randolph count)-, Indiana, where he prac- 
ticed his profession two years. He then removed to Ross county, 
Ohio, where he engaged in the practice of his profession until 1874, 
and then came to Jacksonburg, this county, where he remained until 
the spring of 1879, and then came ot Hagerstown, where he has 
since resided. In politics Dr. Thurston is a member of the Re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 683 

publican party and served as trustee of Jefferson township from the 
spring of 1888 to 1890. Socially, he is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and of the Masonic order. Starting in life with prac- 
tically no means, his frugality and industry have earned fur him a 
competence and his last days can be spent in contemplation of a 
life, busy and fruitful, his sunset time being cheered by the esteem 
of his fellowmen. On Aug. 18, 1870, was celebrated his marriage 
to Miss Nancy M. Day, born at Greenfield, Highland county, Ohio, 
May 2, 1843, and died Oct. 24, 191 1. She was a daughter of Thom- 
as L. Day (see sketch of Harvey J. Day). To Dr. and Mrs. Thurs- 
ton were bum four children: Helena Florence, bom at Winchester, 
Ind., Aug. 2j, 1871, died in 1902; Thomas, born July 28, 1874, re- 
sides at Eldorado, Alaska; Addie May, born Dec. 28, 1879, is the 
wife' of William Dingworth, a machinist, of near Tampico, Mexico; 
and Robert, burn July 8, 1882, married Miss Lela Wiggins and re- 
sides in Hagerstown. The eldest daughter was a prominent and 
pupular teacher in Hagerstown. 

Joel H. Stonecipher, one of the successful young business men 
of Hagerstown, was born in Jackson township, this county, Oct. 25, 
1875, son °f Alexander and Elizabeth (Hardman) Stonecipher, born 
in the same county and township. The father began farming for 
himself early in life, taking charge of the homestead, where he 
continued to reside twenty-five years after his marriage. About 
1890 his farm was disposed" of and he moved to Hagerstown, where 
he lives retired. His wife died on the old homestead, in Tackson 
township, in May, 1889. They were the parents of six children: 
Susan is deceased; Clinton E. is a farmer and resides in Jackson 
township; Joel II. is the next in order of birth; Sadie is a tailoress 
and at the present time is at Indianapolis, Ind.; Charles is a farmer 
and resides in Jackson township; and Lydia resides in Hagers- 
town. Joel H. Stonecipher attended school in Jackson and Jeffer- 
son townships and afterward the high school at Hagerstown, and 
resided at the parental home until the death of his mother. He 
then went to live with an uncle in Jackson township and re- 
mained there fourteen months. He then came to Hagerstown and 
secured a position as a drug clerk with the firm of Allen & Com- 
pany, with whom he remained about four years, afterward working 
on the farm of his uncle one year. His next employment was 
about six months in the carriage store of Harvey J. Day, and he 
then entered the employ of Mr. Hiner, who conducted the drug 
establishment which Mr. Stonecipher now owns. Six months later 
he entered a wholesale drug house in Indianapolis, where he re- 
mained about six months, and then went to Gas City, where he 
clerked in a drug store about three years. At the end of this 
period he went to Cambridge City, wdiere about six months he was 
employed as a drug clerk, and then four months was employed in 
the same capacity at Kokomo. He then returned to Hagerstown 
and entered the employ of Ward Brothers, who then conducted 
the establishment which Mr. Stonecipher now owns, and remained 
with them three years. He then opened a store of his own, but 
soon thereafter purchased the store of Ward Brothers, and this oc- 



684 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

cupies his time today. He enjoys a large patronage and his busi- 
ness is profitable. He carries a full line of drugs, stationery, 
paints, etc., and also a line of jewelry, doing general repair work 
in that line. In politics, Mr. Stonecipher is an ardent worker in 
and strong supporter of the Republican party. Socially he is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both of the 
Subordinate Lodge and the Encampment, and also has member- 
ship in the Knights of Pythias, being a second lieutenant in the 
Uniform Rank. He is the owner of some fine residence properties 
in Hagerstown and is one of the leading men of that thriving vil- 
lage. On Dec. 4, 1904, he was united in the holy bonds of matri- 
mony with Miss Shirley Prentice, born at Versailles, Ind., March 
4, 1885, and of this union has been born one child, Jean Prentice, 
Aug. 27, 1909. 

William M. Stahr, a prosperous and influential merchant of 
the village of Hagerstown, is a native of Wayne count)', born at 
Centerville, Sept. 26, 1874. He is a son of Louis P. and Minerva 
(Roosa) Stahr, the former born in Germany, in December, 1845, 
and the latter in Hamilton county, Ohio, March 3, 1854. The 
father came to America when about seventeen years old and first 
resided in New York City, lie went from there to New Orleans 
and thence to St. Louis. From there he came to Wayne county 
and located at Cambridge City, but later removed to Centerville, 
where he was married. He had learned the saddlery business in 
early life and followed that occupation in Centerville a number of 
years. He then removed to Richmond, where he followed the 
same occupation, and three or four years later removed to Pales- 
tine, Ohio, where he is still actively engaged in the saddlery busi- 
ness. His worth)' and highly regarded wife passed into eternity 
there, in Jul)-. 1910, the mother of five children: Elizabeth is the 
wife of George W. Jones, in the employ of the Stahr Hardware 
Company at Hagerstown, Ind.; William M. is the second in order 
of birth; Charles W. resides at Liberty; and Frank and Edward 
are deceased. William M. Stahr received his education at the old 
Se'vastopool school in Wayne count)' and in the schools at Pales- 
tine, Ohio. He continued to assist his father in his business until 
1892, when, upon attaining the age of eighteen years, he went to 
Richmond and worked at the harness business for C. A. Keys, 
with whom he remained eight years, lie then came to Hagers- 
town, where he was engaged in the harness business five years, 
after 'which he went to Greenville, Ohio, where he engaged in the 
same line of business about one year. He then returned to Ha- 
gerstown, where he has since been engaged in the hardware and 
furniture business, carrying a full line of both light and heavy 
hardware, furniture, agricultural implements, etc., his store being 
one of the neatest and best equipped in the county. In politics Mr. 
Stahr is a staunch adherent of the Democratic party, but has never 
aspired to a public career, preferring to devote his entire time and 
attention to his own business affairs, in fraternal circles he is 
prominently identified with the Free ami Accepted Masons^ the 
Knights of Pvthias, and the Modem Woodmen, having passed 



BIOGRAPHICAL 685 

through the chairs in each of the local organizations. In Novem- 
ber, 1893, at Palestine, Ohio, was solemnized his marriage to Miss 
Alice Browder, born in Montezuma, Ohio, Aug. 4, 1874, a daugh- 
ter of Hon. John H. and Charlotte (Metzgar) Browder, natives 
of Darke county, Ohio. Hon. John H. Browder has been a school 
teacher since early in life and is now serving his second term as a 
representative from Darke county in the Ohio legislature. He is 
also county school examiner for Darke county ami is interested 
with Mr. Stahr in the hitter's business at 1 lagerstown. The happy 
marital union of Mr. Stahr and wife has resulted in the birth of 
three children: Willard J., born June 16, 1896; Ilellen, born June 
jo, 1902; and Guy, born April 28, 1904. Mr. Stahr is a member 
of the Christian church. 

Harvey J. Day, a successful newspaper man of Hagerstown, 
was born at Iiillsboro, Ohio, Nov. 14, 1849. His parents — Thomas 
L. and Mary Jane (Truitt) Day — were natives respectively of New 
York City and Boss county, Ohio. In early life the father was 
employed on a line of passenger vessels plying between New York- 
City and Liverpool, and later was employed as a bookkeeper. Still 
later he removed to Washington Court House, Ohio, where he was 
engaged in the mercantile business during the Civil war and until 
he retired, about 1875. He then came to Wayne county and re- 
sided with his daughter, Mrs. Dr. Thurston, at Jacksonburg, a 
time, and later resided with his son, Harvey )., until his death, in 
1889, his wife having passed away in Ohio, about 1875. lie was 
a drummer boy in the war of 1812, and while living in Ohio filled 
various local offices — school trustee, deputy treasurer, etc. Har- 
vey J. Da)' is one of five children: Nancy M., deceased wife of Dr. 
Eli 11. Thurston (see sketch); Joseph served as a soldier in an 
Ohio regiment in the Civil war, receiving injuries from which he 
died a few years later; Harvey J. is the next in order of birth; 
Thomas is the inventor of an improved engraving process, to 
which he devotes his entire attention, and resides at Windfall, 
Ind. ; and John is a grocer and resides in Indianapolis. Harvey J. 
Day attended school at Washington Court House, Ohio, having 
previously attended country school to some extent. He remained 
with his parents and at the age of eighteen began working as a 
clerk in his father's mercantile establishment in Ohio. Later he 
learned the printing trade at Washington Court House and for a 
time conducted the paper while the editor was serving as a mem- 
ber of the Ohio legislature. At one time while working in that 
office he befriended a stranger who was seeking employment and 
who afterward became edilor-in-chief of the Cincinnati "Enquirer." 
Grateful to his benefactor, this gentleman offered Mr. Day any 
position on that paper that he might desire. Mr. Day expected to 
accept the kind offer, but, coming to Indiana to visit his sister, was 
taken ill, and while convalescing was prevailed upon to take charge 
of the paper which he is now editing in llageistown. lie came 
here in 1875 and later engaged in the grocery business, which he 
continued about seven years. He then disposed of his interests 
in that connection and devoted his attention to his newspaper and 



080 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

his farm land. Later he engaged in the vehicle business — wagons, 
buggies, etc., — which he still continues, in addition to his news- 
paper business. His paper is known as the "Hagerstown Expon- 
ent," and he has owned and edited it continuously since 1875. He 
also owns and operates a farm of 165 acres, located one and one- 
halt miles from the village, the same being well attended to, and 
the stock and equipment are well kept and in line condition. So- 
cially, Mr. Hay is a member of the Masonic order and of the Red 
Men. Politically he is a member of the Republican party. On 
Aug. 26, 1877, he was married to Rebecca Castator, a native of 
Hagerstown, daughter of Elijah Castator and wife, natives of 
Pennsylvania. Her father was a cabinet maker and undertaker 
who came to this county in early life ami followed that occupation 
in Hagerstown. his death occurring at the advanced age of ninety 
years. 

Thomas B. Allen, a retired farmer of Hagerstown, is a native 
of Jefferson township, born three miles southeast of Hagerstown, 
Dec -7, 1853- His father, Jacob Allen, was a native of (duo, hav- 
ing first beheld the light of day near Centerville, that State, June 
26, 1817, and the mother, Martha (Brown) Allen, was born on 
Walnut Level, near Jacksonburg, this county, Sept. 21, 1819. 
When but five years of age Jacob Allen came to Indiana with his 
parents, who located in Jefferson township, three miles southeast 
of Hagerstown, where his father, Hugh Allen, entered land The 
grandfather later purchased another farm about one mile from his 
first purchase and there died about 1852 or 1853. Jacob Allen con- 
tinued on the homestead, having purchased this farm from his 
father, and resided there until about 1892, when he moved to Ha- 
gerstown and lived in retirement until his death, May 26, 1900. His 
wife passed away Oct. 15, 1891. They were the parents of four 
children: John B. was a practicing physician at Cambridge City 
and died Feb. 19, 1910; Lewis C. died April 30, 1910; Caroline A. 
became the wife of George W. Fulkerson and died Sept. 4, 1907; 
and Thomas l'». is the youngest of the family and the only one liv- 
ing. Thomas B. Allen acquired his educational training in the 
public schools of Jefferson township and the village of Hagers- 
town, and commenced his independent career at the age of twenty- 
one b) renting the old homestead of his father. He purchased land 
in Blackford count>'. which tract he sold about ten years later, 
ami then purchased a farm southeast of Hagerstown, where he re- 
sided about fourteen years. He then removed to Hagerstown, on 
account of the ill health of his wife, buying a comfortable and im- 
posing residence, and has since resided here in practical retire- 
ment, lie is still the owner of 140 acres of land, a part of which 
is the old homestead which was entered by his grandfather. He 
is recognized as one of the thorough, substantial men of the village 
of Hagerstown. In his political affiliations he is a staunch adher- 
ent of the Democratic party and has served as secretary of the 
local school board. On Sept. 7, 1887, Mr. Allen was married to 
Miss Mar)' Hickman, born near Springport, in Henry county, Sept. 
7, 1861, a daughter of William and Susan ("Vance) Hickman, na- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 687 

tives of Henry county. The father was always a farmer and be- 
came a land owner in Henry county, where lie continued to reside 
until his death, Feb. 14, 1893, and his widow resides on the old 
homestead. Mrs. Allen died June 1, 1907, having' become the 
mother of a daughter, Ruth, born Sept. 7, 1891, a graduate of the 
Hagerstown High School with the class of [910. She resides with 
her father. 

John C. Nicholson, now living retired in the village of Ilagers- 
town, having served two terms as superintendent of the county 
infirmary, and prominent in fraternal organizations, is one of 
Wayne's native sons who has attained to pronounced success and 
prestige entirely through his own thrift and enterprise, lie first 
beheld the light' of day on the old Nicholson farm, one and one-half 
miles west of Green's Fork, March 28, 1843, a son ul James T. and 
Sarah (Veal) Nicholson, the former a native of the Old North 
State, born April 14, 1816, and the latter a native of New Jersey, 
born April 7, 1S18. James T. Nicholson was reared and educated 
in his native State and while yet in his 'teen^ came to Indiana with 
his parents, who located near Green's Fork, where they spent the 
residue of their lives, with the exception of a short time in fowa. 
James T. Nicholson continued on the old homestead and followed 
farming practically all of his life, lie was elected justice of the 
peace and settled estates, etc., for more than thirl \ years prior to 
his death, lie passed to his reward, |uly to, 1899, his wife having 
died May 28. 1886. John C. Nicholson is one of twelve children, 
among whom he ranks third in point of age, the others being: 
Rhoda, living retired at Green's Fork; Mary A. is the widow of 
Abiather Lamb and resides at Green's Fork; Flmire is a farmer 
and resides near Green's Fork; Martha became the wife of Arthur 
Frazier, of Indianapolis, and is deceased; George J. is a stock 
dealer and resides at Green's Fork; Rhodes 1). is a farmer and re- 
sides at Green's Fork; Louisa J. is the wife of Charles Heath and 
resides at Green's Fork ; Oscar A. is a farmer and resides at Green's 
Fork; Electa is the wife of James Bish, of Green's Fork; and two 
died in infancy. John C. Nicholson acquired his educational train- 
ing in the public schools of Clay township, and resided at home 
until past twenty years of age. He then rented land in Jefferson 
township a few years, after which he purchased a small farm one- 
half mile north of Hagerstown, where he resided a number of 
years, lie then moved into the village of llagerstown and engaged 
in the butcher business and the buying and shipping of stock six 
or eight years, at the end of which period he returned to his farm. 
A number of years later he sold this place and purchased a farm 
two and one-half miles north of Hagerstown, where he resided until 
appointed superintendent of the county infirmary, lie served two 
terms in this position and then again purchased the fust mentioned 
farm, but after residing there a short time sold that place and pur- 
chased a farm on Martindale creek. He also engaged in other real 
estate transactions, but continued his residence in Hagerstown 
until 1906, when he removed to Lafayette, where his grandson was, 
a student in Purdue University. He resided there three years and 



688 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

then returned to Hagerstown, where he has since lived retired, 
owning a number of residence properties which demand consider- 
able of his time and attention. In every capacity in which his busy 
career has placed him he has brought to the discharge of his duties 
capability and honesty, indispensable attributes in the large affairs 
of life. In politics he renders allegiance to the Republican party 
and has officiated as assessor of Jefferson township, though not an 
office seeker in the ordinary understanding of that term. In his 
fraternal relations Mr. Nicholson is admirably associated, being 
a member of Hagerstown Lodge, No. 49, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and he has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Heirosis Delpha Lodge, No. 25, since 1862. On Dec. 24, 
1863, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Nicholson to Miss Lu- 
anda C. Bell, born in Maryland, Sept. 24, 1843, a daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Smith) Bell, natives of Maryland, the for- 
mer horn April 23, 1816, and the latter, July 21, 1821. They were 
married Feb. 14, 1843, a »d came to Indiana in 1853, locating in Ha- 
gerstown. The father was a farmer and miller by occupation, he- 
came a land owner, and continued to reside in Hagerstown the 
residue of his life, although he died in Kansas, where he had gone 
to visit his children. 11 is death occurred Jan. 15, 1901, his wife 
having passed away Nov. 8, 1863. Of the happy union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nicholson were horn two children : Wildv Wayne, the eldest 
son, is a farmer and resides in Filer, Idaho, also owning land in 
the State of Washington. He was born Feb. 11, 1868, and has 
been twice married, first to Lissie Lowe, who died leaving" one 
child, Walter Hugh, horn April 18, 1887, who was reared by the 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson, from the age of three 
months, lie graduated at Purdue University with the class of 
1910 and is engaged in electrical engineering in Kansas City. The 
second wife of VYihlv W. Nicholson was Aria Thornburgh, and of 
this union have been born five children: Jesse W., born Dec. 3, 
1891 ; William F., Jan. 14, 1894; Walter, June 21, 1896; Martha C, 
Feb. 21, 1899; and Robert L., Oct. 10, 1903. Marion F., the sec- 
ond son of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson, was born Dec. 20, 1883. lie 
married Fern Terry, of Centerville, resides in Hagerstown, and 
they have five children: John N., born July 10, 1903; Lyle, May 
13, 1904; Mary K., April i, 1907; Amy M., Nov. 16, 1908; and Alice 
L., Sept. 28, 1910. 

Frank M. Whitesell, a careful business man and an enterpris- 
ing citizen of Hagerstown, is a native of Wayne county, horn in 
Cambridge City, June 21, 1874, son of Samuel C. and Flmira J. 
(Strickler) Whitesell, born in Wayne count)', the father near the 
Ohio State line and the mother near Hagerstown. The elder 
Whitesell was a school teacher in early life, but later became an 
attorney-at-law, studying in the office of Judge Henry C. Fox. He 
practiced his profession at Centerville until the county seat was re- 
moved to Richmond and then went to Cambridge City, where he 
remained in the practice until 1886. He then removed to Rich- 
mond, where he continued to practice law until his death, Aug. 10, 
1909, and his widow resides with her son, Frank M. Frank M. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 689 

Whitesell is the youngest of their three children, the others being- 
Olive M., who became the wife of J. C. White, of Indianapolis, 
and is deceased; and Charles E., who died in infancy. Frank M. 
Whilesell's education was obtained at the schools of Cambridge 
City and Richmond, and he began his independent career as a 
clerk in the establishment of Deitz & Company at Richmond, with 
whom he remained until the death of Mr. Deitz, having charge of 
the store in 1896. lie then engaged in the newspaper business in 
Richmond, publishing the "Morning Independent," with his father, 
as a partner, two years. Later, he sold the establishment to the 
"Telegram," and, the two papers being consolidated, was em- 
ployed with the new company one year, lie then was connected 
with the "Item," as local editor, until 1900, when he removed to 
Hagerstown and engaged in farming, lie followed this occupa- 
tion until 1909. when he sold his farm and engaged in the drug 
anil general merchandise business, carrying a full line of drugs, 
paints, wall paper, jewelry, etc., also being the local agent of the 
Adams Express Company. His success has been achieved through 
his unaided efforts; his thrift and economy acquiring for him a 
competence, and his future prospects are bright. llis political 
faith is with the Republican party, but his life has been too busy 
to aspire to any public office. On June 4, 1903, he was married to 
Miss Leota Geisler. daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Slifer) 
Geisler, of Hagerstown. The father was a cooper during all of 
his active career and is living retired in Hagerstown. lie and his 
wife became the parents of two children — Mrs. Whitesell and a 
son, Leonard, who was killed while in discharge of his duty as 
marshal of Hagerstown. Mr. Whitesell is a Past Master in" the 
Masonic lodge at Hagerstown and is also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Red Men. 

William Wedekind, for many years a prosperous blacksmith 
at Hagerstown, is a native of Wayne county, having first beheld the 
light of day at Hagerstown, Jan. 6, r866, a son of Theodore and 
Celia (Jennings) Wedekind, the former born in Hamburg, Germany, 
in 1N24, and the latter at Cynthiana, \\y., of English parentage. 
Theodore Wedekind, a wagon-maker by occupation during all of 
his days, migrated to America, when fourteen years old, and after 
a short time in New York City went to Philadelphia. From that 
place he went to Seven Mile, Ohio, and from there removed to 
Hagerstown, where he was engaged in the wagon-making business 
until his death, which occurred in iqoi. He was an expert in 
the manufacture of wagons and buggies and built and occupied 
several shops and buildings in Hagerstown. The marital union of 
him and his worthy wife was blessed by the birth of live children: 
Adolph is a fur buyer and resides in Hagerstown; Lucy is de- 
ceased; Charles is a wood-worker and blacksmith and resides in 
Hagerstown; William is the next in order of birth; and Frank 
is deceased. William Wedekind enjoyed the educational advan- 
tages afforded by the public schools of Hagerstown. lie learned, 
the blacksmith trade, which occupation he has since continued to 



6yo MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

follow, with the exception of a short time which he spent at rail- 
road work. He worked at New Lisbon two seasons and at Dub- 
lin one season, and the remainder of. the lime he has applied him- 
self to his trade at 1 lagerstown, being conceded to be one of the 
best workmen in his line in the State of Indiana. He is the proud 
possessor of a gold medal which was awarded him at the Chicago 
World's Fair, in 1893, on horse shoes and horse-shoeing tools, all 
of which were made by hand and with no mechanical appliances. 
Mr. Wedekind erected the shop which he occupies, in the fall of 
1893, and owns a one-third interest in the undivided estate of his 
father, consisting of city property, etc. In his political affiliations 
Mr. Wedekind is a loyal adherent of the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party, though he reserves the privilege of acting independ- 
ently when the better interests of the community seem to warrant 
it. He is broad-minded and liberal in all of his views and enjoys 
the unqualified esteem of his fellow citizens. He is married to 
Miss Mary Luella Pipher, a daughter of Peter and Martha Ellen 
(Hayes) Pipher, the former born in Hagerstown, Dec. 26, 1841, 
and the latter in Jefferson township, Feb. 10, 1847. Peter Pipher, 
a farmer by occupation a number of years and later engaged in 
the restaurant business in Hagerstown, is living practically retired 
in that village. His beloved wife passed away June 23, 1905. Six 
children were born to Mr. Pipher and wife: Charles, born Dec. 
9, 1864, is engaged in the horse business at Winchester, Tnd. ; Mrs. 
Wedekind is the second in order of birth; William is a barber and 
resides in Indianapolis ; Florence L. is a barber and resides in 
Hagerstown; Minnie is the wife of John A. Bunnell, a farmer, of 
Jefferson township; and Luther C. resides with his father. Mr. 
Wedekind's World's Fair horse-shoe display is preserved in a 
handsome plate-glass case, in quartered oak frame, eleven feet long 
by seven feet wide, with an enlargement of his own splendidly de- 
veloped physique displayed in the center. 

John A. Locke, living virtually retired in the village of Hagers- 
town, where he devotes a portion of his time to the undertaking 
business, was many years prominently identified with the agri- 
cultural industry in Wayne county. He is a native son of this 
county, born in the township of Perry, July 10, 1849, a son OI 
John A. and Charity (P>rooks) Locke, the former born in Perry 
township and the latter in North Carolina. John A. Locke, Sr., 
acquired his educational training in the schools of Perry township 
and in early life followed teaming, from Economy to Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He became a land-owner in his native township and later 
moved into Dalton township, where he was a thrifty and success- 
ful follower of agricultural pursuits continuously until compelled 
by failing health to retire, when he removed to Jefferson town- 
ship and resided with a son the remainder of his days. Tie was 
elected justice of the peace in Dalton township, a fitting recogni- 
tion of his capability and honesty. He was also an extensive stock 
raiser. His was a long and honorable career, in which no man 
can point to a dishonorable act, and this gave him the profound 
respect of those in whose midst he lived and labored; and' in all 



ItlOGK Al'll K" \I. <Y;l 

of his endeavors he displayed the very highest qualities of ability, 
energy and devotion to duty, which made his example a source of 
inspiration to others, and the record of which is a precious heritage 
to the dear ones he left behind, lie lived a devoted, consecrated, 
Christian life, serving his chosen church, that of the United Breth- 
ren faith, as a loyal member and as an exhorter. lie was loved 
as a neighbor and friend, and was extremely useful as a citizen 
and tender and affectionate as a husband and father. He was 
hospitable to an extreme degree and thoroughly enjoyed the com- 
panionship of friends. The true, Christian gentleman that he was, 
he was ever considerate of the feelings and opinions of others and 
possessed a beautiful Christian spirit, which caused him to be as 
fair to those who differed from him as with those whose views 
were strictly in accord with his own, though he refused to com- 
promise with that which he believed to be wrong". The happy 
union of John A. Locke, Si"., and wife was blessed by the birth 
of seven children, of whom the immediate subject of this sketch 
is fifth in point of age, the others being: Cecilia, deceased; Jesse 
W., living retired; William I\L, who resides in Hagerstown ; Mary 
Ann, the wife of John II. Thornburgh. a farmer of Dalton town- 
ship; Orlando B., a farmer who resides in Dalton township; and 
Charity Emma, deceased. The immediate, subject of this review 
received a common school education in Perry and Dalton townships 
and continued to work on his father's farm until he had passed 
his eighteenth birthday. He then rented land several years and 
then purchased a farm in Dalton township, where a number of 
years he successfully and profitably followed agricultural pursuits 
and came to be recognized as one of the progressive and scientific 
farmers of the count}-. About 1898 he turned the management of 
this farm over to his son and removed to Hagerstown, where he 
engaged as a horse dealer and also in the undertaking business. 
He conducted a general breeding barn, dealing in light and heavy 
horses on commission, and continued this business until about 
1909. He still owns 121 acres of land, the greater part of which is 
in Dalton township, and he built the commodious residence where 
he resides, in Hagerstown. He devotes his time to the undertak- 
ing business, but is otherwise retired. In his political affiliations 
he is a staunch supporter of the cause and principles of Repub- 
licanism, though he reserves the privilege of acting independently 
when the welfare of the community seems to warrant it. In his 
religious faith he gives allegiance to the United Brethren church, 
in which he renders effective service in behalf of the higher things 
in life, lie has newer aspired to a public career, preferring to de- 
vote his time and attention to his private business affairs. On 
Jan. 20, 1870, he was united in holy matrimony to Miss Martha E. 
Thornburgh, born in Jefferson township, May 15. 1851, daughter 
of John II. and Harriet (Parsons) Thornburgh. Of this union were 
bom two children: Emma V., born March 22. 1871, died March 
3, 1908; ami Edgar R., born June 3, 1873, resides on the old home- 
stead in Dalton township, married Dora Burroughs, a native of' 
Randolph count)-, and they have two children — Chester and Edith 



692 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

M. John II. Thornburgh, father of Mrs. Locke, was born in Jef- 
ferson township, Sept. 15, 1824. He followed farming in early life, 
but later became a United Brethren minister. lie served as a 
member of the State legislature, and also as justice of the peace 
in Jefferson township a number of years. He died Aug. 27, 1887, 
and his widow resides in Hagerstown. They were the parents of 
seven children: William is a horseman and resides at Mnncie; 
Nelson B. is a farmer and resides in Jefferson township; Mrs. Locke 
is the next in order of birth; Alice C. resides in Hagerstown; Har- 
riet became the wife of I). P. Weaver, of Hagerstown, and is de- 
ceased; May became the wife of Monroe Sherry, of Jackson town- 
ship, and is deceased; and Noble A. was on the police force in 
Muncie twenty years, but now is a carpenter ami resides in Muncie. 
Edwin Seymour Fleming, deceased, for several years a promi- 
nent citizen of Hagerstown, was born at Bainbridge, Ross county, 
Ohio, Feb. 9, 1845, a son OI ^li a "d Sarah (Thompson) Fleming, 
the former born in Pennsylvania and the latter in Ross county, 
Ohio. The father was a Methodist minister more than fifty years 
and died at the age of seventy-live, lie removed from Pennsylva- 
nia to Ross count)', Ohio, in early life, and resided there until 1800, 
when he went to Pes Moines, Iowa, and later to Council Bluffs, 
where he died in August, [897. He was three times married, the 
first two wives dying in Council Bluffs and the third is living in Ne- 
braska. His first wife, mother of Ewin S., died in i860. Edwin S. 
Fleming acquired his elementary educational training at Des 
Moines, Iowa, and at the age of sixteen years was apprenticed to a 
saddler, with whom he remained two years, lie then ran away and 
enlisted as a private in Company F of the Forty-seventh Iowa in- 
fantry for service in the Civil war. lie served about eighteen 
months and was then discharged because of illness. After recover- 
ing his health he engaged in the insurance business, traveling all 
over the West, and then engaged in the mining business in George- 
town, Colo. Later he removed to Chicago, where he was employed 
by the Cooper & Boyle Publishing Company about twenty years, 
and then came to Hagerstown to assist his wife in the management 
of her business affairs, and continued to reside there the remain- 
der of his career. He passed to his reward Jan. 16, 191 1, in his 
sixty-sixth year, leaving his bereaved wife and a wide circle of in- 
timate friends and associates to mourn his death. His life was 
marked by signal integrity and usefulness and he was ever held in 
high repute in the various communities in which he resided. He 
was a liberal, public-spirited citizen, and in politics was an ardent 
advocate of the Republican party, lie was prominent in Masonic 
circles, being a member of Hagerstown Lodge No. 49. On Aug. 7, 
1802, Edwin S. Fleming was united in marriage to Mrs. Clara 
(Newcomb) Jlindman, a daughter of Matthew and Susanna 
(French) Newcomb, natives of Montgomery county, Ohio, the 
father bom Dec. 11, 1818, and the mother July 7, 1821;. The father 
was reared and educated in his native county and in March, 185 1, 
came to Wayne count)-, locating on a farm in Jefferson township, 
three miles north of Haeerstown. lie resided there until 1886, 



BIOGRAPHIC AL 693 

when he rented the farm and removed to Hagerstown, where he re- 
sided during the remainder of his life, passing away in April, 1891, 
and his widow died March 11, 1895, on the fiftieth anniversary of 
her marriage. Five children were born to the union of Mr. New- 
comb and wife, and Mrs. Edwin S. Fleming is the eldest, the oth- 
ers being: Franklin, who died in September, 1866; one who died in 
infancy; Sarah, the wife of Edgar Eleiner, a druggist of Bloom- 
field, End., and a child that died in infancy. Mrs. Fleming was first 
married Jan. 27, 1873, to William llindman, a native of Miami 
count)-, Ohio, who became a merchant at Green's Fork. Later he 
engaged in fanning for a time and then became a traveling sales- 
man. Of that union were two children: Matthew X., who was 
killed on the raiboad'in 1894, and Daisy, who died in 1880. Mrs. 
Fleming owns 160 acres of land of her father's estate and also the 
old homestead in Hagerstown, where she expects t" reside the resi- 
due of her life. She is a member of the Eastern Star ami is promi- 
nnt in social affairs. 

Michael Conniff, a popular and highly esteemed retired citi- 
zen of Hagerstown, is another of Ireland's native sons who has at- 
tained tu success and prosperity in America, lie first beheld the 
light of da)' in County Clare, Ireland, Nov. 3, 1847, a son (,1 ~ Owen 
and Elizabeth U allahan) Conniff, natives of the Little Green Isle. 
Owen Conniff, born in Count)' Roscommon, was reared and edu- 
cated in his native land and followed school teaching until 1850, 
when he migrated to America, locating in Cincinnati, where for a 
time he was employed on public works. In [852 his family followed 
him to America, landing at New ( h'leans and thence joining the fa- 
ther at Cincinnati. The)- resided there about eighteen months and 
then came to Wayne county. On Oct. 18, 1852, they located in 
Hagerstown, where the father secured employment on the Pan- 
handle railroad, engaged in construction work, and continued with 
the Pennsylvania company a number of years. Later, he had 
charge of the commissar)' department of the Big Four Railroad 
Company and still later served in the same capacity for the Yan- 
dalia company, continuing at railroad work as commissary clerk 
until he retired from active labor. For forty-six consecutive years 
he continued to reside in Hagerstown, enjoying the respect and high 
regard of the entire community, and here, on Oct. 11, 1898, he re- 
ceived his summons to eternal rest, llis beloved wife, the mother 
of Michael, passed away July 25, 1894, and the community joined 
her bereaved husband and children in mourning her death. Light 
children, two of whom survive, were born to this worthy couple: 
Patrick was a farmer and died in Missouri in 1895; the second 
child died in infancy, in Ireland; James was a restaurant man in 
Indianapolis and died in December, 1887; Michael is the next in 
order of birth,; Alary is the wife of Henry Kunkle, of [ndianapolis; 
Elizabeth died in March, 1875; and Susan and I'ridgel were twins, 
both deceased. The subject of this review passed the clays of his 
boyhood and youth in I Iagerstown, meanwhile availing himself 
of the educational advantages afforded by the schools of that 
village. Subsecpient to the passing of his school days, Mr. 



(nj4 MEMOIRS OV WAYNE COUNTY 

Conniff continued to make his home with parents until the summer 
of 1863, when he enlisted as a private in Company B of the Fifth 
Indiana cavalry, under Capt. William Lindsay, for service in the 
Civil war. lie was mustered into the service Aug. 9, 1863, and 
joined the regiment at Nicholsville, Ivy. It started on Aug. 18 for 
Fast Tennessee and reached Knoxville, Sept. 1, being the first regi- 
ment of Union troops to enter that city. Jt was in an expedition 
across the Smoky Mountains and on its return moved to Green- 
ville. It was then in an expedition to Bristol, being engaged in 
heavy skirmishing and the battle near ZollicolYer. Jt was also in 
an engagement near Blountsville and captured a number of pris- 
oners. While marching toward Loudon and Bull's Lap the regi- 
ment met 3,000 of the enemy near Henderson's Mill and engaged 
in a fierce fight, holding the enemy in check in frequent hand-to- 
hand combats, and when nearly surrounded cut its way through 
the lines and rejoined its brigade. Later, near Rheatowu, it came 
upon the enemy's rear and engaged him again. It was in a second 
engagement near Blountsville and was on outpost duty at Jones- 
horo until Nov. 6, when it moved to Cheek's Cross-Roads, thence 
to Tazewell, and later to Maynardville. it was in a heavy skirmish 
with a division of cavalry and in heavy fighting at Walker's Ford. 
It marched to lllain's Cross-roads and Lean's Station, where an- 
other fierce battle was fought, the regiment retreating toward Rut- 
ledge and going into camp at Llain's Cross-roads. On Dec. 23 it 
moved to Mossy Creek and remained there until Jan. 1.4, 18(14, be- 
ing constantly engaged in fighting. It participated in the battle of 
Dandridge and made a charge on foot three-quarters of a mile in 
advance of the main line of battle, driving the enemy before it. On 
the retreat it reached Knoxville, Jan. 19, 1864, and there the horses 
of the regiment were turned over to the Fourteenth Illinois cavalry. 
The regiment made a scout on foot to Pigeon Creek, then moved to 
Cumberland Gap and thence to Mt. Sterling, where it was remount- 
ed. On May 1 it started to Tunnel Hill, Ga., and with Stoneman's 
command participated in the Atlanta campaign, being engaged in 
all the cavalry operations from Dalton to Decatur. Marching in 
a raid towards' Macon in July, it took part in attack upon the enemy 
and drove him two miles. Near llillsboro it participated in an en- 
gagement with a body of Wheeler's cavalry and was left on the 
field to hold the enemy in check until the main body was entirely 
out of danger. Then the regiment was surrendered by General 
Stoneman againt Colonel Butler's earnest protest. This occurred 
on July 31, and Mr. Conniff was taken as a prisoner to Anderson- 
ville, where he was confined two months, and was then taken to a 
prison at Florence, S. C, where he remained until he was paroled 
in the latter part of the following December. He was mustered out 
June i6, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. Mr. Conniff then returned to 
this county and during the succeeding two years worked as an 
ordinary farm hand throughout the summer months. In 1868 he 
rented a farm and continued to follow agricultural pursuits a num- 
ber of years. During Cleveland's first administration he served as 
postmaster at Hagerstown and after retiring from that position en- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 695 

gaged in the draying business a number of years. For the last sev- 
eral years he has lived retired in Hagerstown. In his business af- 
fairs Mr. Conniff has always been keen, sagacious, and active, and 
nis kindly, courteous demeanor has won him hosts of friends in 
every walk of life, He is recognized throughout his community 
as one of the trustworthy, substantial men of the county. Though 
lie never aspired to a public career, as before stated he served four 
years as postmaster, and was for some time the incumbent of the 
office of member of the village council of Hagerstown, the duties 
of which positions lie discharged in a manner entirely satisfactory 
to all concerned. Fraternally lie is a member of the Masonic order 
and of the independent Order of Odd Fellows, in the local organiza- 
tions of which he has passed through the chairs. Ilis wife is a mem- 
ber of the Rebekahs and of the Eastern Star. On Feb. 23, 1868, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Conniff to Miss Lucinda -Crull, 
born in Henry county, Indiana, Feb. 22. 1852, daughter of William 
and Louisa (Pressel) Crull, natives respectively of Montgomery 
county, Ohio, and Henry county, Indiana. The father was born 
June 21, [831, and the mother on April 29, 1834. The father came 
to Indiana when two years old with his parents, who settled in Jef- 
ferson township, this county, and he resided there until 1874, wlien 
he disposed of his holdings and removed to Jefferson county, Kan- 
sas, where his wife passed to the life eternal, Feb. 19, 1S96. Mr. 
Crull continued to reside in Kansas until in January, iqit, when he 
went to Mound City, Mo., where he resides with a daughter. He 
and his wife became the parents of four children: Mrs. Conniff is 
the eldest; Elizabeth became the wife of William Nininger, a mer- 
chant of Kansas City, Mo., and died in March, 1888; Nancy died in 
1862, at the age of four years ; and Elsie is the wife of Robert Smith, 
a retired merchant of Mound City, Mo. The happy marital union 
of Mr. Conniff and wife was blessed by the birth of four children: 
Clara, born Aug. 27, 1872, died at the age of eleven years; Nora, 
born July 24, 1875, is the wife of John Sells, of Hagerstown. and 
they have two children — Leona, born July 16, 1896, and Jesse, born 
Sept. 23, 1903; Jennie, born July 31, 1878, died Sept. 6, 1879; and 
Eddie, born Sept. 6, 1881, died Feb. 14, 1885. Mr. Conniff is a Dem- 
ocrat in politics. 

Benjamin F. Parsons, Jr., a popular meat dealer of Hagerstown, 
this county, is one of Wayne's native sons, born in the viljage of 
Hagerstown, Feb. 20, 1884, a son of George W. and Priscilla (Ma- 
thews) Parsons, the former a native of Jefferson township and the 
latter of Cincinnati, Ohio. George W. Parsons, born on what is 
now the "Reynolds Farm," in Jefferson township, in September, 
1843, was reared on that homestead, one of five children, all de- 
ceased, except R. F. Parsons, Sr., of Richmond, and Martha, wife 
of D. A. Rudy, of Indianapolis. His educational advantages were 
those of the district schools, and he left school to enlist as a pri- 
vate in Company I of the Fifty-seventh Indiana infantry for service 
in the Civil war, later being promoted to orderly sergeant, first 
lieutenant, and captain of his company. This regiment was re- 
cruited in the Fifth and Eleventh Congressional districts and was 



6o6 MEMOIRS OK WAYNE COUNTY 

organized at Richmond, in November, 1861. It was mustered in 
Nov. 18, and left the State Dec. 23, reporting to General Knell at 
Louisville, where it was assigned to the Sixth division, Army of the 
Ohio, and ordered to' Bardstown, Ivy. It moved to Lebanon, and 
on Feb. 12, 1862, to Munfordville, and thence to Nashville, It 
started for Pittsburg Landing March 21, and was actively engaged 
at Shiloh. It participated in the siege of Corinth and moved from 
thence to Northern Alabama, where it remained until July, when 
it was ordered to Tennessee, It was on duty near Tullahoma and 
McMinnville until September and then took an active part in the 
campaign against Bragg in Kentucky, being in the battle of Perry- 
ville. it was at Nashville during most of December, guarding for- 
age trams and engaged in frequent skirmishes. At the battle of 
Stone's River it was attached to the left wmg of the army and dis- 
tinguished 11 self by its gallantly in resisting the fierce attacks made 
upon the lines at that point. It was in camp near Murfreesboro 
during the winter and spring of 1803, took part in Reynolds' "eleven 
days' scout" in April, and participated in the campaign against 
Tullahoma, It was in camp near iVlham until Aug. [6, when it 
joined 111 the campaign toward Chattanooga ami operated on the 
north Mde of the Tennessee, opposite that city, its brigade taking 
possession of Chattanooga on its evacuation after the battle of 
Chickamauga. Colonel Lennard was assigned as provost-marshal 
ami the regiment was placed on duty as provost guard. It was in 
the battle of Missionary Ridge and was then assigned to the Second 
division (Sheridan's), Fourth corps, which formed a part of the 
column sent to the relief of ljurnside at Knoxville. Air. Parsons 
re-enlisted with the regiment, Jan. 1. 1864, and was furloughed home 
in March- With his regiment he rejoined the Fourth corps, May 5, 
and took part in the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Rocky 
Pace Ridge, Resaca, Adairsville. Allatoona, New Hope Church, ami 
in the heavy skirmishes about Kenesaw Mountain. In the assault 
of June 27 the regiment formed the skirmish line in front of the 
assaulting column of the Fourth corps and was on the skirmish line 
at Peachtree Creek, where, after a desperate resistance, a portion of 
the regiment was captured by the Confederates. Captain Parsons 
was, imfortunatly, one of the number, and the next three months 
he experienced the horrors of Andcrsonville prison, lie was re- 
leased at the end of that time and, resuming his command, was with 
Thomas' army which resisted the enemy's invasion of Tennessee, 
lie was engaged at Franklin and was in the battle of Nashville, 
after which the regiment moved to llunlsville. Ala., in pursuit of 
llood, remaining there until spring. It moved into Tennessee in 
April, 1805, proceeding from Bull's Gap to Nashville, in July was 
transferred to Texas, being stationed at Port Lavaca, and was 
mustered out Dec. 14, 1865. Captain Parsons came home via In- 
dianapolis and engaged with his father in the buying and selling 
of horses, taking them overland to the Chicago market, lie was 
married in 1866 and then engaged in the grocers business, but later 
entered the meal business and continued in that line of industry 
until he retired, in 1908, and he died at llagerstown in August, £910. 



BIOGRAPHICAL (>97 

He served eight years as assessor of Jefferson township. The fam- 
ily has a history of Andersonville Prison which Captain Parsons 
wrote, relating his experience as a prisoner in that place. To him 
ami his good wife were horn eleven children: Fannie is deceased; 
Amos \Y. is a mechanic and resides in llagerstown; Emma J. is 
deceased; Sherman is deceased; Harrison C. is engaged in the res- 
taurant business at Cambridge City; Charles is deceased; Gertrnde 
is the wife of George Ueeson, of Jefferson township; Edna is de- 
ceased; Benjamin F., Jr., is the next in order of birth; George W., 
Jr., resides in Hagerstown, and Mar)- is deceased. Benjamin F. 
Parsons, Jr., acquired his educational training at the schools of 
Jefferson township and at the age of fourteen years began to re- 
ceive wages in his father's employ, remaining with his father until 
the retirement of the latter, in 1908. lie then worked for his father's 
.successor in the business until the spring of L909, when lie went to 
New Castle and engaged independently in the meat business, lie 
remained at that place until the latter part of September, 1909, and 
then removed his fixtures, etc., to llagerstown, where he has since 
continued in the wholesale ami retail meat business, operating the 
old plant formerly owned by his father, lie carries a complete line 
of meats and enjoys an extensive and lucrative patronage, supply- 
ing main of the homes in that vicinity with that important neces- 
sity of life. Air. Parsons is one of the enterprising and loyal citizens 
of his native county and is held in high regard in the community. 
Politically he is a stanch supporter of the Republican party. On 
Aug. 4, 1906, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Hazel Clapper, 
born near Mooreland, in Henry county, Jan. 20, 1887, a daughter of 
Jacob and Laura (Taylor) Clapper, natives of Henry count)-. To 
.Mr. and Mrs. Parsons was born a son, Roy )., July 17, 1011. Jacob 
Clapper, a farmer by occupation, and his beloved wife have always 
resided in Henry county, where he has operated a farm during his 
entire career, with the exception of a period which he devoted to 
bookkeeping for his father and father-in-law, who were engaged 
in the pork-packing industry in New Castle. Four children were 
born to Mr. Clapper and wife: Walter is a farmer and resides in 
Dallon township, Wayne count)-; Cordon resides in llagerstown; 
Mrs. Parsons is the next in order of birth; and Mildred resides at 
the parental home. Mr. and Mrs. Parsons are members of the 
Friends 1 church at Franklin, in Daltpn township. 

Walter M. Harris, a prominent and influential farmer of Web- 
ster township, is one of Wayne's native sons who has attained to 
pronounced success and prestige in the agricultural industry. He 
was born in Clay township, April 24, 1873, a son of Daniel W. 
Harris (see sketch). The son acquired his elemental")- educational 
training at Sugar Grove school in his native township and remained 
upon the parental farmstead until the age of twenty-three years, iit 
1896, when he removed to Webster township, renting a farm of 
160 acres owned by his father, where he resided until ioi_>, when 
he purchased a farm of eighty acres in Green township, known as 
the "Aimer Claussen farm." 1 11 politics lie is a loyal advocate of 
Republicanism, and though a loyal and public spirited citizen has 



698 MEMOIRS OF WAYXH COUNTY 

never fostered any aspirations for a public career, preferring to 
devote his entire time and attention to his industrial and business 
affairs. On Oct. 14, 1896, Mr. Harris was happily united in mar- 
riage to Miss Nora King, born in Center township, 1877, a daughter 
of Joseph L. and Ollie L. (Stevens) King, natives of Wayne county. 
The father has always followed agricultural pursuits and he and 
his wife reside on the farm where Airs. Harris was born. They are 
the parents of three children: Lizzie is the wife of Joseph II. 
Thompson, a farmer of Webster township; Mary is the wife of 
William T. Barton, a horse dealer of Centerville; and Mrs. Harris 
is the youngest. Five children have been born to the subject of this 
review and wife: Genevieve, born June 14, 1897, died Aug. 2, 1909; 
Violet, born Sept. 12, 1899; Olive, born Dec. 11, 1901 ; Francis, born 
March 22, 1004; and Joseph Daniel, born May 2, 1905. 

Hamilton Williams, deceased, for years one of the substantial 
citizens of Webster township, was born in Boston township, this 
count)-, Dec. 27, i860, lie was a son of John T. and I.ucinda 
(Grimes) Williams, the former born near Baltimore, Md., and the 
latter in Boston township, Wayne county. The father came to 
Indiana when a young man and settled in Boston township, where 
he married and became a land-owner, and he and his wife resided 
there until about 1901, when they removed to the city of Richmond 
and have since lived retired. They became the parents of six chil- 
dren : Howard is a farmer and resides in Boston township; Hamil- 
ton was the second in order of birth ; Laura is the widow of John 
Moore and resides in Carroll county; Charles is a farmer and re- 
sides in Boston township; Emma is the wife of Francis E. McMinn, 
of Centerville; and Anna is the wife of Sleighton Kline, a farmer 
of Logansport. Hamilton Williams received his educational train- 
ing at the Bunker Hill school, south of Richmond. He resided at 
home until about twenty-five years old and then rented a farm in 
Boston township, upon which tract he resided one year. Then, 
after living with his parents a year, he purchased the farm where 
his widow resides. This farm he purchased of his father, the tract 
consisting of 118 acres, but he subsequently added to it and at the 
time i)i his death owned 200 acres in Webster township, to the oper- 
ation of which he devoted his entire time and attention. Tn his 
political views Mr. Williams was a stanch Democrat. He was twice 
married. His first wife was Ollie Krauskoff, of Boston township. 
One child, Roy, was born of this union, and he married Portia Craig, 
of Green township, and resides in Webster township, where he is 
engaged in fanning. The wife and mother passed away about one 
year after her marriage, and on Sept. 30, 1804, Mr. Williams was 
married to Miss Mattie Manifold, born near Hagerstown, in Jeffer- 
son township, Jan. 20, t868. Of this second union were born six 
children: Frank, July 28, 1895; Lessie, Oct. 28, 1S96; Lucile, Aug. 
5, 1800; Mabel, Nov. 10, 1901 ; Ethel, Aug. 22, 1903; and Helen, 
March 4, 1907. Mr. Williams' death occurred March 25, 1909, and 
the widow resides at the homestead. Mrs. Williams is the daughter 
of Joseph and Caroline (Allen) Manifold, born in Jefferson .town- 
ship, this county. The father was born Aug. 15, 1827, and died June 



BIOGRAPHICAL 699 

9, 1910, the mother passing away about 1871. The father became 
a land-owner in Jefferson township and followed farming there 
until the later years of his life, when he lived among his children, 
of whom there were four born to him and his devoted wife: Thomas 
is deceased; Ida is the wife of William Hoover, a farmer of Tipton, 
hid.,; Mrs. Williams is the next in order of birth; and Polly is the 
wife of William O. Cleveland, a farmer of Jefferson township. 

Luther Z. King, who maintains his home in his native town- 
ship of Webster, engaged in general farming and the breeding of 
Short-Horn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, is a representative of 
one of the prominent and highly honored pioneer families of this 
section of the State, with whose annals the name has been identified 
nearly eighty-five years. Mr. King was born on the farm where he 
resides, in Webster township, .April 25, 1872, a son of William and 
Jemima (Jackson) King (see sketch of Thomas L. King). Luther 
'/.. King passed his boyhood and youth on the homestead farm in 
Webster township, earl)- beginning to assist in its work, and at- 
tended school at Olive Hill and also district schools in Webster 
township. He has continuous!)' made his home in his native county. 
His mother died when he was eighteen years old and, as he was one 
of three heirs to the homestead, he has continued to reside there per- 
manently, operating the farm of 160 acres in a general way and also 
devoting considerable attention to the raising of line stock. He en- 
joys the respect of the community which has ever represented his 
home and is a citizen of prominence and influence. He is a Repub- 
lican in principle but independent in politics, is a valued member 
of lloosier Lodge, No. 23, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at 
Centerville, and is a member of the Christian church. On June 3, 
1896, Mr. King was married to Miss Grace Silver, daughter of 
Horatio and Sarah (Griffith) Silver. Mrs. King was born in Preble 
count\ r , Ohio, Oct. 11, 1873. Mr. and Mrs. King have one child, 
Horatio W., born March 7, 1897. Mrs. King's father resides at her 
home, the mother being deceased. 

William Albert King, living partially retired in the township 
of Webster, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer fam- 
ilies o\ Wayne county and is a native of Webster township, lie is 
well known in Wayne county and his circle of friends is circum- 
scribed only by that of his acquaintance. Mr. King was born on 
the farm where he resides, March 19, 1853, a son of William and 
Jemima (Jackson) King (see sketch of Thomas L. King). William 
A. King secured his educational discipline at the Olive Hill school 
and in the schools of Webster township and resided at home until 
thirty-two years old. He then moved to a farm which he had pur- 
chased, about one mile north of his present location, the tract con- 
sisting of 106 acres of land. Pie resided there about four years and 
then sold that farm and moved to one near Centerville, where his 
brother, Thomas L., resides. He operated this place one year and 
then purchased the old King homestead, the same upon which he- 
resides, and this has been his home continuously since Feb. 2.J, 1890. 
In this farm there are no acres of land. Here he lives in an attrac- 
tive residence, surrounded by "troops of friends," tried and true. 



70O MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

From the time of attaining his legal majority Mr. King has heen 
aligned as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the 
Republican party, but has never sougth or held public office, lie is 
a member of the Christian church. In 1884 he was married to I len- 
rietla Hawkins, horn in Randolph count)', 1ml., Aug. 20, 1851, 
daughter of William and Agatha (Teagle) Hawkins, the former 
born in South Carolina, Jan. 11, 1809, and the latter near Staunton, 
\'a., Feb. 15, 1810. The father came to Richmond when about 
twenty years old and lived with an uncle near that city, engaging in 
driving stock lo Cincinnati, Ohio, lie was married in 1832 and 
later went to Randolph county, where he became an extensive land- 
owner. He also engaged in the milling business and continued to 
reside in Randolph county from about 1842 until his death, in May, 
1880, his widow surviving until Oct. 15, 1897. lie became the 
owner of about 700 acres of land and held various local offices, tie 
and his wife were the parents of nine children: Elizabeth is the wife 
of James Alshire, a farmer residing near Winchester; Mary Ann 
is deceased; Rachel is the widow of Joseph" Maggard and resides 
at Aberdeen, Wash.; Martha died at Independence. Mo., in Decem- 
ber, 1910, at the age of seventy years; James is deceased; Columbus 
is in the real-estate business m Indianapolis; Mrs. King is the next 
in order of birth; Matilda is the wife of K. L. Mull, a shoe dealer 
in Albany, Ind.; and William L. is engaged in the real-estate and 
loan business in Winchester. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. King 
were burn two children: Everett lb, born Oct. 10, [886, died Dec. 
o, [890.; and William Feme, born Nov. 28, 1888, is a student in 
Earlham College. 

William B. Flatley, one of the representative farmers of Wayne 
county, residing in the township of Webster, is a scion of a sterling 
family which came from Ireland to America about fifty years ago, 
and its record is one in which he may justly take pride and satis- 
faction. The Little Green Isle figures as his place of nativity, since 
he was born in County Mayo, Ireland, Jan. 6, 1861. He is a son 
of Thomas and Margaret (Tiamon) Flatley, born in Count)- Mayo, 
Ireland. Thomas Flatley came to America in [865 and was first 
employed by William King, in Webster township, this count). 
Later he worked for others, among whom were George Davis, Miles 
Hunt, and Presslev King, and in 1870 purchased the farm where 
his son, William lb, resides, and there spent the residue of his life. 
He was also employed at Camden, Ohio, one winter, engaged in 
the work of making a mill race, lie became one of the prominent 
and influential citizens of Webster township and ever commanded 
uniform confidence and esteem. His death occurred in February, 
1897, and his wife passed away in 1885, secure in the affectionate 
regard of all who knew her. She came to America with the chil- 
dren in [868 and joined her husband in Webster township. Thomas 
Flatley and wife were the parents of seven children: Mary is the 
wife of Thomas Mungavin, of New Paris, Ohio, and they have six 
children — Mary, John, Thomas, James, Celia and William; Bridget 
is the wife of Patrick Harrigan, a farmer in Preble county, Ohio 
and they have seven children — Catherine, Mary, Frank, Maggie, 



BIOGRAPHICAL JO\ 

Alice, Leo, and Anna; Patrick is night watchman at St. Vincent's 
Institute at St. Louis; Ann is the wife of Patrick Quigley, a farmer 
in Green township, and they have seven children — Edward, Mary, 
Frank, William, James, Joseph, Margueret, and John; William II. 
is the next in order of birth; John died in Ireland at the age of 
three years; and Thomas A. is in the street railway service at St. 
Louis. William B. Flatley secured his early educational discipline 
at a Friends' school in Webster and in the Swamp Valley and Olive 
Hill schools, his entire attendance amounting to about twenty-one 
months. .After leaving school lie worked for others, from the time 
lie was twelve years old, and at the age of about nineteen went to 
Indianapolis and secured employment with a coffin veneering com- 
pany, being thus engaged about four months, lie then accepted a 
position with the Citizens' Railway Company, as driver, in which 
capacity he served about four months and then came home and as- 
sisted his father in building his house. He remained at home until 
the death of his mother and then went to St. Louis, where he se- 
cured employment with the Citizens' Railway Company and re- 
mained so engaged about fifteen years, serving first as driver and 
then successively as conductor, gripman, and motorman. In 1900 
he returned to the old homestead and turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, llis homestead farm, comprising 65.75 acres, is 
among the best in the county, and he is meeting with marked suc- 
cess in conducting the same, as he brings to bear intimate technical 
knowledge, progressive ideas, ami keen business discrimination. 
Air. Flatley takes a lively interest in all that tends to further the best 
interests of the community, is an independent supporter of the 
cause of the Republican part)', and holds membership in the St. 
Mary's Roman Catholic Church at Richmond. On Sept. 17, 1887, 
Mr. Flatley was united in marriage to Miss Alary O'Alalley, born 
in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1863, a daughter of Patrick and Alary 
(.Norton) O'Alalley, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, where they 
lived their entire lives. Mrs. Flatley came to America alone when 
fourteen years old, going to St. Louis, where she worked as a do- 
mestic in the family of Colonel Flad, architect of the Eades Bridge, 
until married. She was one of two children, a brother, Patrick, 
being the janitor at the Marquette Hotel in St. Louis. Airs. Flatley 
died in 1896, having become the mother of five children: Margaret, 
born Feb. 23, 1888, resides at home with her father; Andrew, bom 
Jan. 21, 1890, is a fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad, in the Ham- 
ilton yards; Anna, born June 25, 1892, resides at home; John, born 
in 1894, died in childhood; and Agnes, born March 19, 189b, died 
in infancy. 

William Wilcoxen is a scion of one of the best known and 
most highly honored pioneer families of Wayne, county, which has 
been llis home from birth, and is engaged in farming in Webster 
township, lie has well upheld the prestige of the name which he 
bears and is one of the popular and influential citizens of his native 
county- He was born at what is now Silver Point, in the township 
of Webster, Nov. 2, 187b, and that township has been the scene of 
his endeavors during the greater part of his career, lie is a son of 



JQ2 MKMOlKS 01" WAYNIi COUNTY 

Josiah Thomas and Viola A. (Smith) Wilcoxen, the former born 
north of Richmond, in Wayne township, and the latter near Green's 
Fork. The paternal great-grandfather was Josiah Wilcoxen, who 
came from Maryland to Wayne county, and the maternal great- 
grandfather was Job Smith. The paternal grandparents were John 
and Mary (DeMoss) Wilcoxen, the parents of the latter having also 
come from Maryland. The maternal grandparents were John and 
Martha E. (Murray) Smith, and after the death of the former the 
latter married a Mr. Purvis, who was killed in the Civil war. . The 
father of Martha E. (Murray) Smith was Robert Murray, who 
came to Wayne county from North Carolina with his widowed 
mother, Elizabeth Murray. He married Nancy Ann Nordyke, 
daughter of Isaac Nordyke, who came to Wayne county from New 
Jersey. In early life Josiah T. Wilcoxen, father of William, was 
a farmer and gardener and he spent his last days in a comfortable 
residence in the village of Webster, where his widow resides. About 
one year before his death, March 5, 1905, he was appointed rural 
mail carrier from the Webster postomce. In the Civil war he served 
as a private in Company K of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth 
Indiana infantry. This regiment was organized by the consolida- 
tion of three companies, raised in the Sixth Congressional district 
for the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth regiment, and seven com- 
panies raised in the Fifth Congressional district, rendezvousing at 
Richmond. It was mustered in March 10, 1864, left the State on the 
19th, proceeding to Nashville via Louisville, and was assigned to 
the division commanded by General Hovey. On April 5 it pro- 
ceeded to Athens, Tenn., and with its corps marched toward Red 
Clay, Ga. It was in an engagement at Pmzzard Roost; in frequent 
skirmishes in the vicinity of Resaca and Kingston ; in sharp fighting 
at Lost Mountain, and was actively engaged at Kenesaw Mountain. 
The regiment was in a constant skirmish until Atlanta was reached; 
was in the battle of Atlanta on the 22<1 of July ; took part in the 
siege of Atlanta; fought at Jonesboro, and then remained in camp 
at Decatur until Oct. 4, when it accompanied the column in pursuit 
of Hood; had a sharp skirmish at the Oostanaula river; continued 
the pursuit as far as Gavlesville, Ala.; moved via Cedar Bluffs and 
Dalton to Nashville, where it joined General Thomas' command. 
It next moved for Pulaski, reaching there on the 15th, and pro- 
ceeded thence to Columbia, where it was in a brisk skirmish two 
days. On the march toward Franklin it was in a brisk fight at 
Spring Hill, ft was in the battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, repelling 
every assault; was next engaged in the battle of Nashville, and 
joined in pursuit of Hood as far as Columbia, whence it moved to 
Clifton, embarked for Cincinnati, moved thence to Washington, 
which' was reached on Jan. 30, 1865; then sailed for Morehead City, 
N. O, which was reached Feb. 27. From Newborn it marched 
toward Kinston, being engaged at Wise's Forks, and aided in re- 
pulsing an assault. From Kinston it marched for Goldsboro, where 
a junction was effected with Sherman's army, March 21. It was 
•stationed at Lenoir Institute a short time, moving for Greensboro 
on May 3, thence to Charlotte, where it went into camp, ft re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 703 

turned to Greensboro July 13, remained there until Any. 31, when it 
was mustered out. Mr. Wilcoxen participated in all the service of 
his regiment until stricken with typhoid fever and was then con- 
fined in a hospital a considerable length of time, lfe and his good 
wife became the parents of eight children: Birdie and Sarah E. are 
deceased ; -'William is the next in order of birth; George C. is in the 
grocery business in Richmond; 'Edward J. resides in Webster ; 
Alonzo 11. is a carpenter and resides with his mother; Harry C. 
resides in Richmond; and Charles died in infancy. William Wil- 
coxen is indebted to the public schools at Swamp Valley in Web- 
ster township, a school in Randolph county, the Starr school in 
Wayne township, and the schools of the village of Webster for his 
early educational training, and when about fourteen years old began 
working as a hired hand at general farming and dairying, lie con- 
tinued thus employed until about twenty-one year.- old, when he 
worked in a combined dairy and creamery about ten months, at the 
end of which time he secured a position in a creamer}- at Webster, 
where he was employed about three years. He then took charge 
of a creamery which was located between Williamsburg and Econ- 
omy, serving as a butter-maker there about six months, and then 
returned to the Webster creamery, where he worked until 1905. 
In that year he rented the farm where he resides and which con- 
sists of 100 acres, and has since devoted his attention to farming in 
a general way. He also does some dairying, keeping a number of 
fine Jersey cattle. He is known as an alert and progressive busi- 
ness man and public-spirited citizen, and to him is accorded the 
same high regard which has ever been a popular concomitant of 
the family name. In politics he is found arrayed as a stalwart sup- 
porter of the cause of the Republican party, but has never been 
ambitious for public office. In the time-honored Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows he has served as installing officer of the local organi- 
zation, also having membership in the Rebekahs. On March 4, 
1903, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Wilcoxen to Miss May 
M. Roosa, born in New Garden township, May 8, 1876, a daughter 
of William W. and Amanda E. (Evans) Roosa. The only child of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilcoxen is Mildred Juanita, born June 21, 1906. 
William W. Roosa, father of Mrs. Wilcoxen, was bom near Leb- 
anon, Ohio, son of David and Elizabeth (Wilson) Roosa, who came 
from Ohio to Indiana, and the mother was born cm the farm where 
her daughter, Mrs. Wilcoxen, resides. Her parents were Mark and 
Maria (Carver) Evans. Joseph Evans, grandfather of Mark Evans, 
came to Wayne county in an early day and entered several quarter- 
sections of land in Webster and Clay townships. A part of this 
land has remained in the possession of his descendants to 
the present day. William W. Roosa was a farmer practically 
all of his life and as a young man came to Indiana with his 
parents. He served in the Civil war as a private in Com- 
pany B of the Second Ohio heavy artillery. This regiment 
was organized at Camp Dennison from June to September, 
1863, to serve three years. Company B was first moved to 
Covington Barracks, Ky., thence to Bowling Green; in May, 1864. 



704 MEMOIRS 01- WAYNE COUNTY 

to Charleston, Term. ; in August it was at Cleveland and took part 
in an engagement at that place; in October it moved to Fort San- 
ders and Knoxville; in November moved to open communications 
with the Union forces at Strawberry Plains; returned to Knoxville; 
in December marched to Bean's Station, and again returned to 
Knoxville. moving immediately thereafter to Camp Rothrock and 
Fort livington. It was mustered out of service with the regiment, 
Aug. 23, 1865, in accordance with orders from the War Department. 
After returning home Mr. Roosa rented land a number of years and 
then purchased a small farm in Webster township, where he resided 
about twelve years, lie added to his real-estate holdings until he 
owned at the time of his death IOO acres, besides a residence prop- 
erty in Fountain City, where his widow resides, be having passed 
away Sept. 2, 1906. They became the parents of live children : Sadie 
is deceased ; Mrs. Wilco.xen is the next in order of birth; ami the 
others are Roscoe L„ Murrcl, and Audrey. 

Jesse M. Hutton. — In the passing of Jesse M. Ilutton, on 
March 25, 1886. the city of Richmond and Wayne county lost one 
of its most distinguished and respected citizens, whose kindly deeds 
and many excellent qualities are remembered by those who came 
within the sphere of his extensive acquaintance. Mr. Hutton was 
born at New Market, Frederick county, Maryland, Jan. 30, 1809. 
llis early life was a struggle with poverty and its attending ob- 
stacles, and is thus epitomized from notes written by himself a 
short time before bis death. A poor boy in a slave State, he had 
little opportunity to secure even a common school education, and 
at an early age learned the trade of millwright. Afterward he en- 
gaged in a very moderate way in the manufacture of threshing 
machines. Becoming convinced that the W r est offered superior ad- 
vantages he Started on horseback to cross the mountains, about 
1835, with Ohio as his destination, and for a while remained at 
Mount Vernon, in that State. Failing in health, he returned to 
Maryland and, in 1836, with bis mother, started for Indiana, arriv- 
ing in the then small town of Richmond, where he decided to make 
a permanent location. After working at day wages for a time he, 
with his brother— the late John II. Ilutton— and Isaac F. Jones 
purchased the old Starr Cotton factory and converted it into what 
became extensively known as the Spring Foundry, from which was 
evolved the establishment of Caar, Scott & Company. Being lim- 
ited in capital through the tightness of money, the company — part 
of the time known as J. M. & J. IT. Ilutton — struggled along for 
fourteen years and eventually built up a very successful enter- 
prise. In [868 Mr. Ilutton, in company with George llasecoster, 
Samuel S. Gause, George Schuerman, William P. Ilutton, and 
Matthew IP Dill, organized and incorporated the firm of J. M. 
Hutton & Company, manufacturers of coffins, which was a pros- 
perous enterprise from the start and has been one of the most suc- 
cessful manufacturing plants in the city. Mr. Ilutton was also 
interested in several real estate deals and with bis brother at one 
time owned the site of the present homes of William Dudley 
FoP ind Rudolph G. Leeds, the original building's there having 




^z-^r^- 




UIOGK Al'IlH'Al. 705 

been erected by them. Always actively interested in the public 
welfare, at the time of his death Mr. Hutton was president of the 
Richmond City Water Works, of which he was the organizer. It 
was the old inspiration with him of doing good, and the importu- 
nity of friends, that caused him to become interested in the subject, 
and though past the allotted score of man's years, he grappled with 
the difficulties that continually beset the company and under his 
masterly hand the water works were completed to a very efficient 
state. He was liberal and philanthropic, but his actions in that 
direction were quiet and unostentatious, llis charities were many, 
he gave liberally to all worthy and needy causes, and in his old 
age death found him ready "to fold the drapery of his couch around 
him and lie down to pleasant dreams." He was a member of the 
llicksite Society of Friends and had an abiding faith in the funda- 
mental doctrines of the Society. The following tribute was paid 
him by one who had enjoyed an intimate acquaintance with him 
for a period of forty years: "He was an earnest and positive man. 
tenacious in his opinions and inflexible in his integrity, lie united 
with a strong will an amiability of manner which made him a com- 
panionable friend. His early life was a struggle, and for a man of 
his early opportunities he was a clear-headed reasoner, a discrimi- 
nating observer and an intelligent thinker, lie had positive opin- 
ions on all moral subjects and was a good hater, so to speak, of in- 
temperance. It was an inspiration with him as well as his beloved 
wife, who has just preceded him to a better world, to do good to 
others without parade or ostentation. It did his noble soul good, 
as he expressed it, to be able to assist the worthy and unworthy as 
well, as he would rather be imposed upon than fall short of what 
he considered a conscientious duty." In 1S42, Mr. Hutton was 
married to Miss Rebecca L. Shaw, who was burn in Waynesville, 
Warren county, Ohio, in September, 1821, and preceded her hus- 
band in death thirteen months, passing away at her home in Rich- 
mond, Feb. 23, 1885. She was among the most affectionate and 
tender of womankind, gifted in a remarkable degree with poetic 
taste, and a happy facility for expressing it. She wrote many beau- 
tiful tributes to the memory of those she loved and her published 
poems are familiar to Richmond readers. For more than forty 
years she and her husband pursued the journey of life together, 
loyally sharing each other's trials, sorrows and pleasures, and all 
who knew them loved, admired, and highly esteemed them. Their 
union was blessed by the birth of four children: Emily II. became 
the wife of Matthew H. Dill; Mary A. married John Shroyer; and 
Camilla R. married Rev. James D. Stanley; while the only son was 
William P. Hutton, a man of fine business talents, who occupied 
.the position of treasurer of the firm of J. M. Hutton & Company at 
the time of his death, which occurred Dec. 21, 1894. 

John M. Bond has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in the 
township of Webster the past twenty-two years and is one of the 
well known and highly esteemed citizens of the county. Mr. Bond 
was born near Carthage, in Rush county, Indiana, July 27, 1865,, 
a son of William and Sarah (Jessup) Bond, the former born in 



job 



Webster township, Wayne county, Oct. 13, 1838, and the latter in 
Carthage, Rush county, May 1, 1X37. The father is now living at 
Fountain City, the mother having died in 1908. William Bond is 
a son of Jesse Bond, a pioneer of Wayne count)' who immigrated 
from North Carolina. John NI. Bond secured his earl)- education 
in the Walnut Ridge district school, in Rush count)-, where he con- 
tinued to reside until 1890, when he came to Wayne county. Pre- 
vious to that time he had rented land from his father, beginning his 
independent career at the age of twenty, and in April, 1890, took up 
his residence on a farm which he had purchased in W r ebster town- 
ship, and that place has ever since represented his home, lie his 
the unequivocal confidence and esteem of the peoplpe of his section. 
and his farm of eighty acres is devoted to general agriculture and 
stock-raising. Mr. Bond is a stanch supporter of the principles and 
policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and has been 
an efficient worker in its cause, lie is a valued member of the local 
lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is 
trustee, ami has membership in the Rebekahs. On Feb. 3, 1887, Air. 
Bond was united in marriage to Miss Jennie L. Cheesman, born in 
Webster township, Oct. 6, 1864, a daughter of Vernon and Cath- 
erine (Longnecker) Cheesman, the former of whom died May 28, 
1909, and the latter resides in Webster township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bond have a daughter, Fannie A., born Oct. 1, 1889, wife of William 
J. Feasel. 

Jacob F. Fudge is one of the men who merits the high stand- 
ing accorded to him by the community in which he lives, for on all 
occasions his principles and actions have placed him among the most 
public-spirited and enterprising men of Webster township, lie was 
born in Randolph county, Indiana. Dec. 10. i860, and came to 
Wayne county in 1903. llis father, John K. Fudge, was born 111 
Preble county, Ohio, June 11, 1819, and his mother, Martha J. 
(Aker) Fudge, was born in that count)- and State, March (>, i8_»o. 
They were married in Treble count) and soon after that event came 
to Indiana, locating near "W inchester, in which vicinity they con- 
tinued to reside the residue of their lives, the father dying Feb. 20, 
1803, all( l tne mother, Feb. 16, 190(1. They became the parents of 
ten children: Melissa A., wife of George W. Piatt, a farmer in 
Franklin township, died March 3, 191 1; Joseph A. is deceased; the 
third child died in infancy, as also did James; John C. and Saphronia 
C. are deceased; Malinda is deceased; Jacob F. is the next in order 
of birth; and Margaret A. and Albert C. were twins, the former 
being the wife of Philip Miller, of New Mexico, and the latter is 
deceased. Jacob F. Fudge resided with his parents until twenty-one 
years old and during the last three years of that period operated his 
father's farm on shares. lie then worked for others until married, 
after which he rented land in Randolph count)- about eighteen years. 
In 1903 he came to Wayne count)' and rented a farm in Webster 
township three years. Then, after a year's residence in the village 
of Webster, he purchased the farm of 109 acres where he now re 
sides, and where he has since been engaged in general farming. On 
Dec. 19, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fudge and MP-, 



UIOGKAI'lUCAL 



Carrie 15. Miller, born in Randolph county, Dec. 23, 1865, daughter 
of John 11. and Elizabeth (Clear) Miller. Four children were the 
issue of this marriage: Oliver E., bom Jan. 17, 1888, married Miss 
Opal Hartup, resides in Richmond, and they have one child, Calvin 
W., born Dec. 12, 1907; Ada A., born Oct. 4, 1889, resides at the 
parental home, as do also Russell C, born Nov. 5, 1891, and Clar- 
ence O.j born Nov. 18, 1893. Mr. Fudge is a Democrat in politics. 
John [i. Miller, the father of -Mrs. Fudge, was born in Treble coun- 
ty, Ohio, Feb. 28, 1832. and the mother was also born in I'reble 
county, Ohio, March 8, 1833. The lather removed to Randolph 
county, Indiana, in early life, and there became a land-owner and 
lived the remainder of his days, lie served with an Indiana regi- 
ment during the latter part of the Civil war and his feet were seri- 
ously injured by marching and exposure, lie served one term as 
commissioner of Randolph county. He and his good wife were the 
parents of seven children: Margaret is deceased; Angeline is the 
widow of Richard Brown and resides in Winchester; Mary Jane is 
deceased; Philip married Margaret A. Fudge, a sister of the sub- 
ject of this review, and resides in the West; James R. is deceased; 
Mrs. Fudge is the next in order of birth; and George is a farmer 
and resides in Randolph count)'. 

Louis Homer Schepman, one of the representative citizens of 
Wayne county, for seven years maintained his home in the town- 
ship of Webster, where he conducted a line farm of eighty-five 
acres which he operated in a general way, but is now a resident 
of Wayne township, lie is another worthy representative of the 
sterling German families of the State of Indiana, where he has re- 
sided from the time of his birth, and has gained a position of inde- 
pendence through his own well directed endeavors. Mr. Schepman 
is a scion of staunch German slock in both the agnatic and ma- 
ternal lines, lie is a native of Wayne county, born four miles south 
of Richmond, Jan. 23, 1870, a son of John Henry and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Veregge) Schepman, natives of the Empire of Germany, the 
former born in Hanover, May 20, 1822, and the latter in Osnabruck, 
Nov. 7, 1827. John 11. Schepman learned the trade of a tailor with 
his wife's father, in Germany, serving an apprenticeship of four 
years, and followed that occupation in his native land one year 
longer. About 1840 he came to America and located at Cincinnati. 
Ohio, where he worked as a journeyman about four years and then 
engaged in business for himself, lie remained in Cincinnati until 
about 1854, when he came to Richmond and engaged in the tailor- 
ing business, continuing so employed until 1869, when he moved to 
a farm south of that city. lie followed agricultural pursuits six 
years and, in 1875, returned to Richmond, where he was engaged 
in the retail cigar and tobacco business about one year. He then 
re-engaged in the tailoring business, which he followed until his 
death, May 15, 1889, and his widow continued to reside in Richmond 
until her death, July 8. 1909. He was first a Republican, voting for 
Lincoln, but in later years became a Democrat, and he and his wife 
were German Lutherans in their religious views. They were the 
parents of twelve children: Theodore and the second born both 



'/OS MEMOIRS or WAYNE COUNTY 

(lied in infancy; Elizabeth is the widow of William Koeppc and 
resides in Evanston, 111.; John Henry, Jr., died Jan. 8, 1910; George 
\V. is engaged in the tailoring business in Richmond; Charle- died 
at the age of four years; Anna Mary Cornelia is the wife of J. Fred- 
crick Oesting, a grocer, of Richmond ; Rosena is the wife of Charles 
J I. Knollenberg, a machinist, of Evanston, ill.; Sarah Adeline is the 
wife of J. C. Slack, a barber, of Evanston', J 11.; Oran F. and Mabel 
are deceased; and Louis 11. is the youngest. Louis II. Schepman 
was reared to the tailoring business and his educational advantages 
in his youth were those afforded by the school- of Richmond, sup- 
plemented by a course in a business school in that city, lie con- 
tinued to devote his attention to the tailoring business, with his 
• father and brother, from the age of fifteen years until 1001, serving 
in every department of that trade, ami gained definite success 
through his indefatigable efforts and good management. In 1901 
he engaged in the florist business at Richmond and remained so 
employed until Feb. 21, 1904, when his plant was burned, lie then 
removed to Webster township, where he purchased a farm and de- 
voted his attention to general agricultural pursuits. He sold the 
farm 111 10.11 and has since resided on the David Sutton homestead, 
west of Richmond, on the National Road in Wayne township. As 
a citizen he commands the esteem and good will of the community, 
lie is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican 
partv. and himself and family are member- of the Friends' church. 
1.1c is a member of Webb Lodge, No. 24, Free and Accepted Masons. 
at Richmond. On June 14, 1S03, Mr. Schepman was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Tcnna McDonald, born in Richmond. Nov. 24, 1869, 
a daughter of Michael and Anna ( Edwards) McDonald, and of tin's 
union have been born four children — LeVern F., Arl McDonald. 
Vair Elizabeth, and Rhea Jennie. Michael McDonald, father of 
Mr-. Schepman, was an early resident of Richmond and received 
hi- education there. He joined the drum corps and seiwed in the 
I'niou arm)' during the Civil war. being under age at the time and 
running away from home to accomplish his desires. His father, 
|ohn McDonald, served four years in that conflict with a Richmond 
company. Michael McDonald died Jan. 1, 1010, at Dayton, Ohio, 
aged sixty-four years. To him and his wife were born three daugh- 
ters, two of whom died in infancy. The mother, Anna (Edwards') 
McDonald, died in Richmond, Sept. 6, 1871. at the age of twenty- 
two years. 

Horace H. Hunt, a leading farmer and representative citizen of 
the township of Webster, engaged in agricultural pursuits, is a 
scion of one of the honored pioneer families of Indiana, where his 
forebears took up their residence prior to the admission of the 
Territory to the Union. Horace 11. Hunt was born on a farm near 
where he resides, April 27. 1861, a son of Ammiel and Julia Lima 
1 Swain) Hunt, born in Franklin township, Wayne county. Ammiel 
Hunt was born in 1S22 and in early life was a teacher, also worked 
on a farm at intervals. After his marriage he purchased a farm 
south of the village of Webster and resided there about a year and 
a half, at the end of which period he removed to a farm one mile 



UIOGRAI'IIICAL JDi) 

north of the village. Later he purchased a farm adjoining, where 
his son Horace H. now resides, and resided there many years. 
Finally he purchased another farm adjoining and resided there until 
his death, at which time he owned 392 acres of land. He lived up 
to the full tension of the era and contributed his quota to the de- 
velopment and progress of what is now one of the most attractive 
and populous counties of the lloosier commonwealth. He was a 
man of forceful individuality and sterling integrity, so that he not 
only gained a due measure of success through his arduous and well 
directed efforts but also held the unqualified confidence and respect 
of his fellow men. His name merits an enduring place on the roll 
of the earnest and worthy pioneers who figured as founders and 
upbuilders of a great and prosperous State, lie continued to reside 
on his homestead' farm until his death, Oct. 10, 1870. The mother 
of Horace 11. Hunt died Jan. 11, 1875. The father was twice mar- 
ried and Horace 11. is one of six children born of the second union, 
being. the third in order of birth, lie was reared under the invig- 
orating and sturdy discipline of the home farm, where he waxed 
strong in mind and body while thus gaining deep appreciation of 
the dignity and value of honest toil and endeavor. His educational 
advantages were those afforded in the common schools of his native 
township and in a Quaker schooJ which his father had charge of 
in the village of Webster, and also took a course in the Richmond 
Business College Lie continued to be actively and successfully 
identified with agricultural pursuits, working for others from the 
age of eighteen to twenty-five. He then went to Marshall county, 
Kansas, rented a farm and resided there four years, at the end of 
which time he returned to Wayne county and resided with his wife's 
father two years. He then moved to the village of Webster, where he 
purchased a lot containing two and one-half acres and resided there 
about four years. In 1896 be traded places with his wife's father 
and came to the farm where he resides and which contains ninety- 
nine acres. It is one of the best equipped farms in the township, a 
new barn having been erected in 1008, and in [910 he erected one of 
the neatest and most modern dwellings in the community. Mr. 
Hunt is known as a citizen of marked loyalty and public spirit and 
shows a lively interest in all that tends to conserve the advance- 
ment and material prosperity of his home township and county. 
His political support is given to the Democratic party and he and 
his wife are zealous members of the Quaker church. On Jan. 20, 
188b, Mr. Hunt was united in marriage to Miss Laura l'>. 1 'aimer, 
born in Webster township, May 20, 1861, a daughter of Daniel and 
Martha (Smith) Palmer, early settlers of Wayne count)-, where the 
mother died March 7, iyoq, and the father resides with the family 
of Mr. Hunt. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hunt were born five 
children: Floyd II. married Miss Virgie Feasel, is a farmer, and 
resides in Boston township; Paul resides at the parental home, as 
do Harry and Helen. ■ Howard V., the first child, bom Xov. 17. 
1887, died May 5, 1888. Mr. Hunt is a member of Williamsburg 
Lodge, No. 493, Free and Accepted Masons, and of Webster Lodge, 
Xo. 371. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having passed through 



~\U MEMOIRS or WAYNE COUNTY 

the chairs of the local lodge of the last named organization. Daniel 
I 'aimer, father of Airs. Hunt, was born in Virginia, Dec. 26, 1826, 
and the mother in Columbiana count)-, Ohio, Sept. 17, 1830. The 
father came with his parents to Indiana when three years old and 
the family settled near Centerville, where he grew to the age of 
maturity, lie first worked for Norris Jones in a brick-yard, after 
which he was engaged with Thomas Gentry six years, lie then 
came to Webster township (then a portion of Green township) and 
purchased a farm, upon which he resided several years. In 1M70 he 
came to the farm where Mr. Hunt resides, having purchased the 
place at a commissioners' sale, and resided there until 1894, when 
he removed to Webster, and since the death of his wife has lived 
with his children, of whom there are four: Elva C. is the wife of 
Benjamin G. Price, of Richmond; Arthur 1!. is a resident of the 
village of Webster (see sketch) ; Mrs. Hunt is the next in order of 
birth ; and Joseph \V. is a farmer and resides in Webster township. 
Francis D. Jay, who has long maintained his home in the town- 
ship of Webster, is one of the honored citizens of Wayne county, 
where his paternal grandparents took up their abode in the early 
history of Indiana and the family has since continued to reside. lie 
was reared to manhood in and it has been his privilege to witness 
and aid in the development of this section, virtually on the frontier 
at the time when the family here located. He has made his life 
count for good in all its relations, has been progressive and public 
spirited, and has achieved a worthy success in temporal affairs, the 
while commanding the unequivocal confidence and esteem of his 
fellow men. In according recognition to such sterling citizens a 
publication of this nature exercises its supreme function. Mr. Jay 
was born in Webster township, Wayne county, Aug. 14, 1857, the 
eldest of the three sons of Henry and Alice ( Hollinpsworth) Jay, 
born in Warren county, Ohio, the father on Aug. 31, 1813, and the 
mother on Feb. 28, 183S. Henry Jay came to Indiana when thirteen 
years old with his parents, who first located on the State line, near 
Xew Paris, Ohio, where the son grew to maturity. In early man- 
hood he removed to Webster township, became a land-owner, and 
there he and his devoted wife passed the residue of their lives. They 
bore the burdens and endured the vicissitudes common to the era in 
which the}' lived, showing courage and fortitude, laboring hide 
fatigably and eventually gaining reward for their earnest endeavors. 
Their lives were guided and governed by the highest principles of 
honor and integrity and they held at all times the implicit confi- 
dence and regard of the community in which they so long made 
their home. The father died in August, 1891, and the mother passed 
away in the winter of 1874. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren : Francis D. is the eldest ; Dayton is deceased ; and William 
II. II. is a farmer and resides in Webster township. The father 
had been previously married three times, and of those unions were 
born six children, two of whom are living — Dewitt C. and Sarah J., 
the latter of whom is the wife of Lindley Rond, of Green township. 
Francis I). Jay passed his childhood days in Webster township, 
where he received his rudimentary education in the common schools, 



MOGRAIUITCAL /II 

also attending one winter in Ohio. His services were early called 
into requisition in connection with the work of the home farm and 
his memory hears record of the strenuous toil involved in reclaim- 
ing land from the primeval forest. After he attatined years of ma- 
turil) he initiated farming operations in an independent way, and 
thus his labors continued to he arduous and unceasing while gain- 
ing a "start in life" and proving his mettle as one of the world's 
noble army of workers. By every reason of energy, good judgment 
and consecutive application, his success was cumulative, and he 
lias keen in the most emphatic sense the maker of the competency 
which he enjoys at the present time, when the shadows of his life 
lengthen from the Golden West, lie resided with his father until 
twenty years old and then worked for his grandfather one year, at 
the end of which time he returned to the parental home and worked 
his father's farm about five years, lie then purchased a farm in 
Green township, where he resided about seven years and then moved 
hack If) Webster township and purchased the farm upon which he 
resides, consisting of ninety acres, which is devoted to general 
farming and stock-raising, in which line he has attained to a high 
reputation and made a distinctive success. Mr. Jay has never wav- 
ered in his allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, lie is 
prominently identified with the Farmers' .Mutual Protective Asso- 
ciation. ( hi March 8, [883, Mr. Jay was united in marriage to Miss 
Hannah Alhertson, horn at Green's Fork, Clay township, Feb. 18, 
[856. a daughter of Ehvood and Mary (Williams) Alhertson, the 
former horn in Clay township, Dec. 9, 1817, and the latter in Penn- 
sylvania, April 7, 1821. The father resided at the old Alhertson 
homestead in Clay township until the death of his parents, when 
he became the owner of the farm and continued to reside thereon 
until his death, in 1885. His wife died in 1904, having remained 
on the old homestead several years and then removed to Green's 
Fork, where she died. They were the parents of four children: 
Oliver C. is living retired in Richmond; Mrs. Jay is the second in 
order of birth; Albert R. is the present treasurer of Wayne count} - ; 
and Bailey is a carpenter and resides in San Francisco. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jay hecame the parents of two children: llerschel, born March 
10, 1S84, died on Sept. to of the same year; and Herbert, born May 
it, 1885, resides on his father's farm and operates heavy machinery, 
threshing machinery, etc. Me married Harriet Snyder, born in 
Richmond, Feb. t8, 1889, and they have a child, Elizabeth Evelin, 
horn June 2, 1908. Mrs. Francis f). Jay is a member of the Ladies' 
Aid Society and she and her husband are birthright members of 
the Friends' church. 

Arthur B. Palmer is known as one of the representative busi- 
ness men of Wayne county and his popularity is measured only 
by the circle of his acquaintances. He conducts a prosperous coal, 
tile, and fertilizer business in the village of Webster and is the 
owner of a valuable farm which has been nicely improved through 
his able and discriminating supervision and control. Mr. Palmer 
finds a due measure of pride and satisfaction in referring to the 
old Tloosier State as the place of nativity. He was bom in Web- 



/I2 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

ster township, one mile north of the village of Webster, Sept. 3, 
1858, a son of Daniel and Martha (Smith) Palmer (see sketch of 
Horace H. Hunt). Arthur B. Palmer passed his boyhood and youth 
on the homestead farm in Webster township and there received 
his preliminary educational training in the public schools and in 
the old Quaker school in the village of Webster. At the age of 
twenty-one years he began his independent career, though he 
worked for his father two years after reaching his majority. He then 
rented land of his father two years, after which he removed to near 
Green's Fork, where he lived on a farm one year, lie then re- 
turned to Webster township and rented his grandfather's farm a 
period of six years, at the end of which time he purchased a part 
of the place, consisting of thirty-five acres, to which he added 
from time to time until he now owns 150 acres, lie resided on his 
farm until 1907, when he took up his residence in the village of 
Webster, where he has since maintained his home, having gained 
independence and definite success through his own well directed 
efforts. As before stated, he is engaged in the coal, tile, and fer- 
tilizer business, and in this controls a large and representative 
patronage. By fair dealing and unfailing courtesy he has gained 
a secure hold upon the confidence and esteem of the people of the 
community, and thus the success of his business enterprise has 
been cumulative. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, having passed through the chairs of the local or- 
ganization, Webster Lodge, No. 371, and he and "Sirs. Palmer are 
members of Rebekah Lodge, No. 594. The local camp of the Re- 
publican party finds one of its loyal members in the person of 
Mr. Palmer, and he is now township chairman of the Republican 
Central Committee. He and his wife are members of the Friends' 
church. Sept. 13, 1881, recorded the marriage of Mr. Palmer to 
Miss Louisa C. Bond, born near Green's Fork, this county, March 
10, 1859. Sl ie > s a daughter of John and Thomzy Ann (Chees- 
man) Bond, both of whom died in Clay township. John Bond was 
born near Green's Fork, March 8, 1828, a son of Robert and Rachel 
(Thornburgh) Bond, and lived his entire life in Clay township. 
He was one of the leading farmers of this section of the count)' 
and held the unequivocal regard of all who knew him. The mother 
of Mrs. Palmer was born in Center township, (Jet. 22, 1835, an< 3 
died Sept. 15, 1873. She was a daughter of Ebenezer and Jane 
(Culbertson) Cheesman, early settlers in Center township, this 
county. Mr. Cheesman was one of the leading farmers of his 
time, was very prompt in all his dealings and well respected by 
all who knew him. On Oct. 5, 1875, John Bond was married to 
Malissa A. Stiggleman, daughter of John Stiggleman, of Henry 
county, Indiana, and she, with their son, Lawrence, and daughter, 
Marie H., resides at the old homestead in Clay township. The 
father passed away Feb. 13, 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Palmer 
became the parents of a son, Clarent Louis, born May 7, 1886. His 
boyhood days were spent with his parents on the farm where he 
now resides. He received his education in the Webster school, 
graduating in the common school in 1901, and completing the four 



BIOGRAPHICAL 713 

years' high school course in 1905. On Sept. (>, 1905, he was mar- 
ried to Mary Elizabeth Crawford, born March 10, 18S7, a daughter 
of Charles and Emily (Snyder) Crawford, of Wayne township, this 
county. Clarent L. Palmer took the commercial course at the Rich- 
mond Business College, and after a few months spent in Rich- 
mond they returned to the old homstead, in November, 1007. and 
there he is engaged in farming anil the breeding of nne Duroc 
hogs and Barred Plymouth Rock chickens. The)- have two chil- 
dren: Dudley Clarent. bom July 24, 1906, and Lester Crawford, 
born June 23, 190S. Clarent L. Palmer is a member of Webster 
Lodge, No. 371, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having passed 
through the chairs of that organization, and he and his wife are 
members of the Webster lodge of Rebekahs, she having passed 
through the chairs of that order. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Palmer 
are prominent in the social life of the community and their house 
is known for its gracious hospitality. 

Elijah Cooper, a retired farmer of Webster, is one of the 
representative men of that thriving village and is a member of one 
of the honored pioneer families of Butler county, Ohio, being a 
scion of the third generation. .Mr. Cooper was born on a farm in 
Preble county, Ohio, and the date of his nativity is .March 25, 
1840. lie is a son of William and Elizabeth (Kellum) Cooper, the 
former born in Butler county, Ohio, and the latter in Preble count}', 
in the same State. The father devoted practically his enure life 
to agricultural pursuits, in connection with which he attained to 
a due measure of success, and died in August, 1 S7 5 , in Butler 
county, Ohio, where he was the owner of a valuable farm. The 
mother died about 1891, ami they were the parents of four chil- 
dren ; Jonathan was killed by a saw-log when about fourteen years 
old; Sarah Jane became the wife of Milton Stubbs and resided in 
Kansas, where she died in 1910; Esther is the widow of Joseph 
Stubbs and resides in Preble county, Ohio; and Elijah is the young- 
est. Elijah passed his boyhood days on the home farm and his 
educational training was secured in the public schools of Preble 
and Butler counties, Ohio. lie resided at home until twenty- 
three years old and then engaged in farming on a place given him 
by his father, in Butler county, Ohio, and there resided .six years, 
lie then rented that farm out and purchased another in the same 
county, upon which place he resided three years, and removed to 
Wayne county, Indiana, and located just west of Richmond, where 
he resided two years, having disposed of his Butler county farm. 
He then removed to Preble county, Ohio, where he purchased a 
farm and resided eight years, at the end of which time he removed 
to Trenton, Butler county, Ohio, where he purchased another 
farm. He resided there nine years and then removed to Eaton, 
in the same county, where he lived retired about six months, and 
then moved again to Wayne county, Indiana, locating four miles 
southeast of Richmond, lie resided at this place three years and 
then purchased a farm in New Garden township, where he resided 
nine years, after which he sold his farm and removed to the village 
of Webster. Later, he purchased a farm three miles northwest 



\\ AY.NK CO UN" 



of that village, in Webster township, but after living there six 
months sold that place and moved into Center township, where he 
purchased a farm and resided two years. He then purchased a farm 
in Webster township, the tract consisting" of io(> acres, but soon 
thereafter rented it and purchased the residence which he occupies 
in the village of Webster. The subject of this review is aligned 
as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican part}- and 
served two terms as trustee uf Gratis township, Preble county, 
Ohio, besides serving as supervisor in Wayne township, Butler 
county, and as a member uf the school board in Gratis township, 
Preble county. On Oct. 10, 1863, Mr. Cooper was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Amy A. Conarroe, born in Butler county, Ohio, Dec. 
31, 1846, a daughter of John and Harriet (Swain) Conarroe, of thai 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have five children : William, born 
.Vug. 17, 1864, married Lina Gunkle, is a farmer and resides at 
Fountain City; Jennie, born Aug. ^o, 1867, is the wife of William 
G. Angspurger, a farmer in Webster township ; John E., burn March 
7, 1874, married Ida Ritter and resides in Chicago ; Clarence J., born 
Oct. 14, 1879, married Pearl Yoss and resides in Richmond; and 
Letha, born Dec. 12, 1883, is the wife of Robert 11. Commons, a 
farmer, of Wayne township. 

James Monroe Nutter is numbered among the successful and 
progressive farmers of Wayne county, and his well improved farm, 
upon which he is now living practically retired, is located in Web- 
ster township, near the village of Webster. He is a son of the late 
Benjamin and Amy (Sullivan) Nutter, the former born in Union 
county, Indiana, in 1809, and the latter in North Carolina. The 
paternal grandparents came to Indiana from Maine, and Benjamin 
Nutter became an extensive land-owner in Union count}', where 
he resided until his death, in 1856. his widow surviving until 1898. 
They were the parents of eleven children, of whom the subject of 
this review is the fourth in order of birth. James M. Nutter re- 
verts to fair Union county as the place of his nativity, born Nov. 
3, 1837. tie received his early educational training in the schools 
of his native county and was about nineteen years of age at the 
time of his father's death, when he took charge of the farm. At 
about that time he also learned the carpenters' trade, and in 1886 
removed to Jay count}', where he resided six months. He then re- 
moved to Miami count}', where he resided fourteen years, and then 
came to Wayne count}- and located on the farm where he resides. 
It consists of forty-nine and one-half acres of land in Webster 
township, which he rents out by the field, and is living essentially 
retired. In politics Mr. Nutter is found arrayed as a staunch sup 
porter of the cause of the Republican party. On Nov. 5, [876, was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Matilda Pearson, born at Dub- 
lin, Wayne county, Feb. 25, 1853. a daughter of Isaac and Mar- 
garet (Smith) Pearson, natives of Union county, the former born 
May 12, 1824, and the latter May 28, 1825, and of this union were 
born two children — Margaret and Paul. Margaret, born Aug. 24, 
1877, was married on Oct. 11, 1899, to B. H. Stewart,' and they have 
three children — James D., Dorothy, and Dale. I 'aid, born fan. iu, 



i88o, is in Los Angeles, Cal. Isaac Pearson, lather of Mrs. Nutter, 
served one year in the Civil war as a member of Company 1), Eighth 
Indiana infantry, being discharged on account of illness, lie died 
Dec. (>, 1909, and his wife died Jan. 28, 1904. They were the 
parents of eight children, four of whom are living. 

James B. Brown, of Webster township, is one of the best known 
of Wayne county farmers, ranks high as an agriculturist, and is 
one of the leading citizens of that community. [lis father, Wil- 
liam Drown, was an early settler of Abington township. lie was 
born in Glasgow, Scotland, came to America with his parents when 
twelve years old, and spent the remainder of his days in Indiana, 
his life being replete with good work and deeds for his fellow 
men. lie early assumed the responsibilities of life in his own be- 
half, and from a beginning as a teamster between Union county 
and Cincinnati, and as a laborer by the month, was soon possessed 
of a farm in Abington township, Wayne county, where his later 
days were spent and his death occurred, lie was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ann Wood, of Chion count}', Indiana, horn of Irish 
parentage, and she died Oct. 17, 1897, having become the mother of 
eight children: William and Sarah are deceased; James 1'.. is the 
next in order of birth ; Carrie is the wife of John Fender, a real- 
estate dealer in Centerville : Charles is a farmer and resides in 
Union county; Frank D. is a candy manufacturer and resides in 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Mattie is the wife of Celie Robbins, a farmer in 
Minnesota; and Flora M. is the wife of Hamilton Squires, a farmer 
residing at Green's Fork. James P>. Rrown was born in Abing- 
ton township, Oct. 31, 1854, and has spent a goodly portion of his 
life in Wayne county, now owning one of the fine farms which 
make this county famous for its agricultural products. The edu- 
cational advantages which he enjoyed were those afforded by the 
schools in Abington township. His inclinations were along the 
line of agriculture. He resided with his father until twenty-two 
years old, and has made the cultivation of the soil his life's work. 
I 'lion initiating his independent career he rented land in Abing- 
ton township about three years and then purchased the farm now 
occupied by Joshua N. Swallow, in that township. After residing 
on that place about ten years he sold it and moved to Union 
count}-, where he resided a little more than ten years, and then 
came to Webster township and located on the farm where he re- 
sides. His landed possessions comprise 315 acres in Webster town- 
ship, constituting one of the ideal farmsteads of that section, and 
160 acres one-half mile north of Richmond, which he has rented. 
.Mr. Ilrown is a careful farmer, getting the best of results front the 
tilling of his land, but what is more important, he is a good and 
generous citizen and has the respect and good will of a wide cir- 
cle of friends and acquaintances. He is extremely generous by 
nature and no worthy cause or person has ever been refused as- 
sistance by him ; and as a public citizen he has always been active 
in the upbuilding of his township and county. He is broad-minded 
in all his views, an excellent conversationalist, and is one of the 
most prominent men in that section of the count}. On Sept. 28, 



/lf> MEMOIRS oi- U'AYNK COUNTY 

1882, he was married to Miss Mary Colvin, a sister of Josiah li. 
and Robert 15. Colvin (see sketches). Of this union were born 
four children : Richard, born Aug. 5, 1883, resides at the parental 
home; Walter, born April 27, 1889, is employed in Richmond ; 
Medie, born June, 7, 1 89 r , and Esther, born June 17, 1893, reside at 
home with their parents. 

Jonathan Mendenhall.— When it is stated that this well known 
carpenter and respected citizen of Webster township is a represen- 
tative of the third generation of the Mendenhall family in Wayne 
county it becomes evident that he is a scion of stock here founded 
111 the early pioneer era. In short, the family name became identi- 
fied with the annals of this section of Indiana soon after the ad- 
mission of the Slate to the Union. Mr. .Mendenhall was born on 
the farm where he resides. June 15, 1850, a son of Nathan and 
Rhoda R. (Bond) Mendenhall, the former bom in North Carolina, 
in 1820. and the latter in Webster township, Wayne county In- 
diana, in 1824. Xathan Mendenhall was a son (if Jonathan' and 
Charity Ann (Philips) Mendenhall, who immigrated to Indiana 
when their son was six years old and located on a farm south of 
Greens Fork, in 1826. To the reclamation of his land |onathan 
Mendenhall turned his attention, ami he developed his property 
into a reasonably productive farm, lie and his good wife reared 
their family there, but later resided a time on the farm now occu- 
pied by their grandson, Jonathan, and still later removed to Hamil- 
ton county, where they spent the remainder of their days with a 
son. Xathan Mendenhall was reared to maturity on the old home- 
stead farm, in whose work he early began to assist, and his early 
educational privileges were those afforded in the pioneer schools of 
Clay township. 1 lis entire active career was devoted to agricultural 
pursuits and he was the owner of forty-eight acres of land in 
Webster township at the time of his death, in [898. His .widow 
still resides with her son, Jonathan, and of their seven children 
three survive the honored father: Harvey and Samuel are de- 
ceased ; Jonathan is the next in order of birth ; Clayton is deceased ; 
Charity Ann is the wife of Henry Atkinson, a farmer in Webster 
township; Marietta is the wife of Nathan E. Overman, a carpenter 
contractor, of Richmond; and one child died in infancy. In Web- 
ster township Jonathan Mendenhall was reared and educated duly 
availing himself of the advantages of the public schools He be- 
gan his independent career by working as a farm hand and while 
still a young man served an apprenticeship to the carpenter's and 
plasterer's trades, in each of which he became a skilled workman 
During all of his active career he has followed these trades, al- 
though he owns forty-eight acres of land in Webster township 
the fields of which he rents out, and he resides on the farm, giv- 
ing some attention to stock-raising. His energy and discriminate 
management have brought to him a due measure of success and he 
is one of the independent and progressive mechanics of the county, 
where he has always merited and held popular confidence and es- 
teem, lie is a Republican in his political proclivities and he and 
his wile hold membership in the Quaker church. In fune 1874 



;k.\imi icai 



Mr. Mendenhall was united in marriage to Miss Martha Catey, born 
in Green township, this county, in 1853, a daughter of Samuel and 
Priscilla (Mullen) Catey, who spent their active lives in Green 
township and became the parents of seven children. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mendenhall have two children: Marl C., born June 29, 1876, resides 
in Winchester, Ind., is married to Olive Hoover, born April 11, 
1X78, daughter of Martin and Helena A. Hoover, of Randolph 
count)', and they have three children — K. Lee, born Nov. 14, 1809, 
Reba 11., bom June 17, 1905, and M. Tuanita, born Aug. 31, 1907; 
Willetta, born July 21, 1883, is the wife of Lawrence O. Clark, of 
Richmond, and they have three children— Hazel, born June 7, 1900, 
Gladys, born Oct. 8, 1902, and Treva, born May 26. 1905. 

George W. Pitts, of Webster township, is one of the represen- 
tative fanners of Wayne county and views with satisfaction the 
fact that he is a native son of the Hoosier State, where he has 
ever made his home and has achieved definite and worthy success 
as a reliable and enterprising farmer. lie was born in Green 
township, Wayne county. Jan. 8, 1859. son of Harmon and Ruth 
(Knight) Litis, the former born in Guilford county, North Caro- 
lina, in 1823. and the latter in Grant count)', Indiana. The paternal 
grandparents were Samuel and Martha (Meredith) Pitts. Samuel 
Pitts was born in 1/93. an d in 1815 was married to Martha [Mere- 
dith, a daughter of David and Polly ( Farriiigton 1 Meredith. In 
1830, with a family of six children, they immigrated to Wayne 
county, Indiana, and settled in New Garden township (now a por- 
tion of Webster) and resided there about one year. The) then 
moved to another farm in New Garden township, where the 
parents spent the residue of their lives. Six children were born to 
them in Wayne count) and all lived to maturity. The father died 
in the eightieth year of his age and the mother two years later at 
about the same age. The} - were members of the Society of Friends 
and their children adhered to the same faith. Harmon Pitts came 
to Indiana with his parents and remained with them until his mar- 
riage, when he settled in Green township, purchasing eighty acres 
of land, lie was prudent and industrious and devoted his entire 
active career to farming, owning 250 acres of land when he died, in 
March, 1907. lie was married in 1846 to Ruth, daughter of Thomas 
and Christina (Thomas) Knight, and they became the parents of 
eight children: Oliver II. is living retired in Fountain City; Wil- 
liam is a farmer and resides one and one-half miles south of Rich- 
mond : Beulah Ann became the wife of John II. Green, of Green 
township, and died in February, 1911 ; Thomas C. resides with his 
brother William 111 Wayne township; and Benjamin and Isaac ]. 
are twins, the former residing in Wayne township and the latter 
in New Garden township (see sketch of Isaac J. Pitts 1. The mother 
of these children died in 1878, and in 1880 Harmon Pitts married 
Mary, daughter of Davis Pegg. and widow of William Kulghcr. 
In the public schools of New Garden and (been townships George 
W. Pitts secured his earl)' educational discipline, and he resided 
at home until twenty-one years^okl. lie then worked for his father 
about five years, and after his marriage continued on the home- 



718 MEMOIRS Of WAV NIC COUNTY 

stead in Green township one year. He then moved to New Garden 
township and lived on his father's farm there about fifteen years, at 
the end of which time he purchased a farm in Webster township, 
which he rented to another, lie later sold this farm and purchased 
the farm which he had previously occupied in Xew Garden town- 
ship, and after residing there about two year's sold it and pur- 
chased another farm in Webster township, where he resided five 
years, lie then sold that place and purchased the farm of eighty- 
one acres where he resides, in Webster township, and this he farms 
in a general way, including the raising of stock Air. Pitts is 
found arrayed as a loyal supporter of the principles and policies 
of the Republican party, and he and his wife are members of the 
Friends' church. Oct. u, 1S88. will ever remain a memorable 
date in the life history of Mr. Pitts, since it was that on which was 
solemnized his marriage to Miss Wilhelmina Steddom, born in 
Warren county, Ohio, July 7, i860, a daughter of Isaac P. G. and 
Lucinda (Puckett) Steddom (see sketch of Isaac P. G. Steddom). 
Of the union of Air. and Airs. Pitts was born a daughter, Lucile, 
July 26, 1889. who is a teacher of instrumental music, and she re- 
sides at the parental home, having been educated in Richmond. 

Isaac Pedric Compton Steddom, one of the most highly re- 
spected citizens of Webster township ami a former merchant and 
postmaster at the village of Webster, was horn near Lebanon, 
Ohio, March i, 1841. His father was John F. Steddom, a promi- 
nent citizen of Warren county, Ohio, born in 1819, and (lied in 
1878. His mother was Mary Ann (Compton) Steddom, born in 
Ohio, in 1820, and she died in 1852. Isaac P. G. Steddom was 
eleven years old when his mother died, lie received an excellent 
educational training in the schools of Ohio and subsequently at- 
tended Farlham College, to which institution of learning lie was 
sent by his aunt, Maria Compton, as was also his brother William 
and sister Anna. During his earl) life he made his home with his 
grandfather, Samuel Steddom, on a farm near Lebanon, Warren 
county, Ohio, and when he reached maturity took charge of the 
farm of many acres, partially under cultivation, and continued to 
manage it until Jan. 9, 18O7. He then moved to Wayne count)-. 
Indiana, where he rented a farm in Webster township seven years. 
He then rented a farm of his father-in-law in the same township 
one year, and in 1876 moved to the village of Webster, where he 
has continuously resided since. For years he gave his attention 
to carpentering and contracting work, and he conducted a general 
store in Webster four years, serving as postmaster at the same time, 
and he retired from both duties in 1910. In politics he is allied 
with the Republican party and has always taken an active interest 
in the welfare of the community, having served as justice of the 
peace fourteen consecutive years. He is associated with the 
Friends' church. On June 24, 1 865, Mr. Steddom was united in 
marriage to Miss Lucinda Puckett, of Randolph county. She is a 
daughter of Nathan and Elizabeth (Knight) Puckett, who came 
from North Carolina to Randolph county, where the father farjned 
many years. He later purchased a farm in Wayne county, adjoin- 



ing the present home of George \Y. L J itls, and there the mother 
died, May 1, 1876, aged sixty-seven years. Mr. l'uckctt then re- 
turned to Randolph county and spent the residue of his life at the 
home of his son, dying March 28, 1894, at the age of eighty-seven 
years. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, all of 
whom are deceased with the exception of .Mrs. Steddom, who was 
born Nov. 1, 1841, and was educated in Randolph and Wayne 
counties. One of the sons, Calvin, was a veteran of the Civil war 
and served as commissioner of Randolph county. Of the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Steddom were born six children: Wilhelmina, born 
July 7, 1866, is the wife of George \Y. I'itts (see sketch); Cora, 
"born June 24, 1867, is the widow of Charles l>artlemay, of Goshen, 
Ind., where she has been a teacher in the Goshen schools the past 
twenty years, and she has a son, Charles; William Orange, born 
April 4, 1869, is a carpenter and contractor at Richmond and is 
married to Elnora Tingler; John F., born March 20, 1874, mar- 
ried Grace Duke and they have four children — Lewis, Lowell, Ken- 
neth, aYid Mabel V. ; and Calvin and Clarkson are twins, born Jan. 
14, 1878, the latter died March 6, 1900, and the former is married to 
Helen Catanaugh and they have two daughters — Margaret and 
Elenore. 

William Moore, a popular citizen of Webster township, is one 
of the successful farmers of the younger generation in his native 
count) - and is known as an able and discriminating agriculturist 
and as one who enjoys in marked degree the esteem of his fellow 
men. He was born in Wayne township, this county, Aug. 4. 1870, 
a son of Benjamin and Sarah (McWhinney) Moure, the former 
born in this county, Jan. 1, 1837, and the latter at West Florence, 
Ohio, March 30, 1836, so that in the paternal line the subject of this 
sketch is a representative of the third generation in Wayne 
county and a representative of a pioneer family of this section of 
the State. Benjamin Moore was always a farmer by occupation 
and also operated a saw mill and threshing machinery to some 
extent. In the fall of 1873 he located on the farm now owned by 
his son William, and he also owned a farm in Preble county, Ohio, 
although he lived there only a few months, lie died Dec. 2, 1905, 
his wife having passed away, March 2<). 1891. Of their two 
children, William is the eldest, and Harry, born July 6, 1874, died 
Dec. 2, 1899. William Moore was reared to maturity in Webster 
township and there duly availed himself of the advantages of the 
public schools, and when twelve years old began working for others 
as a farm hand, also working with threshing machine--. Me worked 
for others until married and then rented his father's farm until 1906. 
On May 14, of that year, he purchased the old homestead, consist- 
ing of ninety acres of land, and this he operated in a general way. 
In politics Mr. Moore is a staunch advocate of the principles of the 
Republican party and is the incumbent of the office of supervisor 
of District No. 1. lie is affiliated with the Masonic order, Lodge 
No. 067, and also the Independent Order of odd Fellows. Lodge 
No. 371, being a I'ast Grand in the local organization of the last 
named fraternity. On Line 2S, 1801, Mr. Moore was united in' 



7-20 MEMOIRS OF W'AV.XF. COUNTY 

marriage to Miss Florence E. Sullivan, burn in Webster township, 
Dee. 15. 1869, a daughter of John Wesley and Annie (Overman) 
Sullivan, natives of Webster township. Of the children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Sullivan, Mrs. Moore is the eldest; Mary C. is the wife of 
Arthur T. King, a barber, of Richmond; and J. Everett is a book- 
keeper and resides in West Richmond. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have 
twu children — Dayton Ivan, born May 16, 1892. and Llenjamin 
Lewi-, born Nov. 17, 1894. The father of Mrs. Moore was born 
Jan. 4. 1847, am ' tne mother on April 24, 184S. In early life the 
father learned the carpenter trade, which he has always followed, 
although he owns and lives on a farm in Webster township. 

William Henry Harrison Jay is numbered among the success- 
ful farmers and stuck growers of Webster township and is a scion 
of one of the sterling pioneer families of Indiana, lie was born in 
Webster township, May _>s. 1867, a son of Henry and Alice (Hol- 
lingsworth) Jay (see sketch of Francis 1). Jay). William II. II. 
Jay was reared to the life of the farm and secured his early educa- 
tional training in the schools of the village of Webster. lie con- 
tinued to be associated with his father in farming operations until 
twenty-one years old, when he received an interest in the home- 
stead and also rented land and engaged in farming from that time 
011. residing on his farm of ninety-four acres, one of the fine farms 
of the county, which he operates in a general way. Though not 
active in political affairs, Mr. Jay gives loyal support to the cause 
of the Republican party, and holds membership in the Dover 
Friends' Church of Webster. In 1893 Mr. Jay was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lulu Atkinson, bom in Webster township, Sept. 6, 
[875, daughter of Henry and Charity Ann (Mendenhall) Atkinson, 
well known residents of Wayne count}'. Loth are living and are 
the parents of two children — Mrs. Jay and Charles, the son being 
a carpenter contractor and a resident of the village of Webster. 
Mr-. Jay died in November, 1900, having become the mother of two 
>ons — Adelbert Henry, who resides with his uncle, Francis D. Jay ; 
and Herschel IX, who resides with Ids grandparents. Mr. Jay L a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 591, 
at Webster. 

John Flatley left upon the civic and business annals of the 
township of Webster a definite impress for good and long stood as 
one of the representative citizens of Wayne county, where the 
major portion of his life was passed. lie continued his residence 
in Webster township until his death, Feb. 14, 1010, and his name 
is there held in lasting honor. John Flatley was born near the 
Chapel of Nock, in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1837., a son of William 
and Jennie Flatley, natives of the Emerald Isle, where they spent 
the entire period of their lives. John Flatley came to America at 
the age of twenty-five years and first located in the city of Rich- 
mond, where he worked in Patterson's plow shop continuously until 
1S8C He then purchased the farm where his family resides, in 
Webster township, which tract consists of 330 acres of land. 
Turning his attention to agricultural pursuits, he was thereafter 
identified with that line of enterprise during" the remainder of his 



active career. He operated the farm with the aid of his sons and 
also engaged in stock-raising, making a specialty of Poland-China 
hogs. He was a man who ever commanded popular confidence and 
esteem and his circle of friends was particularly wide. An old log 
cabin was the only dwelling house on his farm when he purchased 
it, in 1886, and he erected the present buildings and put the place 
in modern shape, through hard work and industry: He earned all 
he possessed, assisted by his good wife. On Sept. 6, 1878, Mr. Flat- 
lev was united in marriage to Bridget Henry, born in County Mayo,' 
Ireland, Jan. I, 1859, a daughter of Edward and Katharine (Mad- 
den) Henry, who lived out their lives in their native land. When 
Mrs. Flatley was fourteen years old she came to America with a 
Mrs. Sheridan and a Mrs. Welsh, a sister living in .Madison hav- 
ing preceded her to America, and she worked in a private family 
until her marriage. Jn conclusion is entered brief record concern- 
ing the children of Mr. and Mrs. Flatley: John, born July 31, 
1879, resides with his mother; Edward, born May 31, 1881, died 
Oct. 20, 1898; William, born July 15, 1883, resides with his mother, 
as do also Peter, born Sept. 15, 1885, and Luke, born May 20, 1887. 
The sons operate the homestead for their mother. Mr. Flatley was 
and the surviving members of his family are members of St. Mary's 
Catholic Chinch, of Richmond, and his remains lie in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. The last few years of his life were spent in retirement, 
owing to an accidental fall which crippled him for the last ten 
years of his life. He was a member of the Democratic partv and 
was very active in its behalf. 

John D. Crowe was born at Centerville, Wayne county, March 
2, 1858, the first born of the union of Nelson and Margaret (Smith) 
Crowe, the former born in Center township, this county, Sept. 6, 
1826, and the latter in Boston township, this county, Oct. 1, 1834. 
In early life the father learned the trade of a blacksmith and fol- 
lowed that occupation at Centerville until 1862, when he purchased 
a farm in Boston township and engaged in farming there until his 
death, Jan. 3, 1908, his wife having passed away Oct. 5, 1881. They 
were the parents of seven children: John D. is the eldest; George 
W. is a farmer and resides near Denver, Col.; Frank is a musician 
and resides in Albuquerque, X. M. ; Schuyler resides in New Cas- 
tle, Ind. ; Walter W. is an electrician and is also engaged in the 
orchard business in Oregon; Luella is the wife of Herbert E. 
Drulcy, of Richmond; and Clark is a farmer and resides in Boston 
township. John D. Crowe remained with his father until 1876 and 
then started out in life for himself, going first to the city of Rich- 
mond, where he secured employment in the Sedgwick fence fac- 
tory and remained with that concern seventeen years, having charge 
of the erection of the wire machines, etc. The concern having been 
purchased by other parties and removed to Detroit, Mich., Mr. 
Crowe removed to that city and resided there four years, serving 
in the capacity of foreman of the fence department of the factory. 
He then returned to Wayne county and engaged in farming upon 
the place where he resides. It consists of 185 acres, lie owns' 
property in Richmond and in Boston township. On Oct. 5, 1886, 



722 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Mr. Crowe was married to Miss Elizabeth M. Smith, born near 
the village of Boston, in Boston township, Aug. 27, 1862. She is 
a daughter of William W. and Susannah (Ilayhow) Smith, both 
of English birth and possessing all the substantial and reliable 
traits of that nationality. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Crowe 
were born three children: Smith N., born Nov. I, 1889, is a stu- 
dent in the Rose polytechnic school at Terre Haute, Ind., fitting 
himself for a civil engineer; Herbert W., born Aug. 29, 1891, grad- 
uated in the high school at Webster with the class of 1910 and is 
now a student at Earlham ; and Margaret, born April 17, 1905. Mr. 
Crowe is a member of the United Presbyterian church at Rich- 
mond and in politics is a Republican. William W. Smith, the 
father of Mrs. Crowe, was born in Lincolnshire, England, Sept. 14, 
1834, and the mother was born in the same place on March 24 of 
the same year. The father came to America in the spring of 1861 
and located in Boston township, Wayne county, and he farmed 
rented land in Boston and Center townships until 1873, when he 
purchased the farm where his son-in-law, Mr. Crowe, resides. There 
his death occurred July 25, 1903, and his widow is a member of the 
household of Mr. Crowe, aged seventy-seven years. She first 
came to America with some friends in 1853, but returned to Eng- 
land in i860, and in 1861 again came to America. 

DeWitt Clinton Jay, .one of the representative farmers of his 
native county, is the owner of a fine homestead in Webster town- 
ship and there follows general farming, in which his operations 
have been attended with distinctive success. 1 fe is a member of 
one of the honored pioneer families of the county and as a citizen 
has ever upheld the prestige of the name which he bears. DeWitt 
C. Jay was born near the Ohio State line, in Wayne township, this 
county, Sept. 22, 1852, a son of Henry and Priscilla (Reed) Jay, 
the latter born in Wayne township and the former is given ex- 
tended mention on another page of this volume, in the sketch of 
Francis D. Jay, a half-brother of DeWitt C. DeWitt C. Jay was 
reared under the influences of the middle pioneer days in Web- 
ster township, where his preliminary educational discipline was se- 
cured in what was known as the Dover Friends' School in the vil- 
lage of Webster. During his boyhood and youth he contributed 
his quota to the work of the home farm and after reaching the 
age of maturity took an interest in the farm and its products and 
continued to be associated in the management of the old homestead 
until 1884, when he purchased eighty acres of it, which constitutes 
his present fine farm. He has made the best improvements ou the 
place and has ever been known as a progressive and reliable busi- 
ness man. His farm is one of the model places of the township 
and here he is held in much esteem. He takes a lively interest in 
public affairs of a local nature, and while he has never desired 
public office of any order is a staunch advocate and supporter of 
the cause of the Republican part), lie served five years as trus- 
tee of Webster township, from 1890 to 1895, and as the incumbent 
of that office concentrated all of the schools in the township at 
Webster, this being the first movement of that kind successfully 



BIOGRAPHICAL 723. 

carried out in the State. He and his wife are valued and active 
birthright members of the Friends' church, lie is affiliated with 
the Webster Dectective Association, the Dover Cemetery Associa- 
tion, and with the ancient order of Free and Accepted Masons, 
Lodge No. 493, in the local organization of which lie has served 
as trustee. On Oct. 16, 1884, Mr. J a .V was united in marriage to 
Miss Adda Bond, born near the village of Webster, /Vug. 17, 1854, 
daughter of Cornelius and Anna Elizabeth ( Figenbradt ) Bond 
(see sketch of Charles T. H. Bond). 

Joseph W. Jordan, a popular citizen of Webster township, has 
been a resident of Wayne county nearly ;i score of years and is 
one of the representative citizens and progressive farmers of the 
township mentioned. The improved homestead which he occupies 
is located on rural mail route No. 6 from Richmond and comprises 
about seventy-eight acres of land. Joseph W. Jordan was bom 
in Darke county, Ohio, May 4, 1875, a son () f Jerome and Margaret 
(Baker) Jordan. Jerome Jordan was reared to the sturdy discipline 
of the farm, and that at a time when farming was not conducted 
under the favorable conditions that obtain in this Twentieth cen- 
tury. His life has been one of consecutive industry and such 
measure of success as came to him has been the result of his 
ability and efforts. His integrity is inviolable ami thus he merits 
and receives the implicit confidence and esteem of his fellow men. 
He continued to reside in Ohio until after his marriage, when he 
located in Randolph county, Indiana, but after a residence there 
of six or eight years went back to Ohio. About 1894 ne again came 
to Indiana, locating in Franklin township, Wayne county, where 
he and his good wife are living practically retired on a small farm. 
He served in an Ohio regiment as a soldier in the Civil war and 
was twice wounded in battle. He and his wife are the parents of 
eight children: Lilly is the wile of Fremont McClure, of Day- 
ton, Ohio; Asa resides in Darke county, Ohio, where he owns a 
farm; Dellah and Mattie are deceased; Joseph W. is the next in 
order of birth ; Myrtle and Mettie were twins, the former of whom 
is the wife of James M. Boswell, a grocer, of Richmond, and the 
latter is deceased; and Harry is a farmer in Franklin township. 
Joseph \Y. Jordan has reason to know and appreciate the dignity 
of honest toil and endeaver, for with the same he has been familiar 
from his boyhood days. Even as he has been the architect of his 
own fortunes as one of the world's workers, so has his educational 
training been largely one of self-discipline and experience, lor in 
his youth his schooling was limited to the common schools of his 
native State and one term at the school in Whitewater. Through 
reading and through association with men and affairs he has. how- 
ever, made good the handicap of his youth. At an early age he left 
school and thereafter found ample demand upon his lime and at- 
tention in connection with the work of the home farm-, and from 
the age of nineteen until twenty-two worked as a farm hand for 
others, lie then rented a farm one year, after which he worked 
lor his brother a year, and then operated a rented farm for two' 
years, lie then came to the place where he now resides and where 



■J2\ MEMOIRS OF WAYNK COUNTY 

he has since been engaged in general farming, giving his atten- 
tion to its improvement and cultivation until it n'ow ranks as one 
of the best places of Webster township. His advancement upon 
the up-grade of independence and definite prosperity has been 
gained by earnest and well directed effort, and he has so ordered 
his course as to command at all times the high regard of those 
with whom he has come in contact in the various relations of life. 
In politics Mr. Jordan is a staunch advocate of the principles and 
policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor, and he is 
a man of broad and liberal views and is tolerant in his judgment. 
On April 3, 1902, Mr. Jordan was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
M. Pemberton, born in Wayne township, June 14, 1883, daughter 
of David and Mollie (Fisher) Pemberton. 

Jonathan Seward Beard, whose residence is located at the west 
end of Alain street in the village of Economy, is one of the pro- 
gressive and highly esteemed citizens of the county and has resided 
hi Perry township during all of his life. lie was born on his grand- 
mother's farm, one-half mile northwest of Economy, at a cross- 
roads then known as "Nantucket," Nov. 5, 1864, a son of Henry 
and Lucinda (Macy) Beard, the former born near Hagerstown, 
Md., and the latter at "Nantucket." Henry Heard came to Indiana 
when a mere child with his father, John Beard, who located two 
and uiie-fourth miles east of Economy, where he purchased a farm, 
upon which he spent the greater part of the residue of his life and 
later moved to Williamsburg, where he died. Henry Beard grew 
to the age of maturity on that homestead and. being a natural stu- 
dent, attended a high school in Economy, taught by Thomas Charles. 
He continued to work on the farm in summer and taught school in 
winter for some time, but being of a mechanical turn of mind he 
served an apprenticeship with George W. Scantland at the carpen- 
ter's trade, and in 1859 he and his fellow-workman, Elam Osborn, 
formed a partnership as carpenters and builders, their first contract 
being the erection of the barn now owned by Oran P. Farmer, in 
Randolph county. They enlarged their business from time to time, 
adding that of undertaking, making coffins, and pump making. 
Later they built a saw mill and a large machine-room for the manu- 
facture of sash, doors, furniture and all kinds of finished woodwork. 
They bought thousands of feet of timber, especially walnut and 
lvnn, which they sawed and shipped, continuing their contracting 
business, and in the early '70s put up a large building for the finish- 
ing and storing of furniture, with a salesroom and a grocery for 
the convenience of their large force of employes. Henry Beard 
continued thus engaged until his death, secure in the esteem of all 
who knew him and numbered among the sterling citizens of the 
county. He died in September, 1877, and his widow is a resident of 
Economy. They became the parents of six children: Lenora C is 
tlie wife of Thomas P. Iladley, a farmer in Perry township; the 
second child died in infancy; Jonathan S. is the third in order of 
birth; John G. Whittier is a farmer and resides in Perry township; 
Charles Sumner is also a farmer and resides in Perry township ; and 
Fred resides in Southern Alberta, Canada. Jonathan S. Beard 



lilOGUAl'llKAI. 725 

passed his boyhood and youth at the parental home and, after com- 
pleting the curriculum of the school in Economy, remained with his 
widowed mother, tending the garden, truck patches, and having gen- 
eral care of his mother's home, and also worked for the neighbors 
at intervals. When about twenty years old he worked for a season 
at the carpenter's trade, but this work proving too heavy for his 
physique he secured employment in a fence machine factory, owned 
by George Williams, where he worked two years. Believing that 
every man should follow some one special line, he worked for a 
season in a tin-shop in Farmland, Ind., and then came to Economy 
and engaged in the sheet-metal work for himself. He did metal 
roofing, spouting, and builder's tin-work generally, but paid espe- 
cial attention to the making of tinware ami repair work, repairing 
almost everything, from jewelry and spectacles, clocks, and gasoline 
stoves, to the smoke-stack of a threshing engine or a water tank 
— it being a frequent saying", if what was wanted could not be found 
in the market, that "Seward Beard will make it." His business 
grew, developing into quite a general store, consisting of hardware, 
chinaware, stoves, furniture, farm implements, and a variety of 
notions. He has applied himself very closely to business for more 
than twenty years and now feels that he can best serve his com- 
munity by engaging in a less strenuous avocation. He served as 
secretary and treasurer of the Economy Creamery four years, as 
local treasurer of the Modoc Telephone Company for some time, 
and is now president of the Northern Wayne Bank at Economy. 
He has also been a notary public for man)- years, doing considerable 
business in that line. Air. Beard is a Prohibitionist in his political 
views, is a strong believer in the dignity of honest labor, deeming 
a wood-culler, minister, or president, simply servants of all those 
who need them. He and his wife are members of the Friends' 
church, he having been superintendent of the Sunday school nine 
years and a teacher therein for twenty years. On March 2, 1899. 
Mr. Beard was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Cooper, born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and whose parents died in a cholera scourge which 
ravaged that city. She was the youngest of six children, who were 
taken to the Friends' Children's Home in Cincinnati. Later, twen- 
ty-two orphaned children were brought from this home to Wayne 
county and placed in private homes, Mrs. Beard being taken into 
the family of Henry Charles, where she was reared. Mr. Charles 
afterward removed from Green township, where he had resided, to 
Spiceland, Ind., and there Mrs. I '.card grew to womanhood and fin- 
ished her education in the academy at that place. 

Jonathan B. Clark, one of the successful physicians and sur- 
geons of Wayne county, where he has also served as pension ex- 
aminer the past sixteen years, is a representative of one of the hon- 
ored families of the count)-, and as a citizen and professional man 
has added to the prestige of the name which he bears. He was born 
in Randolph county, North Carolina, June 26, 1836, a son of Wil- 
liam and Louisa (Worth") Clark, born in Randolph county, North, 
Carolina, the father about 1808 and the mother a few years later. 
William Clark was reared to the life of the farm and received his 



726 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

education in the schools of his native State. Later he became a 
merchant and also engaged in the manufacture of cotton goods, also 
operating a tanner) and manufacturing saddles, harness, etc., and 
he remained in North Carolina until icSGo, when he removed his 
family to Indiana, lie came direct to Economy, purchasing a tract 
of land in Perry township, and there initiated the work of reclaim- 
ing and otherwise improving the property. He also engaged in 
the mercantile business about ten years and then devoted his atten- 
tion exclusively to agricultural pursuits. He developed a produc- 
tive farm and was one of the influential and popular citizens of 
Wayne county. A few years before his demise he suffered a stroke 
of apoplexy, which eventually caused his death, about 1873, secure 
in the esteem and good will of all who knew him and leaving a rec- 
ord untarnished in every respect. [lis widow died some years later, 
about 1.883. They were the parents of twelve children: Thomas 
Elwood became a land owner in Wayne county and spent his last 
year- in Philadelphia, where he died; Jonathan 15. is the second in 
order of birth; Joseph A. became a resident of Idaho and is de- 
ceased; Nancy J. is the widow of John Charles and resides in In- 
dianapolis; I'.razilla \Y. is a retired merchant and fanner and re- 
sides 111 Economy; Rhoda R. became the wife of Henry Cain and 
is deceased; George Edmund is deceased; John M. became a prac- 
ticing physician and is deceased; Asceneth resides in Winchester, 
as do also Mary M. and William J)., the latter of whom i> a farmer 
and banker; and Eunice became the wife of William Mendenhall 
and is deceased. Dr. Clark secured the major portion of his earlier 
educational training at the New Garden Boarding School in Guil- 
ford count)', North Carolina. When about twenty-one years old lie 
began the study of medicine in his native State, teaching school 
and carrying on his studies at the same time, lie attended his first 
course of lectures at Jefferson College in Philadelphia, then took 
a summer course at the University of the City of New York, after 
which he returned to Philadelphia and graduated at the University 
of Pennsylvania School of Medicine with the class of i860. After 
leaving this institution he came to Economy and began the prac- 
tice ol his profession, to which he has since given his attention, anil 
has practically devoted his entire life to his practice, having attend- 
ed 4.000 cases of confinement. For twenty-five years he was the 
only physician at Economy. He has also become the owner of a 
line farm in Perry township, upon which he has made many im- 
provements. In iS()6 he erected a line modern residence and office 
building, and his farm, which is located only- a short distance from 
the village of Economy, is one of the model places of this section 
of the county, as thrift and prosperity are in evidence on every side 
Dr. Clark's political allegiance is given to the Republican party, to 
whose faith he has been loyal since the birth of that organization, 
and he is a potent factor in local affairs ni a public order, lie was 
formerly a member of the Masonic order, but is not so affiliated at 
the present time, and he is a member of the Friends' church at 
Economy, Mrs. Clark being a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Their beautiful home is a center of generous and refined 



iUOGR.U'UKWI J2/ 

hospitality and their circle of friends is circumscribed only by that 
of their acquaintances. Jn 1865 Dr. Clark was united in marriage 
to Miss Matilda J. Conley, born at the village of Boston, in Wayne 
county, in 1847, daughter of Isaac and Luzena (Williams) Conley, 
and of this union were born four children: Eva is the wife of Mor- 
tem Edwards, of Indianapolis, and they have one child, Esther; Ed- 
mund 1). is a physician at Indianapolis, being president of tlie city 
board of health, and his practice as a specialist extends into many 
States — he is married and has one child, Helen; Maude is the wife 
of Charles Williams, of Muncie, and they have a son, Thomas J.; 
and Myrtle is the wife of Dr. John II. Eberwein, a practicing physi- 
cian and surgeon in Indianapolis. The parents of Mrs. Clark were 
born in Pennsylvania. The father came to Wayne count)- very earl) 
and became a land-owner in Boston township, where he cultivated 
a farm a number of years and then removed to Kansas, locating 
near Wichita, where he engaged in farming until his death, his wife 
also dying in Kansas. 

A. Grant Mendenhall is an able and popular representative of 
the agricultural element in Wayne county and is living in practical 
retirement in the village of Economy, where he has resided since 
[906. While engaged in active pursuits he was specially well forti- 
fied 111 all departments of his occupation, was a close student, and 
kept constantly in touch with the advances made in the science of 
agriculture. Mr. Mendenhall was born near Green's Fork, in Clay 
township, this county, Aug. 3, 1839, a son of Solomon and Cecilia 
(Brooks) Mendenhall. Mis father was born in Guilford count)', 
N'oith Carolina, Jan. 12, 1814, and came to Indiana with his parents 
in 1825. The mother was likewise born in North Carolina, the place 
of her birth being in Stokes county and the date Jul) 18. 1810. The 
paternal grandfather was Isaiah Mendenhall, who removed with his 
family to Wayne county, in 1825, and settled in Clay township, 
where he continued to reside the residue of his life. The mother 
of A. Grant Mendenhall came to Wayne county with a brother, 
about 1828, and her parents came in 1836, making the journey in a 
wagon. Her parents were Jesse and Judith (Johnson) Brooks, of 
Stokes county, North Carolina, and they reared a family of nine 
children— Polly, David, John, Matthew, Cecilia, Elizabeth", Warren, 
Alpha, and Charity. The marriage of Solomon and Cecilia (Brooks) 
Mendenhall was solemnized at Green's Fork and they took up their 
abode in the township of Clay, where the husband established him- 
self as a successful farmer and land-owner, contributing largely to 
the upbuilding of the community through his operations. He there 
continued to maintain his home until about 1852, when he purchased 
a farm in Perry township, where he continued to be identified with 
agricultural pursuits until his death, June 14, 1883. He was a man 
of unswerving probity and honor and ever commended the confi- 
dence and esteem of those with whom he came in contact in the va- 
rious relations of life. His widow died Dec. 10, 1803. They were 
the parents of two children: A. Grant is the elder and John Milton 
is a resident of Jefferson township. A. Grant Mendenhall was 
reared to maturity in Perry township, in whose district schools he 



JJS MEMOIRS 01' WAYNE CUUNTV 

secured his preliminary educational discipline, after which he con- 
tinued his studies in the Friends' Boarding- School (now Earlham 
College) ahont live months. After reaching the age of twenty-one 
years he worked for his father one year and then rented land and 
worked for others until twenty-six years old. lie then rented land 
of his father a number of years and finally became the owner of a 
farm in Perry township, upon which tract he continued to reside 
until the fall of 1906, when he moved to Economy and purchased 
the comfortable home where he resides, lie owns 360 acres of land 
in Perry township and rents the different tracts to others. His po- 
litical proclivities arc indicated in the fact that he gives his support 
to the cause of the Republican party, but he has never been active 
in the field of practical politics. He and his wife hold membership 
in the Liberal United Brethren church. On March 26, 1866, Mr. 
Mendenhall was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe A. Oler, born 
in Perry township, May 10, 1845, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth 
(Ballenger) Oler, and the children of this union are: Newman S.. 
born July 31, 1873, a farmer in Perry township, married Luella 
Marshall and they have three children — Hazel, Mary, and Mildred; 
Clara, born July 29, 1875, is the wife of Edgar I. Manning, a farmer 
of Perr)' township, and they have two daughters — Elizabeth and 
Christine; and Charles A., born Sept. 27, 1878, married India Eenni- 
more, is a railway mail clerk and resides in the village of Economy. 
Mrs. Meiidenhall is amember of the Ladies' Aid Society. 

Elam Osborn, former trustee of Perry township and recog- 
nized as one of the representative business men and most public 
spirited citizens of the attractive little village of Economy, is liv- 
ing* practically retired in that village. Energy and progressive 
methods have brought to him a large measure of success in his 
chosen fields of endeavor and he holds the unqualified esteem of the 
people of his home village and county. Mr. Osborn was horn in 
Economy, Dec. 16, 1838, a son of John and Rachel (Johnson) Os- 
born, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Indiana. 
John Osborn was born at Lost Creek, Tenn., Nov. 28, 1801, and at 
the age of about fourteen removed with his parents to Mount Pleas- 
ant, Ohio. The paternal grandfather, Charles Osborn, was a noted 
Friends preacher and in 1819 removed his family to Economy. 
where he platted the first and second additions of the village, in 
1825 and 1828, respectively. He traveled a great deal, crossing the 
ocean three times to preach in England. His first wife, the grand- 
mother of Elam Osborn, died in Tennessee, and before leaving that 
State the grandfather married Hannah Swain, in 1810. Later in 
life he removed to Michigan and resided at Niles, that State, until 
his death. John Osborn, the father of Elam, came to Economy with 
his father, in 1819, but when he attained his majority went to Bel- 
mont county, Ohio, where he taught school and pursued the study 
of medicine. When he had completed his studies he became dis- 
satisfied with the medical profession and decided to engage in the 
nursery business. He collected seeds in Ohio, had them taken down 
the river on a Hat-boat and then freighted over the country from 
Cincinnati to Economy, where he established a nursery and Von- 



tinned in the business, selling all kinds of seeds, sprouts, etc., until 
about 1855. After that time he lived practically retired, attending 
to his fruit and frequently selling pears, apples, etc., for ten cents 
per bushel, and died in Economy, May 2, 1874. Beginning on Aug. 
1, 1833, he kept a daily record of the temperature of the weather, 
taking an observation at sunrise, another in the warmest part of 
the day, and still another at sunset. He continued this practice 
throughout his life and requested his sons to continue the observa- 
tions at least ten years after his death. After his demise his son 
Josiah continued the practice until his death, in 1892, and since 
that time Elam Osborn has kept the record faithfully, making his 
observations three times daily, and expects to continue to do so the, 
residue of his life. The mother of Elam Osborn was born in Rich- 
mond, Ind., March 22, 1816, and died Feb. 15, 1895, having become 
the mother of sixteen children, but six of whom reached the age of 
maturity, and but two of these are now living — Elam and his sister. 
Martha, wife of Allison Thorp, of Delaware count}-, Indiana. John 
Osborn, the father, was a man of line intellectuality and generous 
attributes of character. His integrity was inviolable and he ever 
merited and received the unqualified esteem of his fellow men. 
Elam Osborn was reared in a home of culture and refinement and 
this influence proved potent in results during the formative period 
of his character. lie gained his rudimentary education in the 
schools of his native village and later attended a private school 
taught by a Mr. Moore, who taught a six-weeks term in Economy. 
While he had a natural dislike for the schoolroom he completed the 
course under Mr. Moore and became very proficient in mathematics. 
When about nine years old he worked for others for his board and 
clothes, later receiving small wages for his labor, and in 1856 turned 
his attention to the carpenter trade. He worked at this trade for 
others until 1858, when he worked as a partner with Nicholas Ben- 
nett, and in 1859 formed a partnership with Henry Heard (see 
sketch of Jonathan S. Heard). This partnership existed until the 
time of Mr. Beard's death, first as contractors and builders, then 
in the saw-mill business, and later in the manufacture of furniture 
and the handling of all kinds of building materials. After Mr. 
Beard's death the partnership property was appraised at $11,000, 
while the indebtedness of the firm amounted to SH.ooo. Mr. Osborn 
assumed the indebtedness of the firm and took over the business, 
which he continued until it was closed out, in 189T. lie then pur- 
chased a small farm near Economy and constructed an artificial 
lake, known as the Osborn Eake, and conducted this place as a 
summer resort a number of years, finally selling it to his son-in- 
law. He now lives in the village of Economy, in retirement, lie 
owns a twenty-acre tract of land, located one and one-hall miles 
south of the village, a fine tract of wood land two miles south, and 
several lots in the village, in addition to his residence property, 
which includes about eighteen acres adjoining the town. For about 
forty years, in addition to his other affairs, he was engaged in the 
undertaking business. As a citizen Mr. Osborn has long been 
prominent by reason of his progressive ideas and his interest in all 



730 MKMoIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

that tends to conserve the advancement and material and civic 
prosperity of his home community. His political allegiance is given 
to the Republican part}-, in whose cause he has rendered effective 
service, although he reserves the right to act independently when- 
ever in his opinion the exigency of the occasion requires such 
action. He served four years, from 1882 to 1886. as trustee of Perry 
township, in which office he gave a most commendable and popular 
administration of township affairs. He at one time stood as an 
independent candidate for the office of county treasurer and his 
popularity was evinced by the fact that he came within 200 votes 
of being elected to that position. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Friends 1 church. On Jan. 4, 1862, Mr. Osborn was united in 
marriage to Miss Agnes Patterson, born in Valparaiso, Ind., Jan. 
2(>. 1845, daughter of Samuel R. and Jane (Turner) Patterson, and 
of this union were born eleven children: Helen C. born April 17. 
1863, is the wife of Alonzo E. Massey, of Richmond, and they have 
three children — William I.. Fannie E., and Marshall O. ; Charles 
A., bom (Jet. 12, 1864. flied Oct. 21, 1893; William, born Sept. 21, 
1866, died Dec. 7, 1874; Jennie, born Nov. 22, 1868, is the wife of 
Jacob O. Rallenger, a merchant, of Economy, and they have six 
children — O. Howard. Albert. Mary H., William E., Irene and Ada; 
John S.. born Dec. 17. 1870, engaged in the wholesale produce busi- 
ness in Richmond, married Cinthia Swayne and they have two chil- 
dren — Agnes B., and Opal ; Roland, born Jan. 20. 1873. an under- 
taker at Shreveport, La., married Kitty Atkinson and they have 
four children — Charles A., Percy E., Henry R.. and Martha; Ethel, 
bom June 28, 1875. is the wife of Oliver Vernon Marshall, a farmer, 
of Perry township, and they have four children — Thomas E.. Mal- 
colm O., W. Macv. and Jesse Ray; Frank E.. bom Feb. 28. 1879. is 
a graduate of Purdue University, a civil engineer by occupation, at 
Denver, Colo., married Mamie Mendenhall and they have three 
children— Marjorie E.. Rachel A., and Joseph C. ; Daisy, born Oct. 
8. 1883. resides at the parental home; Robert Josiah, born Sept. 25, 
1885. a civil engineer at Indianapolis, married Mary Waldron and 
has one child, Robert Flam ; and Jesse T., born Aug. 26, 1887, a civil 
engineer, engaged with the New York Central lines at Cleveland, 
Ohio, married Mai)- Ormsby. Samuel R. Patterson, father of Mrs. 
Osborn, was born in Vermont and came to Muncie, Ind.. when a 
young man. He was a tinner by trade and died at the age of forty- 
>ix years, leaving a family of nine children. His widow resides at 
Portland, Ind., with a daughter. 

James Chipman Carman, deceased, was one of the conspicuous 
real-estate men of Richmond and some years was connected with 
the banking circles of the city as an employe of the Second Na- 
tional Rank. Mr. Carman was born in Muncie, Ind., Aug. 9, 1850, 
son of William Carman. The father was a farmer by occupation, 
and the mother died when the son was a mere child, thus depriv- 
ing him of a loving mother's devoted care and training. At the 
age of nine years he was taken into an old Quaker family, with 
whom he resided a few years, and then lived a short time with an 
older brother in Ohio. He attended school at Muncie. Ind., and 



ISlOOUAl'IllCAl 7.^1 

later was a student in the academy at Lynn. When lie was seven- 
teen years old he engaged in the liver)' business at Winchester, 
lnd., and continued in that business until he came to Richmond. In 
the latter place lie became connected with the Snyder carriage 
factory, with which he remained a few years and then engaged in 
the real-estate business. Later, he handled outside business for 
the Second National Rank, at Richmond, a number of years, ami 
in this connection proved himself a faithful employe, remaining 
with the bank until his health failed, in [902. He was then com- 
pelled to give up his position with the bank, and in the latter part 
of 1903 went south and resided at Port Worth, Tex., until his 
death, March 30, 1904, deeply mourned by a large circle of friends. 
Aside from his business career he gave some attention to fraternal 
matters, as is evidenced by the fact that he was a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Richmond. On Feb. 28, 
1900, Mr. Carman was married to Cora M. Howard, daughter of 
William H. and Rebecca Howard, of Richmond, both deceased, and 
to them were born two children : Mary C, born Dec. 25, 1900, and 
James Smith, born Feb. 28, 1904. 

Charles T. H. Bond is one of the popular citizens and well 
known business men of the city of Richmond ami is a member of 
one of the sterling pioneer families of Wayne county, of which 
he is a native son. He is engaged in the machine-shop business, 
to which line of enterprise he has devoted his attention many years, 
and is valued as a loyal and public-spirited citizen. He was born 
in Webster township, this count)', Aug. 24, 1862, a son of Cornelius 
and Anna Elizabeth (Eigenbradt) Bond, the former born in Web- 
ster township, this count)', Dec. 2, 1834, and the latter in the State 
of Virginia, Nov. 6, 1832. The paternal grandparents were Thomas 
and Ann (Hawkins) Loud, natives of North Carolina, the former 
born April 3, 181 1, and the latter on Nov. 12, 1810. Thomas Bond 
was a very early settler in Wayne count)', locating in Webster 
township, and there he and his wife died, he passing awav on 
April b, 1 86 1 , and she on Aug. 17, 1884. Cornelius Bond was reared 
and educated in Webster township ami continued on the old home- 
stead until married. Oct. 13, 1853, when he removed to an ad- 
joining farm. Later, he removed to another farm, located one 
mile north, and there resided until 1896, when he removed to 
Richmond, where he died March 3, 1897, an d bis widow survived 
until April, 1907. He spent practically his entire active life as a 
farmer and in connection therewith was for a time engaged in the 
implement business, selling to neighboring farmers. At the time of 
his death he was the secretary and treasurer of the Wayne County, 
now the German Baptist Insurance Company. His life was char- 
acterized by the most inflexible integrity and honor and to him was 
accorded the esteem of all who knew him. Of the union of him and 
his devoted wife were born seven children: Adda is the wife of 
DeWitt C. Jay (see sketch) ; Anna Josephine died March 18, 1895; 
Ella L. is the wife of Everett Pickett, of Richmond; William A. 
is a farmer and resides in Webster township; Charles T. 11., is 
the next in order of birth; Caddie R. died in 190*); and Jeannette 



73- memoirs ok \y.\y.\k county 

is the wife of Orlando H. Little, proprietor of the West Side Livery 
Stable, in Richmond. Charles T. II. Bond gained his rudimentary 
education in the district schools of his native township and after- 
ward spent one term at Purdue University, lie resided at home 
until twenty-one years old, having" learned the carpenter's trade in 
the meantime, and worked at this occupation, in Richmond, Chi- 
cago, and various other places, as a journeyman, until 1886, when 
he went to Kansas and pre-empted a claim which he still owns. 
He remained in Kansas about seven months and then returned to 
Wayne count)-. In 1887 he engaged in the threshing business and 
also operated other machinery until 1904, doing his own repairing, 
etc. He then began manufacturing his own machines, making his 
separator complete, and also manufactured a shredder, saw mill, 
etc., which he calls the "Indiana Special." He also does a gen- 
eral repair business on engines, etc., being an expert engineer, and 
during two years tested the Robinson engines when not engaged 
at threshing. In 1899 he located at his present place of business, 
where he has since continued, controlling a large and representa- 
tive patronage. lie is known as a specially skillful artisan and as 
a reliable and progressive business man. lie has ever shown a deep 
interest in public affairs and is well fortified in his opinions as to 
matters of political import. His allegiance is given unreservedly 
to the Republican party and he has been active in the promotion 
of its cause in a local way. He is affiliated with Coeur De Lion 
Lodge, No. 8, Knights of Pythias, at Richmond. He still retains 
his interest in the estate of his father, which comprises valuable 
real estate in Wayne county. 

George Frederick Jones, deceased, man)' years one of Rich- 
mond's prominent and useful citizens, was born June i, 1844, a son 
of Amos Jones. His birthplace was in Xunda, X. Y., and lie was 
the third of a family of four children, lie was partially reared in 
his native State and partially in Indiana, to which State the family 
removed in 1858, and he attended the public schools of Fort Wayne. 
When this country was torn asunder by the strife of Civil war 
Mr. Jones responded to his country's call for volunteers, in 1802, 
and became a member of Company B, Twelfth Indiana infantry, 
under Col. William II. Link, who was succeeded by Col. Reuben 
II. Williams. Mr. Jones joined the regiment at its reorganization 
at Indianapolis for the three years' service, being mustered in Aug. 
17, 1862. It left the State a i'ew days later to meet the threatened 
invasion of Kirby Smith, and participated in the battle of Rich- 
mond, Ky. Colonel Link was mortally wounded and most of the 
men were taken prisoners, but were paroled and were exchanged 
in November. After the exchange the regiment moved for Holly 
Springs, Miss., and marched to the Tallahatchie river in Decem- 
ber. It was stationed at Grand Junction in January, 1863, and in 
the spring was placed on duty at Collierville, Tenn. It was as- 
signed to Logan's corps, Army of the Tennessee, and moved to 
Vicksburg in June, remaining in the trenches until the surrender. 
It then moved to the P>ig Black River, where it remained until Sept. 
28, then went to Memphis and participated in the march to Chat- 



BIOGRAPHICAL J^ 

tanooga. It was in the battle of Missionary Ridge, then joined in 
pursuit of Bragg to Graysville, Ga., where it was ordered to the 
relief of General Burnside at Knoxville. It remained in camp at 
Scottsboro, Ala., from Dec. 26, 1863, to May 1, 1864. In the At- 
lanta campaign it was engaged at Resaca, New Hope Church, Dal- 
las, Kenesaw Mountain, and Jonesboro. It joined in pursuit of 
Hood through Georgia and Alabama and, on Nov. 14, moved for 
Savannah. After the surrender of that city the regiment joined 
in the campaign of the Carolinas, being engaged at Columbia and 
Bentonville. It then marched to Raleigh, Richmond, and Wash- 
ington, and was mustered out at the last named place, June 8, 1865. 
Mr. Jones was never wounded and spent no time in either a hospital 
or a prison. After the close of the war he returned to Fort Wayne, 
Ind., and resumed work at the printer's trade, which he had 
learned when a mere boy. lie became a foreman in the office of 
the Fort Wayne "Gazette" and remained in that position several 
years. In 1885 nc came to Richmond and took a position as fore- 
man in the office of the "Palladium," and continued so engaged 
several years, but was finally compelled to practically retire because 
of failing health, although he occasionally did some work for other 
papers, but did not attempt to work steadily. Mis death at his 
home in Richmond was a severe loss to the whole community. 
Mr. Jones was a very quiet and unassuming man, strictly honest, 
who devoted his life to his business and the happiness of his fam- 
ily. During his life he was a member of the Typographical Union. 
A brother and a sister survive: Edward S. is a retired engineer 
and resides in Fort Wayne, Ind., and Helen is the wife 'of F. S. 
Soul, a retired merchant of Crestline. Ohio. His widow resides in 
the old home at Richmond. Mr. and Mrs. Jones reared a family 
of seven children: Frederick W., born Oct. 13, 1880, is a tailor 
by occupation and resides at Flwood, Ind.; Malvern A., born Oct. 
13. 1881, is a traveling salesman and resides at Columbus, Ohio; 
Paulina, born May 18, 1883, is the wife of Carl Essenmacher and 
resides in Richmond; John A. Logan, born May 31, 1884, married 
Lenora Hollingsworth, of Lincoln, Neb., and resides at Indianapolis ; 
Julia, born April iS, 1886, died in February, 1887; Helen Elizabeth, 
born July 3, 1888, resides at home with her mother; Charles L., 
born June 22, 1890, is employed with the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company at Richmond; and Clara, born Sept. 6, 1892, graduated 
in the high school at Richmond in 191 1, and lives at home. The 
parents of Mr. Jones were Amos and Martha (Smith) Jones, the 
former born in Clifton Springs. N. Y.. in June, 1815, and died in 
Nunda, i\ T . V., in 1854, and the latter was born in Whittingham, 
Vt., in April, 1817. The}- were married Oct. 13, 1838, at Nunda, 
X. A. The father was a millwright by occupation and owned and 
conducted a mill in that place until his death. The mother came 
with her four children to Indiana, about 1858, and settled in Whitley 
county, later removing to Fort Wayne, where she spent the residue 
of her life. She died, however, in Centerville, in 1807. while visit- 
ing her daughter. Charles, her second son, was killed on a railroad 
in 1862. George F. Jones was married Oct. 28. 1870. to Paulina 



734 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Wright, born in Penhville, Jay county, Indiana, Dec. 27, 185 1, 
daughter of Elijah and Elizabeth (Coffin) Wright, born in Wayne 
county, the father near Richmond and the mother near Economy. 
The father was a fanner by occupation and removed with his par- 
ents to Jay county when a young man and there became a land 
owner and spent the residue of his life, dying in January, 1878. He 
was a great temperance advocate and was a conductor on the 
"Underground Railway," before and during the days of the Civil 
war. The mother died in Jay county in November, 1902. They 
were the parents of three children, ^\ whom Mrs. Jones is the eld- 
est. Malvern (.)., who resides on the old homestead in Jay county, 
married Addie Stansbury and they have one child, Mary ; and 
Frank E., who resides near Manton, Mich., married Daisy Mc- 
Daniel, and they have seven children — Jesse. Orlo, Nina, llattie. 
Esther, Lydia, and Ralph. 

Franklin K. Lombard, deceased, several years prominent as a 
railroad man and later as a retired citizen of Richmond, was born 
in Enfield, Mass., Sept. 25, 1812, son of Lewi Lombard. The father 
was a sea captain by occupation and spent all of his active career 
as a seaman. Franklin K. Lombard lived with his parents until 
1833, at which time he went to Xorwalk. Ohio, where he taught 
school and worked at various other occupations. Later, he re- 
moved to Lansing. Mich., where he conducted a hotel some time, 
but upon losing his establishment by fire engaged in railroading a 
number of years as a conductor, llis next removal was to Kansas, 
where he purchased land near Atchison and engaged in farming, 
and while residing there, in the fall of 1859, was elected a member 
of the last Territorial legislature, serving in the session of 1860. 
Later, he sold his holdings in Kansas and again engaged in rail 
loading as a conductor on the Pennsylvania lines, and this em- 
ployment caused him to establish his residence in Richmond, where 
lie spent the, closing years of his life in retirement and died May 
26, [899. In politics he first espoused the cause of the Democratic 
party and as a Democrat was elected to the Kansas legislature. 
but afterward became a Republican, but never sought to become 
that organization's candidate for any public office, lie was a de- 
vout and. zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
contributed liberally to its welfare. Reside his good wife he left 
a wide circle of friends to mourn his passing. On July 12, 1804, 
was celebrated Mr. Lombard's marriage to .Miss Elizabeth J. 
Holmes, born in Clermont county, Ohio, Jan. 31, 1826, daughter 
of Erastus and Mary Ann (Leming) Holmes. Mr. Holmes was 
born in the State of New York, in 1800, and his wife in Clermont 
county. Ohio, in 1802. The father was a merchant during all of 
his early life and was first engaged in that business in Clermont 
count}, Ohio, but later removed to Cincinnati, where he continued 
in the mercantile business until his death, in 1863, and his wife 
passed away in 1864. There were no children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lombard and the only companion of Mrs. Lombard is Lida E. 
Shumard, a daughter of a deceased sister, who has resided' with 
her since infancy, when the mother died. Of the union of Mr. and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 735 

Mrs. Holmes, parents of Mrs. Lombard, were born seven children, 
of whom two are living, Mrs. Lombard and Lucy Ann, wdio is the 
widow of David Sparks and resides with a daughter in Richmond. 
Since the death of her husband Mrs. Lombard has continued to 
reside in Richmond, to which city she came as a bride in 1864. 
Prior to her marriage she was a nurse at Camp Dennison, Ohio. 
Her first experience in that line was when 3,000 soldiers were 
landed there from the battle of Pittsburg Landing, and she con- 
tinued there as a nurse until near the close of the war, when she. 
was called home by the death of her father, and her mother passed 
away live months later. She has invested considerably in Rich- 
mony city property. Her first investment was a residence prop- 
erty in West Richmond, and this she afterward sold and purchased 
the Avenue Hotel. Later, she exchanged this for other property, 
which she sold and purchased the residence where she resides, at 
in South Ninth street. She also owns a residence property at 
210 South Eleventh street. 

Robert Lincoln Kelly, a leading educator of the State of In- 
diana and president of Earlham College at Richmond, was born 
at Tuscola, 111., .March 22, 1865. His parents were Robert and Anna 
(Pearson) Kelly, both born in Miami county, Ohio, and descended 
from a long line of Quaker ancestry. Robert Kelly was for years 
editor and proprietor of the "Spring River Fountain," at Mount 
Vernon, Mo., and he was a delegate from the State of Missouri to 
the Republican national convention that nominated President Grant 
for his second term. Later, he removed to Parke count)', Indiana, 
which county he represented in the State legislature. Moses Pear- 
son, father of Anna Pearson, was one of the first Indian agents 
sent by the Friends to the Indian Territory, and the daughter spent 
several years of her girlhood with Indian children as playmates in 
what is now Oklahoma. Robert Lincoln Kelly graduated in the 
Friends' Ploomingdale Academy in 1884. and in Earlham College, 
where he received the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy, in 1888. 
lie then taught for ten years in public high schools and academies, 
acting during all the time as principal. Per six years of this time 
he was principal of Central Academy at Plainfield, Ind., during 
which time the Academy's reputation as a high grade educational 
institution became State-wide. He was offered the county super- 
intendency of Hendricks county, but decided to pursue graduate 
study and" entered the University of Chicago, where he studied for 
Ihree years, lie worked in the lines of Philosophy, Education, 
and Political Science, and was awarded a fellowship for three suc- 
cessive years. The University conferred upon him the degree of 
Master of Philosophy in 1899. For the past ten years he has been 
at Earlham College, first as Dean of the College, and since 1903 as 
President. During that time the attendance has increased 115 per 
cent, and the budget has increased [85 per cent. Two large build- 
ings have been erected and the endowment has been largely aug- 
mented. The college is now running at full capacity and has the 
endorsement of educational experts everywhere. Dr. Kelly holds, 
main- honorable positions in the educational and religious world. 



736 M KM Ol US OF WAYXK COUNTY 

For t lie past seven years he lias been a member of the Indiana Stale 
Board of Education, lie was an original appointee and is still a 
member of the Indiana Rhodes Scholarship Committee, lie is 
president of the Board of Education of the Five Years' Meeting of 
Friends in America, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Re- 
ligious Educational Association, a member of the National Educa- 
tional Asociation, and also of numerous associations of more or 
less scope, lie is much in demand for sermon.-,, addresses and lec- 
tures, especially along educational lines, for as an educational or- 
ganizer and public speaker upon educational subjects he has few 
equals. The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him 
by De Pauw University in 1907. In 1890, I Jr. Kelly was happily 
married to .Miss Cecilia Rifner, at Bloomington, hid., and they have 
three children: Agnes Rifner, the eldest, is a senior in Earlham 
College; Lois Anna is a sophomore in the Richmond High School; 
and Robert Harper is a pupil in the priman' grades of the Rich- 
mond public schools. 

Ralmaro Paige, only son of Ralph A. and Mary (McCullough) 
Paige, was born at Richmond, Ind., July 30, 1856, and died at In- 
dianapolis, Ind., Oct. 10, 1900. With the exception of short pe- 
riods spent in law offices in Indianapolis and Minneapolis his life- 
was spent in the city of his birth. In politics he was a strong Re- 
publican. With him right was right, and to do right by his fellow 
men was a precept that he faithfully followed. A lover of the Bible, 
of all that was beautiful in art, poetry and music, he was truly a 
noble man. He remained in the old family home all his life, with 
his mother and only sister, Lillian E. Paige, and he thoroughly en- 
joyed his home. His devotion to them was unlimited — bright, 
cheerful, ever trying to make them happy. His fust and last 
thoughts were for them. The brightness of life for them went 
out when he crossed over the silent river. The ancestry of the 
Paige family can be traced back to the early part of the Seventeenth 
century, when settlement was made in Massachusetts by the ances- 
tors of the subject of this sketch. The great-grandfather was a 
minute man on the immortal 19th of April, 1775, when American 
history first began to be made. His grandfather saw service in 
the Massachusetts militia, holding a commission as lieutenant, 
signed by Elbridge Gerry in 181 1, and one as lieutenant-colonel 
by Governor Brooks, of Massachusetts, in 1822. His mother's an- 
cestors were Scotch-Irish, a well known family of McCulloughs 
who were pioneers from Pennsylvania to Butler county,' Ohio, com- 
ing first to Fort Hamilton, in 1800, when the fort had to be sought 
part of the time for safety from Indians, and afterward to Oxford, 
Ohio, where Samuel McCullough, his great-grandfather, built the 
first house. The following extract is taken from the memorial pre- 
sented to the mother and sister of Ralmaro Paige by the Wayne 
County liar Association at Richmond: "Mr. Paige was educated 
in the schools of this city, graduating in the high school in the 
class of 1875. I" school he was conspicuous as an apt scholar and 
lor his exceptional ability. After completing his course in the high 
school, he continued a student and remained such all his life, at- 







CtLoJ?*** aA^r ( - / ^ 



IlIOGUAl'IllCAI. 737 

quiring by systematic reading and study wide information and 
culture. His education acquired in the schools was but the begin- 
ning of his acquired knowledge, his large acquirements coming by 
an intelligently directed and studious life. lie studied law in this 
city, acquiring a full and comprehensive knowledge of legal prin- 
ciples, and was admitted to the bar in 1878; and he remained a 
member of the bar of this county to the time of his death. He was 
much interested in the Masonic order, of which he was a member, 
serving his brethren in various positions, always with signal ability, 
and received at their hands the highest honors within their power 
to bestow. He was a man unusually gifted as a public speaker, 
having a naturally clear and convincing manner in presenting a sub- 
ject, combined with the vigor and graces of oratory. He was a 
good citizen, broad minded and liberal, a man of absolute probity 
and integrity, and in every way a lovable character. All that he 
did was conscientiously and well done, and he enjoyed always the 
confidence, respect, and esteem of all who knew him well. The 
members of the bar of this court had for him a universal and genu- 
ine sentiment of respect and esteem." Masonry had a strong at- 
traction for him, and he loved the beautiful teachings of that order. 
He was a member of Richmond Lodge No. 196, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and also of King Solomon Chapter No. 4, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons. The following memorial, adopted by the lodge of which he 
was a member, and dated Nov. 2, 1909, is taken from the "Masonic 
Advocate" of December, 1909: "It is with us a painful duty to 
record that death has removed from our circle of fellowship Past 
.Master Brother Ralmaro Paige, who departed this life Oct. 10, A. 
D. 1909, a member of Richmond Lodge, No. 196, Free and Accepted 
Masons, Richmond, Ind. P.rother Paige was initiated an Entered 
Apprentice Feb. 12, 1889, passed to the degree of Fellowcraft March 
5, 1889, and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, April 
16, 1889. He immediately became an active and earnest craftsman, 
and has been an influential and dominating factor in the growth of 
his lodge, both as officer and member, because of his eminent 
fitness, his wisdom, and conspicuous ability. During the years of 
lcXgo and 1891 he was the Senior Deacon, in 1892 its Junior Warden, 
and during the years 1893, 1894, 1900, 1901 and 1902 was the Wor- 
shipful Master, and the following year and until the date of his 
decease he served as a trustee of the lodge. From the time of his 
entrance into the institution he was a devout believer in its prin- 
ciples, which in his daily life he sought to exemplify by practicing 
the Golden Rule. Pie was modest, considerate, obliging, thought- 
ful of the happiness of others, possessing a retiring disposition, and 
his devotion to his mother and sister and to Masonry were crown- 
ing virtues. As a student of Masonry he was thorough, earnest 
and able; as an adviser and counsellor he showed wisdom and 
strength, and in his knowledge of Masonic law and ritualism, in 
which he had no rival in his lodge, he was an authority and his opin- 
ion was respected. He was honest, faithful, and true to every 
trust bestowed — a good Mason — the kindliest memory of whom 
will live in the hearts of his brethren. Therefore let this memorial 



738 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

be recorded in the minutes of this lodge, a cop) be given to his de- 
voted mother and sister, and the altar and the jewels, where he has 
so often met with the craft, be draped in mourning". Respectfullv 
sul. nutted, F. \Y. Wilson, El wood Morris, S. A. .Vlaedonald, com- 
mittee." 

David J. Hoerner, deceased, many years one of the prominent 
bakers of the city of Richmond, was horn in Waldenburg, Ger- 
many, Feb. 12, 1830. llis parents spent their entire lives in the 
Fatherland, the father dying during the early childhood of David 
J. and thus leaving to his wife the care of their little son and a 
daughter. The latter, grown to womanhood, became Airs. Chris- 
tina Rist, of Dayton, Ohio, and is deceased. At an early age David 
J. Hoerner began preparation for the ministry, pursuing his studies 
in Waldenburg and later at Stuttgart until after his majority, but 
his financial circumstances were limited, and finding it very diffi- 
cult to meet his expenses he followed his uncle's advice to abandon 
his studies and take up some trade. Accordingly, he began learn- 
ing the baker's trade, beginning his apprenticeship in the bather- 
land. In 1854, however, he determined to try his fortune in 
America, and crossing the Atlantic look up his residence in Day- 
ton, Ohio, where he completed his apprenticeship in the bakery 
establishment of the firm of Rosier & Rowman. In 1855 Mr. Hoer- 
ner removed to Richmond, where he began business on his own 
account, establishing the second enterprise of the kind in the city, 
his predecessor being William Mason. lie began operations on 
a small scale at No. 13 South Fifth street, but his trade constantly 
increased in volume and importance until it bad assumed extensive 
proportions. The quality of his goods, his evident desire to please 
his patrons, and his straightforward dealings won for him a very 
marked success, and many years he maintained the leadership in 
his line in this section of the State. At the time of the war, in 
1862 and 1863, he furnished bread and other bakery goods for a 
regiment of soldiers encamped at Richmond. lie was one of the 
first cracker manufacturers in the city. These goods were at first 
made by hand, but after a time, owing to the great demand, he in- 
creased his facilities by putting in the most improved machinery 
used in the manufacture of crackers, and his trade was then ex- 
tended over many of the adjoining States, lie carried on a gen- 
eral bakery business and prosperity attended his well directed 
efforts, lie was solicited to join the United States Raking (Ann- 
pan v when the great combine was formed, but refused and earned 
on an independent business until 1892, when he retired, being suc- 
ceeded in the enterprise by his sons. Mr. Hoerner was a man of 
excellent business and executive ability, of keen discrimination, 
sound judgment and capable management. lie did not limit his 
efforts to one line of business, but encouraged many enterprises 
that promoted the commercial activity oi the city and promoted 
some by his financial assistance and his advice, lie was at one 
time a large stockholder and a director in the Richmond National 
Rank, which for a considerable period was one of the substantial 
institutions of the citv, but which afterward failed, Mr, Hoerner 



UIOGRAl'IUCAL 739 

losing considerable money thereby. He was also one of the organ- 
izers of the German Mutual Fire Insurance Company, was chosen 
its first president, and served in that capacity until his death. Mis 
reputation in all trade transactions was above question and to an 
unusual degree he enjoyed the confidence and regard of those with 
whom he was brought in contact through business dealings. In 
1892, accompanied by his wife, he went abroad, visiting the prin- 
cipal cities of France, England and Germany, also the places of 
historic interest, and the beautiful scenes for which those countries 
are famed. In 1855 Mr. Iloerner was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Markwart, a native of Germany, but at the time of her 
marriage a resident of Dayton, Ohio. They had two sons: Charles 
M., born Oct. 19. 1857, is now living in Richmond, connected with 
the Chesapeake & Ohio railway offices, and David F., born April 
17, i860, married Mamie Vincent, died in the West, Jan. 18, 1884, 
and his widow resides in Richmond. After the death of his first 
wife, Mr. Iloerner was married, May 4, 1862, to Miss Catherine 
Leab, daughter of John and Christina (Ream) Leab, of near Cen- 
terville, and of this union were born eight children: Magdalena 
Christina, born March 11, 1863, is the wife of Ross D. Sherman, 
connected with the Starr Piano Company at Richmond; Anna Bar- 
bara, born Jan. 30, 1865, became the wife of Robert Jenkins, and 
died Aug. 19, 1895: Flora Magdalene, born March 15, 1867, is the 
wife of Cassius C. Beall, of Richmond; John Jacob, born March 6, 
J 870, is connected as manager with the Fleischman Yeast Com- 
pany at Minneapolis, Minn.; Emma Gertrude, born Jul}' 4, 1872, 
became the wife of Charles Bradway and died Dec. 12, 1907; Mary 
Catherine, born Aug. 31, 1875, is the widow of Louis Basselman, 
who died Feb. 10, 1910, and she is living with her mother, having 
had two children — David, born Aug. 21, 1903, died Jul}- 25, 191 1, 
and Sanford, born Jul}- 6, 1905; Christina Caroline, born Aug. 4, 
1879, died Aug. 2, 1880, and George William, born May 2, 1882, 
died June 26, 1896. Mrs. Iloerner was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, Dec. 1, 1839, and is of German descent. She came 
with her parents to Wayne county in 1854, is still a respected resi- 
dent of the city of Richmond. She holds membership in the First 
Presbyterian Church, and is also a member of the Daughters of 
Rebekah of Herman lodge. Mr. Iloerner passed away Nov. 4, 
1895. H e held membership in St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, and in his political connections was always an ardent Re- 
publican. He was a member of Webb Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons; of Harmon}- Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and of the German Benevolent Society. 

Charles S. Bond, M. D., is one of the successful physicians and 
popular citizens of his native count}-, and is one of the most highly 
honored residents of the city of Richmond, where he has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession nearly thirty years, lie is 
an able representative of the medical fraternity in this section of 
the State and is well entitled to consideration in this publication. 
Dr. Pond was born on a farm near Webster, this conn'tv. |une 8, 
1856, a son of Simon II. and Susan (Harris) Pond, natives of 



7-|0 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Wayne county, the former born near Webster, in 1831, and the 
latter near Williamsburg". The father was one of a large family ami 
his parents died when he was eight years old. He received his edu- 
cation in the common schools, was a teacher for several years, 
followed farming during the greater part of his active career, and 
for a time was engaged in general mercantile pursuits at the vil- 
lage of Webster, lie labored indefatigably during the earlier years 
of his life and, although disabled from sickness, by good manage- 
ment and energy, was enabled to make a good living for his fam- 
ily, he and his wife being held in unqualified esteem by all who 
knew them. lie took great interest in public affairs and was an 
upright and exemplary man. In the later years he suffered from 
ill health, and he died in the home of his daughter, in California, 
Jan. 16, 1898, at the age of sixty-seven years. The mothei of 
Dr. Bond was a daughter of Benjamin Harris. She was educated 
in the schools of Wayne county, and remained a resident here until 
her death, in March, 1876. Her father was one of the pioneers of 
the county, entering land near Chester and afterward removing to 
a farm near Williamsburg. He was one of the builders of the Wil- 
liamsburg & Richmond turnpike. He lived to the age of ninety- 
five years and was then killed by an accident, caused by a runaway 
horse. Both of the ancestors of Dr. Bond came from England, 
landing near Philadelphia, and afterward went to South Carolina 
and thence came to Wayne county. Dr. Charles S. Bond was 
reared under the sturdy discipline of the home farm, and was duly 
afforded the advantages of the common schools of Webster, Wil- 
liamsburg, and Richmond, and Wayne county has been his home 
from the time of his birth to the present time. At the age of fifteen 
he entered Earlham College and remained, with alternate teaching 
and going to school, until he had completed his junior year. At 
that time he went to Antioch College, Ohio, in order to do some 
special work in Comparative Anatomy. He remained there two 
years and then entered the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, in 
1878. He then taught school for a time, continuing his medical 
studies under Dr. J. R. Weist, of Richmond, until 1882, when he 
entered Bcllevue Hospital Medical College, and in 1883 graduated 
with the honors of the class, being one of four men chosen as 
valedictorians. In 1887 he graduated at Earlham College, receiv- 
ing the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Science. Be- 
fore his graduation he was offered a place in the office of his pre- 
ceptor, Dr. J. R. Weist (who was then the leading surgeon in the 
Middle West, serving as secretary of the American Surgical Asso- 
ciation for twenty years"), and came direct from Bellevue to a place 
in the office. He formed a partnership with Dr. W r eist that lasted 
fourteen years and was dissolved by mutual consent two or three 
years before the death of the senior member. During this time 
Dr. Bond served as coroner of Wayne county four years (1884- 
1888), and was assistant surgoen of the Pennsylvania railroad ten 
rears, assisting" in several bad wrecks, among them the terrible 
Hagerstown disaster, where four persons were killed and some 
sixty injured. lie was one of the founders of St. Stephen's IIos- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 741 . 

pital and has been on the medical board of that institution and Reid 
Memorial Hospital since organization, until the present time, 1912. 
He was city health officer from 1906 to 1910 and brought about 
several reforms in meat and milk inspection for the city, getting 
Government inspection for the local slaughter houses, lie has for 
several years been very much interested in the study and preven- 
tion of tuberculosis and has given illustrated lectures on this sub- 
ject before many medical societies, as well as chautauquas and 
other popular audiences. He was a delegate to the Congress of 
Tuberculosis in London, in 1901, and the Governor of Indiana ap- 
pointed him a delegate to the Congress of Tuberculosis at Wash- 
ington in 1908. Me was very much interested in Bright's Disease 
for several years and was appointed to read four State papers on 
this subject before the State Medical Society. He is also interested 
in the photography of very small bodies, such as blood corpuscles 
and sections of tissues, as well as bacteria and other causes of dis- 
ease, and has given many lectures before medical schools, using 
lantern slides made from photographs of these small bodies. He 
is a member of the Commercial Club of the city of Richmond, the 
Young Men's Christian Association, the Tourist Club, and the 
lodge of Elks, having served as president of the Country Club in 
1911. He has an attractive home and the same is a center of gra- 
cious hospitality. In his political proclivities Dr. Bond is a Re- 
publican, and though he takes a loyal interest in all that concerns 
the welfare and general progress of his home city, county and 
State, he has had no desire for public office. He and his wife are 
active and valued members of the Presbyterian church at Rich- 
mond. He is a member of the Indiana Academy of Science, the 
National Society for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, the National 
Science Association, the American Medical Association, the Mis- 
sissippi Valley Medical Association, of which he was vice-presi- 
dent in 1897; the Union District Medical Association, of which 
he was president in 1910; the Wayne County Medical Society, of 
which he was president in 1889; and of the Indiana Medical So- 
ciety, of which he was president in 1895. He is one of those men- 
tioned in "Who's Who in America," in the "Men of Progress of In- 
diana," in "American Men of Science," and has been lately chosen 
by the New York Medical World as one of 250 — physicians and 
surgeons — in the I nited States for their medical album of five 
volumes. He has written many articles on medicine for journals 
and has illustrated several subjects in books by photographs from 
microscopic slides. On Sept. 18, 1883., was solemnized the marriage 
of Dr. Bond to Miss Julia M. Boyd, daughter of Dr. Samuel Boyd, 
of Dublin, Ind. Dr. Boyd was a prominent man in the State, was 
president of the State Medical Society in 1876, and took an active 
part in all moral public movements. Mrs. l>ond was a teacher in 
the public schools and a student in the State Normal at Terre 
Haute before marriage. Dr. and Mrs. Bond have two children: 
George S., a graduate of Earlham (1903) and of Ann Arbor (1905), 
and who also took a degree in medicine at the latter institution in 
1908, is assistant in medicine at Johns Hopkins, where he has been 



located four years. lie was married Dec. 2j, 1911, to Elizabeth 
Lida Jones, of Richmond. Florence M. Bond, who graduated at 
Earlham with the class of 191 1, is now a candidate for graduation 
in Smith College, Northampton, Mass., in June, 1912. 

Walter S. Commons, a prominent agriculturalist of the town- 
ship of Center, with residence in Centerville, was born at the old 
homestead, which he now owns and operates, on Noland's Fork, 
in Center township, March 28, 1853, tne youngest son of David and 
Bethena (Carter) Commons (see sketch of Joseph A. Commons, 
page 4G1, for ancestral history). Walter S. Commons received a 
practical education in the common schools, with a pleasant and 
profitable year at Earlham College, and with this he regretfully 
closed his school career to take up the solemn duties of life and 
care of his widowed mother, who died in 1896. Although instinc- 
tively an agriculturist, he has been identified with the growth and 
progress of the diversified interests of citizenship and has been 
financially interested in numerous commercial enterprises, with 
more or less success. That he is an "up-to-date" farmer is mani- 
fested by the man}' modern conveniences to be found about his 
place. Politically he believes in the principles of the Republican 
party, and his popularity is evidenced by the fact that in 1910 he 
was elected a member of the Indiana State Senate and is still an 
incumbent of that position. He was united in marriage in 1874 
to Miss Sarah A. Maudlin, daughter of Mark and Elizabeth Maud- 
lin. Three sons have graced the firseside of Mr. and Mrs. Com- 
mons — Ernest L., Charles C, and Horace J. The latter is engaged 
with his father in farming, and the two older sons are in business 
for themselves. Fraternally Mr. Commons is well affiliated with 
the Masonic order. 

Edward Young Teas, horticulturist, a prominent citizen of 
Centerville, was born at what is now called Quakertovvn, Union 
count}', Indiana, March 8, 1829. His father, Thomas S. Teas, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., and in that city was reared to manhood. 
At the age of twenty-two years he made the journey on foot, via 
Niagara Falls and Pittsburgh, to Preble count}-, Ohio, where he 
afterward married Miss Sarah C. Strattan, who had removed to that 
count}' from New Jersey with her parents. After his marriage. 
Thomas S. Teas established a linseed-oil mill (the motive power of 
which was a tread-mill for horses) on Four-Mile creek, near the 
present village of Fair Haven. After being so employed for a num- 
ber of years he removed to Union county, Indiana, and there 
erected a linseed-oil mill which was run by water power.' A num- 
ber ot \ ears later he removed to a farm south of Richmond, in 
Wayne count}, and resided there a few years. He then purchased 
a farm and saw mill in Henry county and resided there the remain- 



der of his life. His death occurred in 1850 am 


1 his widow survived 


until 1S70. They were the parents of live ell i 


ldren: John C. died 


in December. 1908; Edward Y. is the second ii 


1 order of birth; Mar- 


tha 1). died at Chattanooga. Tenn., in 1906; \\ 


amice S. is deceased ; 


and Thomas S. resides at Salem, Ohio. Edw 


ard Y. Teas received 


his educational training at Spiccland Acadei 


ny in 1 ienry county 



BIOGRAPHICAL 743 

and at Farlham College, and when but twelve years of age it may 
be said that lie began his successful career as a horticulturist. One 
day when he and his older brother, John C, were returning home 
from the postoffice, a neighbor gave them some cast-away apple- 
tree loots. The boys took them home, planted several rows, ana 
were so successful that, besides planting an orchard for themselves, 
they sold a number of plants to others. In this circumstance was 
begun the career of Mr. Teas as a horticulturist, in which he has 
been continuously engaged throughout a long and prosperous ca- 
reer, lie remained in Henry county until 1852. when he and his 
brother purchased the Aldrich nursery at Indianapolis, at that time 
the largest in the State, and they conducted it about four' years. 
Mr. Teas then started a nursery at Chester, north of Richmond, in 
Wayne count)', and was located there several years, after which 
he purchased a greenhouse in the southern part of the city of Rich- 
mond and conducted it several years. He then removed to Henry 
county and started a nursery at Dunreith, where he remained about 
fifteen years, and in June, toot, came to Centerville, where he has 
since resided. There his business has flourished from the start, and 
lie lias won a wide reputation as a horticulturist, the business at 
present being conducted under the name of E. Y. Teas & Son. Mr. 
Teas helped organize the Indiana Horticultural Society at Indian- 
apolis, in December, 1800. and of thirty-two charter members he 
is the only survivor. He has missed only two or three meetings of 
the society since it was organized. He is also a charter member of 
the American Nurserymen's Association, which includes all of the 
nurserymen in America. In the matter of politics Mr. Teas is 
aligned with the Prohibition party, but has never been an aspirant 
for public office of any nature. Fraternally he was formerly identi- 
fied with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious 
faith is that of the Orthodox Quaker church. Air. Teas was married 
in Indianapolis, in June, 1851, to Miss .Maria Givan, who died in 
1 86 1 , the mother of two children: Ellen M. is the wife of E. 1]. 
Hodgin, station agent at Wellsburg, W. Ya., and William S. is a 
resident of Frecport, N. Y., where he occupies the position of sta- 
tion agent. In 1863 Mr. Teas was married to Airs. Sarah A. (Stu- 
art) Coffin, daughter of Amos Stuart, of Henry count}-, and widow 
of Nathan Coffin., Of this union there are two children: Fred E. 
resides in Centerville and is associated in business with his father, 
and Mary T. is the wife of John E. Parker, of Eaton, Ohio, and at 
the present time is in Stuttgart, Germany, a student in the Con- 
servatory of Music at that place. 

William M. Bailey, a prominent telephone manager and citizen 
of the city of Richmond, is a native of the State of Smith Carolina, 
born in Barnwell count} - , Aug. 31, 1870. His parents, Frederick AI. 
and Caroline M. (Rice) Bailey, were born in South Carolina, and 
his father was a sea island cotton planter, owning 360 acres of land 
which were devoted to that industry. He served four years in the 
Confederate arm)' during the Civil war and after the close of the 
conflict was for twenty years the postmaster at Edisto Island, S. C 
He died in December, 1908, and his widow resides at Edisto. They 



744 MEMOIRS OF WAYNE COUNTY 

became the parents of five children, two of whom died in childhood 
and three survive, of whom William M. is the eldest. Minna is the 
wife of L. C. King, of Edisto, S. C, and Mildred resides at home 
with her mother. William M. Bailey received his early education in 
the schools of his native district in South Carolina and finished his 
schooling at Porter's Military Academy, at Charleston, S. C. lie 
afterward engaged in the telephone business with the Bell Tele- 
phone Company at Charleston, and remained thus engaged for a 
period of ten years, in various positions from learner to manager, 
lie then entered the independent telephone field and has since been 
connected with independent companies, in Charleston, S. C, in Ken- 
tucky, and in Richmond, Ind., and in 1901 came to Richmond, where 
he is the general manager and director of the Richmond Home Tel- 
ephone Company. This company was organized in 1899 and has 
had a very successful history. When Mr. Bailey assumed the man- 
agement of the business the company had only 1.250 telephones in 
use, and now it has over 3,300. The entire plant lias been recon- 
structed under his administration, and in 1906-07 a fine large build- 
ing was erected to accommodate the demands of a rapidly increas- 
ing business. . Mr. Bailey is also vice-president of the American 
Concrete Pole Company and is a director of the Indiana Toll Clear- 
ing Company, of Indianapolis. The American Concrete Pole Com- 
pany was organized in 1907 and constructs concrete poles under 
contract and sells the right to construct to other companies. The 
concrete pole is the invention of Mr. Bailey, and after much study 
and a series of tests he has demonstrated beyond all doubt that 
these poles will not only meet, but far surpass, all requirements 
and claims established for cedar poles. With the re-enforcement 
of electro-carbon twisted rods and spiral binding wires properly 
distributed in the column of cement, the poles are not only sub- 
stantial and durable, but remarkable elasticity is displayed. For 
instance, a pole thirty feet in length will permit a deflection of 
thirty inches before the cement cracks. To obtain the above result 
would require about one-third greater horizontal strain at the top 
than would be sufficient to destroy a cedar pole of the same dimen- 
sions. This invention seems destined to be generally adopted in 
the construction of all telephone and telegraph lines. Mr. Bailey 
was married in Charleston, S. C, Dec. 11, 1891, to Miss Elizabeth 
E. Gregorie, daughter of the late Henry II. Gregorie, of South 
Carolina, who, during the Civil war, served as a cavalryman in the 
Confederate army. His widow survives and resides at Sumter, 
S. C. Mrs. Bailey was born in Aurora, 111., but was reared and edu- 
cated in Charleston, S. C, and she is a direct descendant of the 
McGregor family of Scotland. On the maternal side she is a de- 
scendant of the Kemps and her grandfather was a brother of Sir 
James Kemp, at one time lieutenant-governor of Canada. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Bailey have been born three children — Gladys G., Eliza- 
beth K., and Emily E. Mr. Bailey is vice-president of the Young 
Men's Business Club at Richmond and a member of the Travelers' 
Protective Association. His religious faith is expressed by mem- 
bership in St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 745 

Lewis Weyl was born in the southern part of Perry township, 
Wayne county, Indiana, April 7, 1847, son °f J onn an( i Jemima 
(Pierce) Weyl. The father was born in Germany, Aug". 18, 1800, 
and migrated to America in 1818, coming- direct to Wayne county, 
where he built one of the first houses in the village of Economy, 
lie tanned deer skins, etc., and manufactured the hides into gloves, 
which he sold in wholesale lots and also at retail. Later he pur- 
chased an eighty-acre tract south of Economy, where he resided 
until 1870, his sons operating the farm, and he continued in the 
glove business until he retired, lie then returned to the village of 
Rconomy, where lie resided with his children until his death, Dec. 
14, 1876. lie was a man of sterling integrity, of generous impulses, 
and gained a high place in the esteem of his friends. His wiie, 
Jemima (Pierce) Weyl, was born in Ohio, July 14, 1812, and died 
July 11, 1881. They were the parents of eleven children: Delilah, 
born Sept. 15, 1832, died in 1903; Anna, born March 8, 1835, died 
in 1871 ; Susannah, born Nov. 6, 1837, died in 1840; Charles, born 
Feb. 9, 1840, is living retired in Williamsburg; Elizabeth, born July 
7, 1842, is the widow of Alvin Cain and resides in Economy; Mar- 
tha, born Oct. (1, 1844, is the wife of Francis Cain, of Economy; 
Lewis is the next in order of birth; Matilda, born March 1, 1849, 
died Feb. 12, 1859; Mary, born Feb. 17, 1851, is the wife of Abraham 
Covalt, of Muncie, Ind. ; Joseph, born June 30, 1855, died in the year 
of his birth; and William, born Dec. 20, 1858, died in 1859. Lewis 
Weyl was reared in this count}' and received his educational train- 
ing in the public schools. He worked at home until about nine- 
teen years old and then engaged in business as a dealer in live stock. 
Two years later he purchased a farm located two miles east of 
Kconomy and continued in the stock business and managed this 
farm until 1905, when he removed to the village of Economy and 
erected the dwelling where he resides. fie has recently sold 
his large farm, but still owns sixty acres of land in Perry township 
and ['60 acres in the Panhandle district of Texas, where two of his 
children reside, the family owning a section of land in one piece 
there. Mr. Weyl has been retired from the stock business since 
lyoo. On June 2, 1867, Mr. Weyl was married to Miss Polly Men- 
denhall, daughter of Caleb and Rosetta (Dean) Mendenhall, of 
Perry township, this county. Four children were the issue of this 
union: Glennie, born June 2, 1868, is the widow of J. E. Pallenger 
and resides at Plainsview, Tex.; Oliver C, born Sept. 15, 1870, mar- 
ried Celia Hunt and resides in Richmond; Fred D., born Dec. 24, 
1877, married Gussie Culbertson and resides in Texas ; and Cuss II., 
born Nov. 24, 1882, married Dessie Morrison, and is a farmer in 
Perry township. Mr. Weyl spends his winters in Texas and his 
summers in the village of Economy. Mrs. Weyl was born in Perry 
township, this county, Sept. 29, 1846. Mr. Weyl is a stanch sup- 
porter of the Prohibition party, and although he has never aspired 
to public office takes an active interest in national and local affairs. 
His religious faith is expressed by membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which he is a liberal supporter. The parents 
of Mrs. Wevl were natives of North Carolina, the father born in 



7-|'') MEMOIRS or WAYNK COUNTY 

1822 and the mother on Feb. 23, 1827. Caleb Me'ndenhall was a 
farmer by occupation and became a land owner in Perry township, 
where he spent the residue of his life, dying in 1867. llis widow 
survives and resides with a son in Perry township. 

Allen M. Harris, deceased, for many years a respected citizen 
of Richmond, was born in Green township, Wayne county, Indiana, 
Nov. 9, 1828. llis parents were James and Naomi (Lewis) Harris, 
natives of North Carolina. James Harris, a farmer by occupation, 
came to Wayne county about 1810, and there spent the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring Jul}- 20, 1854. Upon coming- to Wayne 
county he settled on a farm in Green township and in the district 
schools there Allen M. Harris received his educational training. 
Upon reaching manhood he engaged in agricultural pursuits, which 
occupation he followed throughout all of his active career, and he 
lived retired in the city of Richmond for about twenty-live years 
prior to his death. At the time of his death he was a director in 
the Union National Bank, of Richmond. His death, June r2, 1004. 
terminated a long life of usefulness. On May 14, 1850, was solemn- 
ized his marriage to Miss Rebecca Petty, born on Walnut Level, 
in Wayne count)-, March 18, 1832. Her parents also came from 
North Carolina, about 1830, and settled in Jefferson township, where 
her father gave his whole energy to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of his farm and was truly successful. He and his wife spent 
the remainder of their lives in Jefferson township. Of the union 
of Mr, and Mrs. Harris were born seven children — two sons and 
five daughters: John S. (see sketch); L. L. Harris is a retired 
farmer and resides at 2233 Main street, in the city of Richmond; 
Josephine is the wife of William It. Coffin and resides on a farm in 
Henry county, Indiana, two miles east of Spiceland; Rilla V. is 
the wife of C. D. Gray and resides on a farm near Muncie, Ind. ; 
Olive is the wife of Frank R. McPhail and resides at 100 North 
Twenty-first street, in the city of Richmond; Ella is the wife of 
R. A. Benton and resides in Richmond; and Frances is the widow 
of Charles II. Land (see sketch). The married life of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harris was a most happy one, they having enjoyed the unusual 
distinction of celebrating their Golden Wedding anniversary, and 
they lived in unalloyed bliss until Dec. 20, 1900, when the wife and 
mother died. Mr. Harris then continued to reside at the old home- 
stead, at 101 North Thirteenth street, until his death. Tn addition 
to his children, he is survived by a sister, Mrs. Serilda Thornburgh, 
of Dalton. In politics Mr. Harris affiliated with the Republican 
party, and though he never aspired to hold office served efficiently 
as justice of the peace while residing in Green township. He was 
an active member of the United Brethren church at Green's Fork, 
having joined that organization in early life. 

Benjamin Snow Whiteley, one of the popular citizens and rep- 
resentative farmers of his native count)-, is a worthy scion of one 
of the pioneer families of this favored section of the Hoosier com- 
monwealth. He was born on the farm where he resides, in Wash- 
ington township, Oct. 2i, 1877, a son of Daniel and Anna Maria 
(Snow) Whiteley, the former a native of Maryland and the latter 



. 



UIOGUAl'lllCAL 747 

uf Williams county, Ohio. Daniel Whiteley remained a resident 
of the State of Maryland until maturity, when he came to Indiana 
and numbered himself among the sterling citizens of Wayne county. 
In Posey township, Fayette county, his father, also named Daniel 
Whiteley, had secured a tract of land, comprising 160 acres, heavily 
timbered, and there Daniel, Jr., set himself vigorously to the task 
of reclaiming a farm from the primeval forest. Those of the younger 
generation to-day can scarcely realize how strenuous was the toil 
entailed and how many the vicissitudes to be endured in thus tak- 
ing the initial steps in the development of the great and opulent 
agricultural section which denotes the county in the opening years 
of this glorious '! wentieth century. Daniel Whiteley, Jr., lived up 
to the full tension of the labors and responsibilities of the pioneer 
and in due time purchased a farm of forty acres, which he reclaimed 
to cultivation, causing the stately monarchs of the forest to give 
place to productive fields, and he remained on this homestead until 
his death, about 1880. His wife, a devoted companion and help- 
meet during all the years of struggle and toil, survived him and is 
still living in Fayette county. Of their five children, Benjamin S. 
is the last in order of birth, and all are living. Edgar resides in 
Anderson, Ind. ; Mary is the wife of Lindley Hussey, of Fayette 
county; Ella is the wife of John F. Heacock. of San Francisco, Cal. ; 
and Byron resides in Fayette county. Benjamin S. Whiteley was 
reared under the environment and influence of agricultural pur- 
suits and early began to lend his aid in the arduous work of the 
home farm. His educational advantages as a boy and youth were 
those afforded in the district schools of Posey township, Fayette 
county, and the schools of the village of Milton, and he spent sev- 
eral years upon his father's farm, assisting in the work. In 1907, 
he inherited the place where he resides, and he gives his attention 
to the improvement and management of this farm, practically all 
of which is eligible for cultivation and devoted to diversified agri- 
culture and stock-raising. The buildings are modern and substan- 
tial and the attractive residence is a center of generous hospitality. 
Thrift and prosperity are in evidence on every hand, showing the 
energy and progressive methods brought to bear by the owner. In 
political affairs Mr. Whiteley is a Republican and lends his influ- 
ence and exercises his franchise in support of the men and measures 
of that organization. April 10, 1907, bore record of the marriage of 
Mr. Whiteley to Miss Gertrude Olive Clingman, born in Washing- 
ton township, a daughter of James and Hannah (Johnson) Cling- 
man, and of this union is a son, Robert Snow, born Feb. 4, 1908. 

Byram R. Pierce was born at the old Pierce homestead in Perry 
township, this county, Jan. 26, 1876. He is a son of Lewis and 
Hannah (Cain) Pierce, both born in Wayne county. Lewis Pierce 
is the grandson of Caynor Pierce, who was born and reared in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, later removed to Virginia and thence 
to Ohio, where he died. His widow then brought the family to 
Perry township, this county r , where her son, the father of Lewis 
Pierce, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1790, purchased the farm 
upon which Lewis Pierce resides. Lewis Pierce 1- one of the ven- 



748 MEMOIRS Ol" WAYNE COUNTY 

erable citizens of Perry township, lie is one of a family of thir- 
teen children and was born Nov. 13, 1833, on the farm where he has 
been residing seventy-eight years. This land was almost a wilder- 
ness at the time of purchase by the elder Pierce, and great hardship 
was encountered in clearing and getting it into condition for culti- 
vation. Lewis Pierce secured his education in the old log school- 
house in the neighborhood, where he attended school until he was 
fifteen years old, and as a young man worked as a farm hand by the 
day. At the age of twenty-three years he purchased a part of the 
old farm and rented the remainder, and afterward purchased ad- 
joining land until his farm now contains ninety-seven acres. On 
Aug. J3, 1856, he married Hannah Cain, daughter of Jonathan and 
Priseilla Cain, of Wayne county, and of this union were born four 
children: Webster, born in i860, died at the age of four years; 
l.eroy, horn in January, 1864, died in 1908 ; Anna, born Nov. 28, 
1868, died in 1891 ; and P»yram R. is the youngest and the only sur- 
viving child. Lewis Pierce followed general farming during his 
active career, making a specialty of fruit-growing, but is now living 
retired and rents out his fields. Politically he cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for John C. Fremont and has ever since voted with the 
Republican party. He and wife arc members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Economy. Byram R. Pierce received his edu 
cation in the .schools of Economy and as a boy worked on his la- 
ther's farm. 1 le began his independent career at the age of twenty- 
one by selling and putting up wire fences, which occupation he fol 
lowed about nine years, in 1906 he purchased a general merchan- 
dise store at Economy and conducted the establishment four years, 
at the end of which period he traded the store for the farm where 
he resides, and where, in addition to conducting a general fanning 
business, he is an extensive fruit raiser. At the present time he is 
a member of the township advisory board. Oil Oct. 17, 1904, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Claudia Kond, daughter of John and 
Melissa Bond, of Clay township, where Mrs. Pierce was born in 
1876. Of this union have been born two children: Robert Lewis, 
born April 4, 1907; and Mary Helen, born Nov. 13, 1910. Both Mr 
and Mrs. Pierce are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Economy, and Mr. Pierce is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, having passed through the chairs of the local or 
ganization and being now a member of the Indiana Grand Lodge. 
Ralph A. Paige was born in Ware, Mass., Aug. 26, 1825, and 
died in Richmond, Ind., Sept. 23, 1887. The ancestry of the famih 
can he traced back to the early part of the Seventeenth century, 
when settlement was made in Massachusetts by ancestors of the 
subject of this sketch. The grandfather, Maj. James Paige, was ? 
minute man on the immortal 19th of April, 1775, when \merican 
history first began to be made. His immediate ancestors were Ben 
jamin Paige and Mary Ann (Magoon) Paige. Benjamin Paige saw 
service in the Massachusetts militia, holding a commission as lieu- 
tenant, signed by Elbridge Gerry in 181 1, and one as lieutenant- 
colonel by Governor Brooks, of Massachusetts, in 1822. Ralph 
Paige was tin youngest of a large family of children. In 1831, when 



nioc.u.u'iiiCAL 74< j 

he was six years of age, his parents decided to try their fortunes 
in the great and then almost unknown West. They came out to 
Xanesville, Ohio, but after a short stay removed to Richmond, Ind., 
where Benjamin Paige for some time kept hotel, or "tavern," as 
was then the usual method of denominating hotel business, at what 
is now known as the northeast corner of Sixth and Main streets. 
In after years his son, Ralph A., owned and conducted a store at 
the southwest corner of Sixth and Main streets, which was his last 
place of business, and which property the widow owns. The son, 
Ralph A., for a brief period during his boyhood days, attended such 
private schools as the times and country afforded — crude and im- 
perfect affairs, compared with the system of modern times; but the 
greater part of his education was obtained through his own indus- 
try and efforts, after his daily work was finished, and the midnight 
hours often found him endeavoring to overcome the want of early 
educational training, lie began his busines career at an early age, 
first clerking for James Morrisson, Sr.. a relative of the well known 
Robert Morrisson, donor of Morrisson Library. After some time 
spent with Morrisson he was employed in the dry goods business 
with James E. Reeves, with whom he was associated later as partner. 
In r 846 he started a store at Williamsburg, Wayne county, Indiana, 
but after a short time there returned to Richmond, wdierc he con- 
tinued business with William Wilson. Upon the dissolution of this 
partnership he was associated with his cousin, Edwin C. Paige, in 
the dry goods business, with whom he continued in business until 
1853, when he bought otit his partner. Erom this period until the 
time of his retirement from active business, in 1873, he was alone 
in his business ventures, which he carried on with excellent judg- 
ment and success. In 1853 he was married, at Centerville, Ind., to 
Miss Mary E. McCullough, only child of Isaac W. McCullough, 
and a granddaughter of Samuel McCullough, one of the early 
settlers of Oxford, Ohio. Two children were born to them, 
Ralmaro and Lillian E. Fraternally he became a member of the 
order of Odd Fellows, and was an early Noble Grand in the 
first lodge at Richmond — Whitewater Lodge. He was also a char- 
ter member of Oriental Encampment, of which he was Chief 
Patriarch. He also obtained the charter and selected the name, it 
being suggested to him on account of the situation of Richmond, in 
the extreme eastern part of the State. Politically, his first vote was 
cast for Zachary Taylor. Upon the formation of the Republican 
party he became one of the original members of that organization, 
with which party he continued to affiliate. While in no sense an 
office-seeker or politician, he took great interest in the political wel- 
fare of his country; and his extensive reading of political history 
and his wonderful memory of events and dates were such that few 
men were better acquainted with the historic affairs of his country 
than he. Coming from New England Congregational religious train 
ing, his later years were, through family association, more or less 
Presbyterian. Though not a member of any church, his religious 
beliefs were well grounded, and his knowledge and practice ot fun 
damental religious principles were more thorough than those' of 



750 MEMOIRS OF WAY NIC COUNTY 

many of more pretensions, liis belief can best be expressed by an 
extract from a poem written by himself, which we cpiote : 

"When our work on earth is done, 

And time shall veil our setting sun; 

When the spirit shall leave its mortal mold, 

And all the glories of Heaven behold, — 

Then the goal of life is won." 

In his business relations he was thoroughly upright and con- 
scientious, gentlemanly, considerate and courteous in his personal 
and social contact, and with all mankind an honest man. 

Lee Ault, superintendent of the Cambridge Lit)- schools for 
ten years, was born at Xew Madison, Ohio, April 29, 1S46. His 
parents — Jacob \V. and Rachel (Wallace) Ault — were also natives 
of Ohio, the father bom al Germantown, near Dayton, May 20, 
1815, and the mother at Hamilton, Dec. 7, 1819. Jacob W. Ault 
came with his parents to Darke count}', Ohio, in 1837. lie was 
married to Rachel A. Wallace, Dec. 27, 1840. lie owned and oper- 
ated a farm in the southern part of Darke count} until 1870, when 
he removed to Greenville, Ohio, where he continued to reside until 
the time of his death, April 25, 19x33. I lis wife survived him six 
years and died in Greenville, Jul} 25, 1909. Throughout their 
lives, from childhood, they were active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They were the parents of eight children: John 
who died at the age of six years; Lee, the second in order of birth, 
is the subject of this sketch; Sarah Ann, who was the wife of Rev. 
I. M. Woolverton, of the North Indiana Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, died in August, 1879; II airy is in the em- 
ploy of the Southern Pacific railroad, and is located at Texarkana, 
Tex.; Wesley is Inspector of Weights and Measure